Archive for July, 2014

Connecting Continents: Students Reach Out to Rwanda

Comments Off Written on July 24th, 2014 by
Categories: Missions, Students

This summer, a group of MU students traveled to Kigali, Rwanda, to serve alongside former MU professor, Dr. Garry Friesen, who now teaches at the Africa College of Theology. During the trip, the team visited The Dream Boys, a nonprofit program that feeds and educates homeless Rwandan children.

"Getting to spend time with these boys was one of the main highlights of our trip," says sophomore Heidi Birch. "We got to play games with them, read them Bible lessons, act out skits, and teach them how to make bracelets. I will never forget the love that radiated from their hearts. This trip has changed my life forever."

Read the full story, Impacted by Love: My Trip to Africa.

Reflections on a Life of Faith and Service

Comments Off Written on July 10th, 2014 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood

In light of Dr. Dan's passing, we've created a special page honoring his life and time at Multnomah.

On our Tribute to Dr. Dan page, you can:

  • Share your favorite memories of Dr. Dan
  • See how Dr. Dan has touched the lives of others
  • Watch his last chapel recording
  • View the official press release
  • Listen to Dr. Dan's memorial service recording
  • Read our commemorative story

Former Multnomah University President Dr. Dan Lockwood Dies at 65

Comments Off Written on July 10th, 2014 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood, Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore. — Dr. Daniel Lockwood, former president of Multnomah University, has passed away at age 65.

Lockwood died peacefully in his Portland home July 9. He was surrounded by family when he entered into the arms of Christ.

“We are all thankful for the way Dr. Dan invested his life in others as a dedicated follower of Christ, leader, teacher, encourager and humble servant,” said Dr. Craig Williford, Multnomah’s current president. “Serving others in the name of Christ was his passion and life commitment. He positively impacted our lives in numerous ways. We will miss him.”

Lockwood worked at Multnomah for more than 34 years. He taught theology for 11 years before serving seven years as seminary dean. In 1997, he became Multnomah’s fourth president. Throughout his time at MU, Lockwood continued to teach theology.

Due to health concerns related to cancer, he retired from the presidency November 1, 2013. He spent the past eight months in close connection with his family.

During Lockwood’s 16-year tenure as president, the University constructed seven buildings on its Portland campus, opened a campus in Reno, Nev., and launched a teaching site in Seattle, Wash. Eight graduate and seminary degree programs were created, and nine undergraduate majors were initiated. The Adult Degree Completion Program, which now provides three majors, was born in 2007. Multnomah was granted university status in 2008.

The Multnomah community mourns the loss of a gentle leader and an outstanding teacher. He leaves a legacy of theological integrity and unreserved faith in Christ.

Lockwood is survived by his wife of 41 years, Jani, and their daughter, Elise. A memorial service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Friday, July 25, at Lake Grove Presbyterian Church in Lake Oswego, Ore. All are invited to attend.

UPDATE: Listen to Dr. Dan's memorial service recording.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with teaching sites in Reno, Nevada, and Seattle, Washington. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

Impacted By Love: My Trip To Africa

Heidi Birch, a sophomore majoring in educational ministries, shares about her recent trip to Rwanda with a group of MU students.

The adventure of a lifetime

As I started my freshman year of college at Multnomah, I had no idea that by the end of the academic year I would be sharing God’s glory all around The Land of a Thousand Hills — that’s the nickname given to Rwanda, Africa, thanks to its beautiful, mountainous landscape.

This February, after Dr. Garry Friesen had retired from teaching at MU, he moved to Kigali, Rwanda, to teach at the African College of Theology (ACT), a newly formed Bible college. Dr. Friesen has a vision to build a bridge between the students of Multnomah University and the students of ACT, so he invited a team of six students from MU to visit Kigali in May this year.

When I first heard about this trip, I was extremely skeptical. I wasn’t sure if I could get the time off work or where God was guiding me in life. But I felt something tugging on my heart to at least interview for a spot on the team. Two short weeks later, I was signing papers and fundraising to go on the adventure of a lifetime.

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My team and me hanging out with the Dream Boys

Dream Boys

And six months later, there I was, standing alongside five others students, breathing in the African air.

First our team visited the African College of Theology. We got to sit in on classes, meet fellow Bible majors, and pray and worship alongside ACT students.

Then for three days of our trip, we got to help out with the Dream Boys, a nonprofit program that helps feed and educate the street boys of Rwanda. Getting to spend time with these boys was one of the main highlights of our trip. We got to play games with them, teach them Bible lessons, act out skits, and teach them how to make bracelets.

Though we taught them a lot, I feel as though they taught us more. Not only did they teach us words in their language, Kinyarwanda, but they also taught us how to smile — even in tough situations. One of the boys, Providence, had lost a finger just two weeks prior, due to an infection from a cut. But he was always one of the first to greet us with a grin on his face and joy in his heart.

Florence

After spending time with the Dream Boys, we got to drive out to two schools located in Kageyo, a village close to the border of Rwanda and Tanzania. At the second school, we got to go on our first Hope Visit to see a little girl named Florence. A Hope Visit is where a child who is not yet sponsored gets visited by one of the teams.

heidiburch_main

Florence, her family and me

From the moment I saw Florence, we became instant friends. Florence is one of four children who live with their widowed mother. When we arrived at her house, her mother looked at me holding her daughter’s hand. With tear filling her eyes, she embraced me tightly. I will never forget her face. It was a face of desperation, a face of hope, and a face filled with love.

When we first went to Florence’s home, she was unsponsored. But by the time we left, I knew that I had to sponsor her. Later the next day, I signed the papers, and she became my lifetime pen pal. I never realized what it meant to a child and their family to be sponsored till I sat in the house of one. A sponsorship can change a child’s life forever. It’s more than just a direct withdrawal and a letter now and then. It’s a uniform, an education, insurance, food, and a chance to thrive in a poor community.

I will never forget the love

This trip has changed my life forever. I will never forget the faces of those I met. I will never forget the love that radiated from their hearts. I will never forget the way that they trust their Savior — even in the most trying times of their lives. I am so grateful that Multnomah gave me the chance to experience a missional lifestyle outside of the U.S., and I’m excited for future opportunities to travel abroad to share the love of our Father with others.

Koby Krikac: No Boundaries

Comments Off Written on July 1st, 2014 by
Categories: Students

koby_mainAsk Koby Krikac why he chose Multnomah and you'll get a threefold answer: "One, it has the best language programs; two, it’s a biblical university; and three, it’s in Portland, and Portland’s weather is awesome," he says.

That last reason might seem odd — especially coming from a Los Angeles native. But Krikac wouldn't have it any other way. "I love how you can watch the seasons change here," he says. "You see God's beauty everywhere."

The Greek major has big dreams, and MU is proving to be the perfect launching pad. The senior is set on one day translating the Bible into a different language and planting a church in France with his wife. Studying at MU has been the first step toward that goal.

"Multnomah gives you the opportunity to master biblical languages," he says. "I’m learning from scholars who are professionals in their fields, so I have no boundaries of how much I can learn. I can grow as much as I want to!" Krikac says he plans on being fluent in both Greek and Hebrew (his minor) by the time he graduates in December.

Studying the languages is hard work, but the opportunity has given Krikac a deeper appreciation for God’s Word. "Certain flavors and colors of the Bible come out more when you read it in a different language," he explains. "What I’ve learned has given the Word a new depth."

Living on campus has made Krikac’s experience at MU even better. "The community really is a family," he says. "You get to know people quickly, and there are opportunities to invest in others."

And when it comes to investing in his education, Krikac is happy he chose a school that values financial aid as much as he does. "MU definitely helps you where you are," he says. "The grants and scholarships really help you out, but the things you learn here are priceless."

Krikac admits that some might see Multnomah's small size as a negative. But he encourages everyone to look past the surface. "You get such a quality education here, but in an intimate setting," he says. "And you get such great one-on-one moments with your professors. Plus, MU makes it possible for you to get two majors in four years — why wouldn’t you do that? This place faithfully teaches the Word of God and prepares you for life."