Archive for February, 2017

What I learned at the Global Missions Conference: A student’s perspective

Comments Off on What I learned at the Global Missions Conference: A student’s perspective Written on February 28th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Students, Theology

Global studies major and Marketing Assistant Meghan Krause shares her perspective on this year’s Global Missions Conference. 

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Dr. Karen Fancher speaks at MU's 77th annual Global Missions Conference.

This past week, Multnomah hosted the 77th annual Global Ministries Conference, or GMC. The GMC’s slogan for this year was, “Cultivating Renewal: Back to the Beginning.” A team of five students, led by Dr. Greg Burch, brought this whole conference together. These five students were Jamilyn Cummings, Moriah Paterson, Kara Swanson, Annica Davis and Jared Stone. From the decorations, to the advertisements, to the selection of speakers and guests, these five students confronted all of us about creation care and the part we play in this topic.

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From left to right: Moriah Paterson, Jared Stone, Jamilyn Cummings, Annica Davis, McKenzie Chapman and Kara Swanson.

GMC2One of the students from this team was senior Jared Stone, the GMC’s logistics coordinator, whom I caught up with as everything concluded. “The GMC went better than I even expected — from the coordination of decorations, to the responses the skits received, to the talk I have overheard from fellow students about the workshops,” he said. “It was great to bring the topic of creation care to the table for us as Christian students.” His statement appears to speak for itself from my observations.

As a student, I attended every plenary session that featured the keynote speakers, Dr. Miriam Adeney and Dr. A.J. Swoboda. With conviction, these two speakers connected Christianity and creation care on theological and practical bases. I attended a decent amount of the workshops as well. From these workshops, a few things definitively stuck with me. For example, La Montana exemplified how ministry and creation care can be quite interconnected. Dr. A.J Swoboda showed the significance and rejuvenation that keeping the Sabbath can have in all areas of life.

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Another thing that I observed during these workshops was fellow students pursuing knowledge and connections that would guide them in their journey of creation care. Questions like, “What can I do as an individual?” were thrown around, and answers were given that ranged from education and advocacy to living a simpler life. I myself, and many others, also enjoyed networking and learning from the many missions organizations that came to this year’s GMC. Meeting with individuals representing different organizations gave the GMC a personal touch, as students could find specific ministries that called to them.

GMC3A final aspect of this conference that students seemed to enjoy was the worship, led by Caleb Schmidt from Youth With A Mission. Every day I saw different students having intent conversations with Schmidt. So, I decided to ask about his experience at the GMC. “The best part has been seeing students encounter God and the concept of living present-centered lives,” he said. “The hospitality here has been amazing, and I love the heart for missions I have seen.”

Whether it was the plenary sessions, the call to creation care, or individual connections, the 77th GMC had something to offer to each member of the Multnomah community.

New Wine conference examines trauma and resilience from every angle

Comments Off on New Wine conference examines trauma and resilience from every angle Written on February 27th, 2017 by
Categories: General

Bad things happen. It’s a fact we all have to deal with, and there are better and worse ways to deal with it. However, even though we all have our own thoughts about trauma, we may rarely get to articulate them, sit with them or address them in any way. That’s where MU comes in. The Institute for Theology and Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins (New Wine), in partnership with Multnomah University and Multnomah Biblical Seminary, is hosting the Trauma and Resilience Conference from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, March 18. Read the rest of this entry »

MU celebrates grand opening of new study space

Comments Off on MU celebrates grand opening of new study space Written on February 20th, 2017 by
Categories: Students

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This afternoon, students, staff and faculty gathered to celebrate the grand opening of The Study, a new space for students who want to focus on homework. An extension of the Student Success Center, The Study is located in the southwest corner of the JCA. It takes the place of the former Commuter Center Lounge, which has since relocated to The Den.

“I’m so glad you’ve all made yourselves at home,” said Dean of Student Kim Stave to the group before her. “We’re so excited to open up this space. Our hope is that The Study will become a bustling center of academic effort and success. It’s been exciting to see this come to life!”

The Study offers computers and a printer, as well as several cozy areas designed for individual or group study. Food is permitted, and the space is available during the same hours as the JCA Student Center, which is typically open from 6:30 a.m. to 1 a.m.

The new space will be overseen by Christy Martin, assistant director for housing & academic support. And while The Study will usually be unstaffed, Martin announced there will be weekly study hall sessions when students can drop in without an appointment to meet with a staff member or tutor.

“We can provide more opportunities for students to maximize their learning,” says Martin. “We want this to be a place where people can learn from one another, connect with staff, and just drop in and get some homework done.”

Elementary Education major Sarah Carrier already plans on making The Study a regular haunt. “I think it’s a really beneficial and needed space,” she says. It’s homey and conducive for studying. I think students will really benefit from it.”

Study hall times

Tuesdays
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Staff member: Christy Martin

Wednesdays
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Student tutor

Thursdays
6 to 8 p.m.
Student tutor

If you have any questions about The Study, contact Christy Martin at cmartin@multnomah.edu.

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Meet our new director of alumni and parent relations

Comments Off on Meet our new director of alumni and parent relations Written on February 10th, 2017 by
Categories: Alumni

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For Natalie Correll, Multnomah isn’t just another university — it’s a gift. The new director of alumni and parent relations, who graduated from MU in 2016, says her own experience compelled her to take on this unique role with energy and passion.

“The faculty at MU constantly create spaces where people can become who they want to be,” says Correll. “They loved me as I was, but they also saw what I was capable of. It was incredibly inspiring. When you’ve been given that gift, you want to create that space for someone else.”

Correll’s new responsibilities will include managing the university’s alumni network, meeting with the Alumni Leadership Council, traveling to various alumni events across the US, and working with university volunteers and student employees. Her work as the university’s parent relations director will include building relationships with parents, as well as managing the Parent Connection, a quarterly newsletter written especially for MU parents.

“In the past, we haven’t had as much parent involvement as we’ve wanted, so I’m excited to invite them to connect with us,” says Correll. “We’re not just looking for parents who have unlimited free time — there will be a level of involvement for everyone. I want to hear their ideas and collaborate with them. ”

Vice President of Advancement Steve Cummings says his team is delighted to welcome Correll on board. “Natalie’s love and loyalty to Multnomah exudes from her vibrant personality, and I’m confident our more than 17,000 alumni worldwide will enjoy connecting with her,” he says. “I’m especially pleased that we’ve expanded this position to now include parent relations, something Natalie has experience with thanks to her time in Admissions. This will enable us to broaden our reach amongst all aspects of the Multnomah community.”

Correll, who previously worked for the Admissions Department as campus visit coordinator, will be taking over for Michelle Peel-Underwood, who served MU as alumni director for more than 11 years. “I’m excited to deepen the existing relationships that have been poured into by Michelle and the Advancement Department,” says Correll. “I put such a high value on narratives, and I can’t wait to share our alumni’s stories.”

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Global Ministries Conference to make creation care a priority

Comments Off on Global Ministries Conference to make creation care a priority Written on February 8th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Students, Theology

PORTLAND, Ore. — From February 21 to 23, Multnomah University will host the 77th annual Global Ministries Conference (GMC) on campus. The title of this year’s conference is “Cultivating Renewal: Back to the Beginning.” The seminars, plenary talks and activities will revolve around creation care in its many aspects. Read the rest of this entry »

MA in Global Development and Justice students travel to Rwanda

Comments Off on MA in Global Development and Justice students travel to Rwanda Written on February 6th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Programs, Students

Dr. Greg Burch, chair of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program, recently returned from a two-week stay in Rwanda with the MAGDJ program's very first online cohort. Students in the online MAGDJ program spend the first two weeks of their program in Rwanda, where they glean insights from guest speakers, study the world’s most pressing issues and team up with NGOs that are involved in compassion initiatives, poverty alleviation and combating injustice. You can learn more about the online MAGDJ program here

Learning on the Road in Rwanda

by Dr. Greg Burch

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

On January 3, Multnomah inaugurated its new blended online development and justice (MAGDJ) program in Rwanda. Students coming from California, Colorado, Oregon, Kenya and Rwanda joined together for a two-week experiential learning course that included a focus on learning from development organizations throughout the country. Learning from social entrepreneurs, community-based child care workers, refugees, and micro-finance and savings clubs participants proved significant for students working in the fields of international development and global justice.

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Memorial site in Kigali, Rwanda's capital city, where more than 250,000 victims of the 1994 genocide are buried. All in all, the 1994 genocide left nearly 1 million people dead.

One primary focus of the trip was learning from a country that suffered a genocide in 1994. Rwanda has faced significant suffering and also profound transformation since that time. Genocide memorials, including a visit with a perpetrator and a victim helped the students understand the profound nature of forgiveness and reconciliation. In meeting with Emmanuel (a genocide perpetrator) and his victim, Alice, who survived a machete and spear attack from Emmanuel and the loss of her baby, met with us to describe their healing process and what Christ has done in their lives to bring them into a close relationship today. The conversation was truly stunning. We learned forgiveness and reconciliation is possible even with the most heinous of crimes.

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Visits also included time with a number of non-government organizations and ministries, including Africa New Life Ministries, Tearfund, World Relief, These Numbers Have Faces, Prison Fellowship, International Teams, Word Made Flesh, and Arise Rwanda. The course led us through the importance of a solid biblical understanding for engaging in transformational development and biblical justice with an emphasis on peace and reconciliation, micro-finance and job creation, savings clubs, refugee resettlement, and education in poverty contexts, just to mention a few.

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Learning about World Relief with country director Moses Ndahiro.

There are a number of standout experiences from our time in Rwanda, but Alice and Ariana demonstrated a powerful example in their entrepreneurial efforts as electrical engineering students in designing and preparing to manufacture solar lamps that will provide light for children studying at night in refugee camps in the country. What was so capturing was that they themselves come from refugee backgrounds and struggled to read at night with candles.

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Learning from social entrepreneurs Alice and Ariana, and from the program These Numbers have Faces.

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Beans – a staple in a country where malnutrition continues to plague many communities, despite valiant efforts.

Another significant event was our time in a refugee camp. Eighteen thousand people, primarily Congolese people who have been forced out by insecurity and conflict, live just across the border in Rwanda in a cramped camp managed by the UNHCR. Our primary focus in the camp was on access to education by the 9,000 children and youth in the camp. Much of our time was spent with students, the very few, that have access to school through sponsorship programs. Spending time with refugees and hearing their stories was moving. Stories that involved faith, hope and patience as they await placement in countries around the world, with many having to wait eighteen or even twenty years as governments decide on permanent location.

These MAGDJ students will spend the next 18 months in online courses and internships reflecting on these and other field experiences as they take classes on micro-finance, refugees, nonprofit leadership, human rights and the like. For more information on our online Global Development and Justice program, go here.

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Participating in a savings and loan club in rural Rwanda with Arise Rwanda.

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Clean water in Boneza – Arise Rwanda has dug 12 wells for the community of 24,000 people.

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Clean water projects are critical to reduce water-borne diseases.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.