Johanna Ohmes: History

Johanna Ohmes is fascinated by stories. She loves seeing the way they connect, intertwine and build upon each other in the present and the past. That’s why she was drawn to Multnomah’s history program.

Ohmes chose Multnomah after attending community college for a year. “I desired a common worldview where I could be comfortable expressing my beliefs and building on what I already had,” she says. “I love the small class environment, engaging with professors and not being lost in a sea of people. It’s intimate learning.”

Diving into historical studies has made her think like never before. “History works with my brain,” she says. “I get to see the process behind social change and enter into different worlds. It’s creative, relevant, gives my mind something to chew on and creates empathy.”

While she’s been at Multnomah, Ohmes has maximized her time in the study of the past and in the present. She toured the nooks and crannies of London with her history professor and fellow students, she worked at a museum in Germany over the summer, and she is fully engaged in class discussions. “I lose track of time because of how good my clasees are,” she says. 

Studying history constantly points her to God’s design for humanity. “I love seeing God’s fingerprints on the human story,” she says. “I can see where he has worked.”

Ohmes can also see God’s fingerprints on the people around her at Multnomah. “I’ve found it fascinating to see so many people and stories,” she says. “There is both diversity and unity. This has enhanced my view of diversity among Christians.”

But the history program hasn’t come without paradigm shifts. “It’s both affirmed and challenged my thinking,” Ohmes says. “We talk about challenging issues. I’m forced to wrestle with my faith. It’s given me a stronger framework and filled in the gaps where I didn’t understand.”

Ohmes is excited to find out how her story will fit into the big picture. “Studying history is very general,” she says. “It helps train the way I think about processes and context. It will turn into an occupation, but I don’t know what yet.” Whatever it is, she’ll be ready to integrate it into her story.