Author Archive

Missing Links: On Faith and Science

Comments Off Written on October 21st, 2014 by
Categories: Seminary

Multnomah Biblical Seminary was recently awarded a national grant  that addresses the missing links between faith and science in a seminary education. MU seminary professor Paul Louis Metzger, Ph.D., comments.

All truth is God's truth

metzger_mainIt is well known that Evangelical Christianity has often experienced a difficult relationship with science. The Scopes “Monkey Trial” in 1925 left an indelible mark on the psyche of many segments of the movement. As George Marsden wrote, “It would be difficult to overestimate the impact” of the trial “in transforming fundamentalism.” George Marsden, Fundamentalism and American Culture: The Shaping of Twentieth-Century Evangelicalism — 1870-1925 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1980), p. 184.

Ironically, the Evangelical movement has benefited greatly over the decades in various ways from implementing scientific and technological advances in communication and media for gospel proclamation and archeology for apologetics. Given the widespread Evangelical conviction that all truth is God’s truth as centered in Christ and Christian scripture, it is incumbent upon Evangelicals, including their universities and seminaries, to extend the interface of faith and science to other spheres.

They live in two universes

At its home in the Pacific Northwest, Multnomah Biblical Seminary serves numerous thriving Evangelical churches that draw people from diverse backgrounds and vocations, including science, medicine, and technology. Still, one wonders how well the pastoral leaders in these Evangelical congregations integrate faith and science in service to their parishioners and their vocations. All too often, these parishioners feel like they live in two universes — one of faith and one of science. Links are missing that will help us make these two universes one. If church leaders are not able or prepared to help young people make constructive connections, what will happen to the next generation of Evangelical Christians and beyond?

David Kinnaman addresses this concern and many others in You Lost Me: Why Young Christians Are Leaving Church...And Rethinking Faith (Baker Books, 2011). Kinnaman quotes a young man named Mike, who says: “I knew from church that I couldn’t believe in both science and God, so that was it. I didn't believe in God anymore” (p. 138; italics added). While Mike’s statement may seem to some a bit rash, still, it points to a growing sense of need among many for pastoral leaders to help equip their congregations to engage in serious discussion and the integration of faith and science. Such equipping will also include vocational preparation for people in their congregations entering scientific fields.

We have a responsibility

Seminaries have important roles to play in equipping pastoral graduates for effective ministry in a scientific age. But are they seizing the opportunity? It makes sense for pastoral and missional reasons that institutions become more intentional in preparing its pastoral candidates and alumni to engage science in constructive ways. Just look around. The scientific realm is expanding. Take for example my region, the Greater Portland Area in Oregon. Intel, Tektronix, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, and Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), as well as other organizations dedicated to scientific progress, are located nearby.

Portland prides itself on its attentiveness to scientific concerns and progress. For all the talk of alternative forms of spirituality in addition to Christianity that flourish in the region, there is also a great deal of antagonism on the part of certain sectors in the scientific community to faith of any kind. Secularism, including the New Atheism, is very robust in Portland and in other places in the Pacific Northwest. Given Multnomah Biblical Seminary’s commitment to preparing our graduates for effective ministry in a very diverse culture, we have a responsibility to assist the churches we serve in cultivating a thoughtful, irenic and comprehensive approach to the integration of faith and science.

Effective ministry in our scientific age

For these various reasons, I am delighted to report that Multnomah University’s seminary was awarded a National “Science for Seminaries” grant. Multnomah Biblical Seminary is one of 10 seminaries nationwide selected by The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for a combined $1.5 million in grants to incorporate science into core theological curricula. The grant will provide resources to integrate science into select core courses, such as systematic theology, biblical studies, church history and pastoral theology. It should be noted that the AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion does not advise on theological content, but only provides support for science through resources and mentor recommendations. The courses will be developed and implemented over the next two years and provide seminarians with solid, science-focused instruction.

“Many people look to their religious leaders for guidance on issues relating to science and technology, even though clergy members may get little exposure to science in their training,” said Jennifer Wiseman, director of the AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics, and Religion (DoSER). The Science for Seminaries grant for “Integrating Science into Core Theological Education” through AAAS in collaboration with our accrediting body, the Association of Theological Schools, will make it possible for our seminary to focus energies on equipping pastors and pastoral candidates for more effective ministry in our scientific age.

The theater of God’s glory

Through Multnomah University’s Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins’ oversight and coordination, Multnomah Biblical Seminary faculty will integrate subject matter pertaining to astrophysics, human cognition, and macro-biology in select seminary courses. A New Wine conference and Cultural Encounters journal issue will help make the findings available to the community at large. The aim is to help our seminary graduates increase their scientific awareness of pressing issues and integrate faith and science in constructive ways as they equip their congregations for truthful and meaningful witness in the twenty-first century. This scientific pursuit will assist us in discerning more clearly how the whole creation is the theater of God’s glory.

In closing, I should add that my seminary colleagues have joked (perhaps half-joked!) about their ulterior motives in their research for this grant: the grant will provide them the opportunity to prove their long-standing hypothesis that I am the “missing link” in the evolution of species. So much for the age old tension in Evangelical circles between faith and science!

 

Paul Louis Metzger, Ph.D. is a Multnomah University seminary professor, director of its Institute for the Theology of Culture, and project leader for the grant initiative at Multnomah Biblical Seminary.

 

Contact: Kristina Rhodes, Communications Specialist, 503-251-6469 or krhodes@multnomah.edu

President’s Greeting — Fall 2014

Comments Off Written on October 2nd, 2014 by
Categories: Newsletter

Dear Multnomah Family,

The new school year is successfully under way. I am thankful for all our new and returning students. God enabled us to meet or exceed almost every one of our new student enrollment goals.

Carolyn and I just returned from the All School Retreat, and it was a blast. The Young Life Washington Family Ranch in Eastern Oregon is a beautiful facility. The students, staff and faculty who attended seemed to have a wonderful time. There was such a positive and exciting spirit among all who attended. I judge God was moving in our midst, and I was honored to experience His presence with our students.

Biblical wisdom and power in contrast to human wisdom and power is one of the main themes I am exploring with our Multnomah Family this year. The Apostle Paul said, “For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel — not with wisdom and eloquence, lest the cross of Christ be emptied of its power” (NIV, I Corinthians 1: 17). And King Solomon told us that the fear of God is the beginning of wisdom.

I suggest the sacrificial death and resurrection of Christ may be the most complete expression of God’s wisdom and power. When we pursue biblical wisdom we are actually pursuing Christ, who is the living example of biblical wisdom and power.

So, I am calling our Multnomah Family to pursue Christ together this year. I am asking if we, as the body of Christ here at MU, might deepen our love for Him over the months ahead.

On another note, you probably have heard me call Multnomah University a “biblical university”. It may help if I explain in more detail what I mean when I use that descriptor. Here at MU we are biblical university that:

  • Combines the strengths of the Bible college with the strengths of the Christian liberal arts school as we pursue biblical wisdom and power
  • Commits to the inspired, inerrant, authoritative word of God as it frames our explorations and expressions of God’s truth
  • Intentionally works so that biblical and theological studies collaborate and collide with studies in arts and sciences to provide clarity to the most important questions of life
  • Prepares graduates to effectively and faithfully serve in a variety of vocational settings (like full-time, vocational ministry or the public market place) with passion for Christ, a servant’s heart, and a Holy Spirit-formed mind and soul

May I ask a favor? With this deeper understanding of MU as a “biblical university”, will you share the exciting story of MU with your friends and family? Will you continue to pray that God will empower us to do this work He has called us to do?

When you are on campus please introduce yourself — I value meeting members of the MU Alumni Family.

God’s blessings.

Craig Williford

President, Multnomah University

Couple donates 16th-century Torah to MU

Comments Off Written on September 4th, 2014 by
Categories: Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore. — Ken and Barbara Larson, from Bonita Springs, Fla., are giving a rare and valuable Torah to Multnomah University.

scrollThe Torah is a parchment scroll on which the first five books of the Old Testament were written. The Larsons purchased several scrolls, all of which are hundreds of years old, in Israel.

Ancient Asset Investments, a brokerage firm dealing in rare biblical artifacts, is assisting the couple with the donation process. Todd Hillard, the firm’s owner, said the Larsons had a vision for placing the Torahs in leading seminaries. “The Larsons have a deep passion for seminary education,” he said. “They want history to influence future scholars.”

Vice President of Advancement Steve Cummings said the gift will further ignite students’ passion for God’s Word. “This is an incredible and generous gift,” he said. “It will bring an added dimension to their educational experience that will last for many years.”

Although the scroll is centuries old, Hillard said it’s durable enough to be used frequently for decades to come. “All Torahs are innately priceless,” he said. “This one is in perfect condition.” He added that the scroll — which is two feet tall and 89 feet long — was likely used in synagogues.

University President Dr. Craig Williford said the artifact will help sharpen students’ interpretation skills while enhancing their appreciation for the Bible’s reliability. “Having direct access to such an important historical copy of the Torah will enable them to connect to the rich heritage of biblical transmission and translation work,” he said.  “This will affirm their appreciation of the Scriptures as God’s inspired, authoritative word.”

The scroll’s formal dedication will be hosted on campus and is tentatively set for early February.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with teaching sites in Reno, Nevada, and Seattle, Washington. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

Former Multnomah University President Dr. Dan Lockwood Dies at 65

Comments Off Written on July 10th, 2014 by
Categories: Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore. — Dr. Daniel Lockwood, former president of Multnomah University, has passed away at age 65.

Lockwood died peacefully in his Portland home July 9. He was surrounded by family when he entered into the arms of Christ.

“We are all thankful for the way Dr. Dan invested his life in others as a dedicated follower of Christ, leader, teacher, encourager and humble servant,” said Dr. Craig Williford, Multnomah’s current president. “Serving others in the name of Christ was his passion and life commitment. He positively impacted our lives in numerous ways. We will miss him.”

Lockwood worked at Multnomah for more than 34 years. He taught theology for 11 years before serving seven years as seminary dean. In 1997, he became Multnomah’s fourth president. Throughout his time at MU, Lockwood continued to teach theology.

Due to health concerns related to cancer, he retired from the presidency November 1, 2013. He spent the past eight months in close connection with his family.

During Lockwood’s 16-year tenure as president, the University constructed seven buildings on its Portland campus, opened a campus in Reno, Nev., and launched a teaching site in Seattle, Wash. Eight graduate and seminary degree programs were created, and nine undergraduate majors were initiated. The Adult Degree Completion Program, which now provides three majors, was born in 2007. Multnomah was granted university status in 2008.

The Multnomah community mourns the loss of a gentle leader and an outstanding teacher. He leaves a legacy of theological integrity and unreserved faith in Christ.

Lockwood is survived by his wife of 41 years, Jani, and their daughter, Elise. A memorial service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Friday, July 25, at Lake Grove Presbyterian Church in Lake Oswego, Ore. All are invited to attend.

UPDATE: Listen to Dr. Dan's memorial service recording.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with teaching sites in Reno, Nevada, and Seattle, Washington. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

Impacted By Love: My Trip To Africa

Heidi Birch, a sophomore majoring in educational ministries, shares about her recent trip to Rwanda with a group of MU students.

The adventure of a lifetime

As I started my freshman year of college at Multnomah, I had no idea that by the end of the academic year I would be sharing God’s glory all around The Land of a Thousand Hills — that’s the nickname given to Rwanda, Africa, thanks to its beautiful, mountainous landscape.

This February, after Dr. Garry Friesen had retired from teaching at MU, he moved to Kigali, Rwanda, to teach at the African College of Theology (ACT), a newly formed Bible college. Dr. Friesen has a vision to build a bridge between the students of Multnomah University and the students of ACT, so he invited a team of six students from MU to visit Kigali in May this year.

When I first heard about this trip, I was extremely skeptical. I wasn’t sure if I could get the time off work or where God was guiding me in life. But I felt something tugging on my heart to at least interview for a spot on the team. Two short weeks later, I was signing papers and fundraising to go on the adventure of a lifetime.

heidiburch_group_main

My team and me hanging out with the Dream Boys

Dream Boys

And six months later, there I was, standing alongside five others students, breathing in the African air.

First our team visited the African College of Theology. We got to sit in on classes, meet fellow Bible majors, and pray and worship alongside ACT students.

Then for three days of our trip, we got to help out with the Dream Boys, a nonprofit program that helps feed and educate the street boys of Rwanda. Getting to spend time with these boys was one of the main highlights of our trip. We got to play games with them, teach them Bible lessons, act out skits, and teach them how to make bracelets.

Though we taught them a lot, I feel as though they taught us more. Not only did they teach us words in their language, Kinyarwanda, but they also taught us how to smile — even in tough situations. One of the boys, Providence, had lost a finger just two weeks prior, due to an infection from a cut. But he was always one of the first to greet us with a grin on his face and joy in his heart.

Florence

After spending time with the Dream Boys, we got to drive out to two schools located in Kageyo, a village close to the border of Rwanda and Tanzania. At the second school, we got to go on our first Hope Visit to see a little girl named Florence. A Hope Visit is where a child who is not yet sponsored gets visited by one of the teams.

heidiburch_main

Florence, her family and me

From the moment I saw Florence, we became instant friends. Florence is one of four children who live with their widowed mother. When we arrived at her house, her mother looked at me holding her daughter’s hand. With tear filling her eyes, she embraced me tightly. I will never forget her face. It was a face of desperation, a face of hope, and a face filled with love.

When we first went to Florence’s home, she was unsponsored. But by the time we left, I knew that I had to sponsor her. Later the next day, I signed the papers, and she became my lifetime pen pal. I never realized what it meant to a child and their family to be sponsored till I sat in the house of one. A sponsorship can change a child’s life forever. It’s more than just a direct withdrawal and a letter now and then. It’s a uniform, an education, insurance, food, and a chance to thrive in a poor community.

I will never forget the love

This trip has changed my life forever. I will never forget the faces of those I met. I will never forget the love that radiated from their hearts. I will never forget the way that they trust their Savior — even in the most trying times of their lives. I am so grateful that Multnomah gave me the chance to experience a missional lifestyle outside of the U.S., and I’m excited for future opportunities to travel abroad to share the love of our Father with others.

A Greeting from Dr. Craig Williford

Dear Alumni Family,

It’s an honor and a great privilege to assume my role as Multnomah’s fifth president today. I’m humbled by the legacy and rich heritage of Multnomah University and want to personally thank each of you for the ways you have represented Multnomah with godly distinction.

The strength of any university lies within the quality of its alumni, and Multnomah University is strong because of the ways you've invested your life in service to others — either in the marketplace or vocational ministry, locally or around the world.

As president, I want to express my complete and unreserved affirmation of Multnomah’s faith statements, mission and core values. As a biblical university, our continued aim will be to integrate the Bible into all aspects of our educational experience as we prepare alumni to be biblically competent, academically proficient, spiritually formed and culturally engaged. We trust that God will continue to infuse our future alumni with servants’ hearts and faithful lives — just like yours.

I’m excited about what lies ahead. MU faces some external and internal challenges, like many other faith-based universities. But we’re committed to prayerfully embracing these challenges while also identifying the exciting opportunities that exist as we seek to expand the work of the Gospel. As we seize these opportunities, we’ll continue to add new majors and grow our online course offerings to ensure that as many people as possible are able to benefit from the Multnomah educational experience.

I invite you — a vital part of Multnomah’s ongoing legacy — to join with us in this critical effort. If I may, I’d like to challenge you in the following three ways:

  1. Continue to tell your story. Prospective students seek advice from people they trust — people like you. Historically, our alumni have proven to be our strongest recruiters, so use your influence to motivate people to attend MU. You might even consider taking more course work yourself. We continue to expand our degree offerings and would love to have you back on campus.
  1. Join us in prayer. The board and I are calling the MU community to a day of prayer Saturday, August 16, and we would love to have you join us on campus that day. You also can join us through the spirit of prayer from wherever you live. I believe that prayer places us in a posture of humility that enables us to hear God’s voice and wisdom. Our plan is to pray in every classroom, office, dorm and gathering space throughout the entire campus as we ask God to use our human interactions in these spaces to help us fulfill our mission. We desire a strong presence of Christ on our campus and endeavor to create relationships, spaces and experiences where the Holy Spirit can transform our students. We will give more details regarding our day of prayer soon.
  1. Be a part of Multnomah’s ongoing legacy. Prayerfully consider how you might invest your time, talents and treasures to support MU in its eternally-focused mission.

I look forward to meeting you and hearing from you in the days and weeks ahead.

With deepest appreciation,

Craig

Cascade Collegiate Conference Approves MU’s Membership Application

Comments Off Written on June 19th, 2014 by
Categories: General, Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore. —The Cascade Collegiate Conference approved Multnomah University’s membership application this week, moving the Lions one step closer toward conference participation during the 2015-16 season. Read the rest of this entry »

MU Basketball Team Shares Gospel in Taiwan

tipsCoach Curt Bickley shares the details of the Lions' mission trip to Taiwan this month. 

Multnomah in Taiwan

The basketball team flew to Taipei on May 9 and spent the week playing basketball games and sharing the Gospel. We were able to share the Gospel publicly 12 times during the week.

Thanks to our Taiwan missionaries for all their help and for making this trip work:

  • Uwe Maurer
  • Rex Manu
  • Dave Freeman
  • Garrett Freeman
  • Dan Long

Games

We played 8 games in 6 days. At each game, we were able to share the Gospel with the other team and their fans at halftime. All the teams were very open to listening to the mission of our trip.

We handed out bracelets that said Multnomah University on one side and John 3:16 on the other. We told the crowd to Google both. Our interpreters were great, and there were times when we even used guys from the other team to interpret.

TAIWAN TECH

Bethany Christian School

We visited Bethany on Tuesday morning. Stevie Sansone and Davey Walker shared their testimonies with the kids after I spoke. We played Hot Box free throws with the kids and had a great time.

bethany

Taichung Elderly Home Visit

Rex Manu set up a great visit for our guys. We listened to Grandma Wu share her life story, and then the residents listened to me share mine. Our guys then massaged the arms and hands of the elderly and then Rex shared the plan of salvation. Eight people who wanted assurance of a home in Heaven raised their hands.

ELDERLY HOME

granny

Kinmenn Islands

We flew out to the Kinmenn Islands and spent the day on scooters riding around both islands before we made our way out the the only school on the island. We spent time with the junior high, gave them Jeremy Lin books and shared the gospel. It was the first American basketball team to ever visit their school.

FOOD

SCOOTERS

Love Life Basketball Game

Saturday night was a special treat for everyone: We played the SBL All Star team (Taiwan Pro League). The purpose of the game was to raise awareness and money for kids with cancer. We did not know how big of an event it was until we showed up and saw hundreds of fans lined up to get in an hour before the game.

During the introduction of players, each player from both teams came out with one of the children. Blackie Chen prayed for the kids with both teams out on the court.

TEAM

At halftime, I was able to share the Gospel with over 700 fans and players. After the game, we spent time with everyone involved. We actually won the game by a score of 63-56, surprising most. Our guys represented MU extremely well that night; it was a great success.

ll5

 Thank you to all our donors that made this trip happen! 

— Coach Bickley

Graduates Reflect on Years Well Spent

Spring term has now come to a close. Last Friday night graduates walked across the stage, accepted their diplomas and tossed their hats into the air in celebration. I sat down with several of our exceptional graduates from our college, graduate school and seminary to hear more about their experiences and the impact a Multnomah education has had on them. 

 

GradFall2014_3Name: Danae Cowan

Hometown: Sweet Home, Ore.

Majors: Bachelor of Arts

Favorite MU memory: “During a late-night study session with my roommate in Memorial Hall, we were struggling to stay awake. Every hour on the hour, without a word, we’d drop our books and run one lap around our dorm. By the second and third time, we were laughing so hard we couldn’t stop.”

Dream job: “I’d love to work with women who are hurting and are in need of healing.”

Favorite professor: Dr. Val Clemen, who taught her Gender in Ministry class. “I love the way she connected with her students. She has such a huge love for Jesus and her students.”

Local perks: “I went to the Portland Art Museum this year and loved it. I also enjoy just walking through the city and people watching.”

Lesson learned: “Multnomah is a place where I learned about grace.”

 

GradFall2014_4Name: Ethan Knudson

Hometown: Renton, Wash.

Majors: Bachelor of Arts

Favorite MU memory: One night during his junior year when he and his friends were playing soccer. “My friend Charlie said to us, ‘If I make this next goal, you have to copy me and do whatever I do next. Deal?’ He made the goal, and then we all had to run through the sprinklers, which had just come on. That was a fun night.”

Dream job: After earning a master’s degree in teaching, Ethan hopes to become a theology professor and team teach alongside his fiancée. “I want to be in a position that allows me to connect with students and mentor them.”

Favorite professor: Dr. Karl Kutz, his Hebrew professor. “He’s brilliant. He cares about the heart and soul care of each student. He prepares you to face tough questions and tough seasons in life.”

Local perks: Eating at Salt and Straw and food carts like Thai Garden. “I love going to Townshend Tea with my fiancée and reading.”

Lesson learned: “Being at MU has been the most life-defining experience I’ve had. I’ve learned to be OK with not having all the answers, whether it’s about theology or life in general. That’s been freeing and has allowed me to enjoy life.”

 

GradFall2014_2Name: Clarissa Smith

Hometown: Golini, Kenya

Majors: Bachelor of Arts

Favorite MU memory: “One night Danae Cowan and Kayla Thomas and I dressed up and went out to dinner in Portland. It’s was pouring rain. You should have seen us balancing umbrellas in our heels trying to find the restaurant. We had a blast. After dinner, we went to Fred Meyer and bought roses to bring to Oregon Health and Sciences University Hospital. While we were at Fred Meyer, our car broke down! After we got it running, we took the tram up to the hospital and delivered the roses to nurses. That was super fun. The women I’ve become friends with at MU are wonderful. Together we laugh, cry, go on adventures and share what God has been doing in our lives.”

Next job: She’s moving to China to teach English for one year. “Only the Lord could take a girl who grew up in a tribal village in Kenya and send her to the big cities in China to teach English.”

Favorite professor: Dr. Ray Lubeck, who taught her Old Testament and Biblical Theology class: “His ability to take big concepts and present them in a way that’s understandable and relatable is unique. He gives his students a curiosity to learn for the rest of their lives.”

Local perks: “I love going to Monty’s Café for chai tea or Palio’s for a late-night study session. Another favorite activity is going to get frozen yogurt at YoCream (frozen yogurt.) Also, the international food scene here in Portland is really good.”

Lesson learned: “To live my life with open hands.”

 

GradFall2014_1Name: Jason Cybulski

Hometown: Burlingame, Calif.

Degree: M.A. in Pastoral Studies/Christian Leadership

Favorite MU memory: Jason, who lives in married housing with his wife and two daughters, spoke highly of the Multnomah community. “There’s nothing better. It’s great to meet new people and live life together with our families.”

Next job: Teaching Pastor at Potter’s Hands in Tigard, Ore.

Favorite professor: “That is an unfair question. One of my favorites is Prof. Tom Schiave, who taught my Theology of Community in Ministry class. He took time away from academia to shepherd those of us who wanted to go into vocational ministry.”

Local perks: He and his family enjoy discovering new places to eat. “The food here in the city of Portland is great.”

Lesson learned: “It’s important to cultivate the mind of a scholar, but that’s not worth anything without a pastor’s heart that can shepherd people.”

 

GradFall2014_5 Name: Rie Doss

Hometown: Kyoto, Japan

Degree: Master’s in Divinity, Chaplaincy track

Favorite MU memory: Rie remembers the MU community fondly. “I enjoyed learning from my classmates.” The M.Div. program is so rigorous that Rie stressed the importance of the support she found at MU. “We encouraged each other.”

Next job: Chaplain Fellow at Portland VA Medical Center

Favorite professor: Dr.  Roger Troutmann, her advisor. “He was a great mentor — always there for me and very encouraging.”

Local perks: Hiking in the Gorge during the spring and summer and snowshoeing in the winter opened doors for her to enjoy God’s creation.

Lesson learned: “Trust in God. Keep working. At the beginning, I felt very scared. But I took one week at a time and one class at a time.”

 

Lee Sellers to Lead Multnomah’s Business Administration program

Comments Off Written on April 29th, 2014 by
Categories: Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore.- Multnomah University has hired Lee Sellers to lead its Business Administration program.

As chair, Sellers will teach and mentor students, hire and supervise adjunct instructors, manage curriculum, and identify ways to grow the program. He also will help develop marketing, recruiting and retention strategies while cultivating partnerships that benefit students and the community at large.

Sellers, who holds an MBA, comes to Multnomah with considerable experience in business and higher education. In addition to teaching at two colleges and two universities, Sellers has owned and operated his own consulting business for more than 14 years.

Sellers said he’s looking forward to getting into the classroom and connecting with students. “I enjoy challenge, and I’m excited to build something here,” he said. “I want to develop a world-class program that prepares students to go into the real world and make connections with people that reflect the gospel.”

Multnomah’s emphasis on biblical integration drew him to the University. “I don’t have to covertly communicate my faith like I had to at my old jobs,” he said. “I can talk about it openly here.” And the position itself was too good to pass up. “The job description fit me so perfectly,” he said. “I still can’t believe this is real.”

Sellers focused on leadership, organizational behavior and ethics while earning his MBA. His teaching experience includes positions at George Fox University, Eastern Oregon University, Clark College and Mount Hood Community College.

He has a broad background spanning business, academia and non-profit environments, and he has created, developed and grown several businesses. In each business, Sellers was responsible for all aspects of strategy, finance, sales, marketing, personnel, operations and internal controls.

Sellers is committed to community service. He has spent more than 26 years volunteering at various nonprofits, including the American Red Cross, St. Benedict’s Hospital and Big Brothers Big Sisters. He also uses his consulting business to provide free personal finance training for low- and middle-income families. “My goal is to assist families in becoming debt free and meeting future financial goals,” he said.

During his time at Multnomah, Sellers plans to change the Church’s often skewed perception of Christian business leaders. “You don’t have to be a pastor or a missionary to serve God well — you can be salt and light in the business world too,” he said. “It’s not a second-class calling. Every time our business majors graduate, I hope they find their true purpose and that they are adequately prepared to pursue it. I want them to have the chops to hit the road.”

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About Multnomah University
Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with teaching sites in Reno, Nevada, and Seattle, Washington. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.