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MA in TESOL graduate Bernie Bernardo: Representing the Master Teacher

Comments Off Written on February 25th, 2015 by
Categories: Students

Bernie Bernardo, an English instructor at Portland Community College and Columbia School of English, says MU’s MA in TESOL program didn't just teach him practical methodologies — it taught him to own an uncompromising faith.

“At Multnomah, you learn how to become a teacher who represents our Master Teacher,” he says. Read Bernie's story.

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Found in translation: Hebrew program gives students insight into the biblical text

Comments Off Written on February 24th, 2015 by
Categories: Programs

Multnomah offers one of the finest Hebrew programs in the country. Expert professors provide a solid educational experience focused on extensive reading and designed for long-term retention. Devoted mentorship, innovative teaching methods and an in-depth understanding of language are the hallmarks of this major. "We’re learning things that are normally introduced at an advanced level ," says Hebrew major Julia Glanz.

Earlier this month, MU received a Torah scroll that will provide countless learning opportunities for Hebrew students in the decades to come. "It feels like we’re participating in a piece of history," says Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz, who headed two Dead Sea Scrolls projects at MU in 2013 and 2014. "When you’re reading from a scroll that someone read from hundreds of years ago, that’s pretty cool. The Torah takes the history of the biblical text from an abstract expression to something tangible." 

Learn more about MU's Hebrew major.

Striking the right chord: Music program brings students, listeners closer to God

Comments Off Written on February 16th, 2015 by
Categories: Students

MU's music program equips students — musically and spiritually — for effective worship and ministry in any setting. By combining studies in Bible, theology and ministry with classes in musical training, knowledge and practice, the Music Department prepares graduates for leadership in churches, arts productions, parachurch organizations and community arts organizations. Graduates are teaching music, leading bands and recording albums.

Music majors are given access to private lessons, practice rooms and a fully-equipped professional recording studio. They also get plenty of one-on-one discipleship with professors. Wendy Contreras credits Music Director Stan Campbell with helping her see the point of making music: bringing people back to God. “I saw how the Lord used my music to touch people,” she says. “When I realized that he’d given me this gift, I wanted to be responsible with it. Multnomah’s music program is great for people who want to speak of the Lord in the art they create.”

 Learn more about MU's music program.

MU’s Torah unrolls new learning opportunities for community

Comments Off Written on February 6th, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Press Releases, Students

Thursday dawned wet and dreary, but it might as well have been Christmas for MU’s Hebrew department. As soon as people filed into the JCA Student Center that morning, they saw the reason: A 16th-century Torah scroll lay partially unfurled on stage, offering the crowd an enticing glimpse into the rich history of biblical transmission work.

MU president Dr. Craig Williford commenced the Torah Dedication Chapel by introducing the donors, Ken and Barbara Larson, who had flown in from Florida that morning.

“We can feel your enthusiasm in the air,” said Barbara Larson. “We’ve been impressed by your faculty and students, and we’re excited for what this Torah will do for the school.”

The scroll, which is durable enough to be used frequently for decades to come, will provide countless learning opportunities for MU students.

“We intend to use the scroll as an object of study in and of itself,” said Biblical Languages Chair and Hebrew professor Dr. Karl Kutz. “We can learn about scribal work, the transcription process and more.”

MacKenzie Williams and Chad Woodward are two students who will benefit from using the Torah, and they expressed their gratitude to the Larsons during the dedication.

“Thank you for this opportunity to grow as a Hebrew community,” said Williams. “This means a great deal to me.”

The gift means a great deal to Kutz as well.

“You can imagine I’ve been anticipating this moment for some time,” he told the crowd. The scroll, he said, represents many things: history, centuries of faithful copying, transmission work, and the enduring faith of God’s people. But most importantly, he noted, it represents an appeal. “This Torah is an invitation to a relationship with the living God…an invitation to me and you,” he said.

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Colloquium attendants encircled the room as the scroll was fully unfurled for the first time. View the full photo album on Facebook.

After the dedication chapel, the scroll was swaddled in cloth, tucked into a padded suitcase and transported to Bradley Hall for a colloquium with Ancient Manuscripts Expert Dr. Scott Carroll.

Four long tables, each draped with a black tablecloth, lined the stage. As the Torah was carefully unrolled, it crackled and popped, creating stiff waves along the tabletops.

The 89-foot scroll, Carroll said, was composed somewhere in Eastern Europe during the Reformation. Constructing the parchment for such a Torah is no small feat — the artifact is comprised of 50 calf skins.Vegetable components were used for ink and goose feathers for writing. It took a scribe an entire year to create the manuscript. 

“If this Torah could talk to us, imagine what it could say and what it’s seen,” said Carroll. “It was preserved through the Enlightenment and the Holocaust. Through a wonderful turn of Providence, it’s in your community now.”

Listeners were invited on stage to get a firsthand look. Some gently touched the scroll's edges — smooth on top, suede on bottom. Others bent over the relic, iPhones poised. A few scanned the impeccably centered lines of text, their eyes searching for familiar passages.

Carroll then asked everyone to encircle the room so the scroll could be completely unfurled, a scene you might witness in some synagogues during the Jewish festival Simchat Torah. Young and old, seasoned Hebrew scholars and novices alike held the Torah together. It was the first time the scroll had ever been fully unraveled.

Hebrew student Thomas Belcastro was euphoric. “It’s beautiful,” he said. “When I came to Multnomah, I didn’t expect I’d ever be holding a 600-year-old scroll. I actually get to study it on Monday.” 

MU is celebrating the donation of a rare Torah scroll — and you’re invited

Comments Off Written on January 27th, 2015 by
Categories: Chapel, Events, Students

When students arrive for chapel on February 5, they’ll know something different is about to happen. The lights in the Student Center will dim, accentuating a brightly-lit stage dominated by an 89-foot-long scroll. The crowd will be peppered with new faces: members of Portland’s Jewish community, local Hebrew professors, pastors, university presidents, board members and Multnomah alumni. Everyone will be there for one reason: celebrating the official dedication of a rare Torah.

Influencing future scholars

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Multnomah is one out of 40 seminaries nationwide receiving a Torah from Ken and Barbara Larson.

The Torah, a parchment scroll on which the first five books of the Old Testament were written, is more than four centuries old and was likely used in a synagogue in eastern Europe.

Last fall, Ken and Barbara Larson, who collect ancient manuscripts, announced their decision to gift the valuable artifact to Multnomah Biblical Seminary. The Larsons purchased several scrolls, all of which are hundreds of years old, in Israel. Multnomah is one out of 40 seminaries nationwide receiving a Torah from the couple.

Ancient Asset Investments, a brokerage firm dealing in rare biblical artifacts, has been assisting the Larsons with the donation process. Todd Hillard, the firm’s owner, said his clients had a vision for placing the Torahs in leading seminaries. “They have a deep passion for seminary education, and they want history to influence future scholars,” he said.

‘A testament to Multnomah’s commitment to the Scriptures’

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Hebrew student Daniel Somboonsiri will be reading from the Torah scroll during the dedication chapel.

Multnomah’s scholars are already bubbling with enthusiasm over the generous gift. “The students are very excited,” said Biblical Languages Chair and Hebrew professor Dr. Karl Kutz. “It feels like we’re participating in a piece of history. When you’re reading from a scroll that someone read from 400 years ago, that’s pretty cool.”

Students will begin reading the scroll at the Torah dedication. After University President Dr. Craig Williford and the Larsons share a few words, Hebrew students Becca McMartin and Daniel Somboonsiri will read from the scroll out loud. Dr. Kutz will close the ceremony by giving a message from Psalm 19, where David wrote about the central importance of God's Word in our lives.

“Receiving this scroll is a testament to Multnomah’s commitment to the Scriptures,” said Kutz. “It’s a pretty significant object.”

And although that object is more than four centuries old, it’s durable enough to be used frequently for decades to come.

“We intend to use the scroll as an object of study in and of itself,” said Kutz. The document has corrections made by scribes, which opens doors to many more unique learning opportunities. “We can learn about scribal work, the transcription process and more,” he said.

Making history tangible

Dr. Kutz and students analyze a fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Dr. Kutz and students analyze a fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Following the dedication chapel at 10 a.m., an expert in ancient manuscripts will lead a colloquium* at 11 a.m. in B1. Listeners will be treated to the full history of MU’s scroll and even get to handle the document themselves. The session will conclude at noon.

“I’m looking forward to the opportunity for our students to interact with another historical manuscript,” said Kutz, who headed two Dead Sea Scrolls projects at MU in 2013 and 2014. While he admits students can feel disconnected when delving into the intricacies of how the Scriptures of yesterday became the Bible of today, he’s confident the scroll will help bridge the gap. “The Torah takes the history of the biblical text from an abstract expression to something tangible,” he said.

Event details

Everyone is invited to attend the special chapel at 10 a.m. in the Joseph C. Aldrich Student Center and the colloquium* at 11 a.m. in B1. If you would like to RSVP or ask questions about these events, contact Joy Kruger at 503-251-5361 or joykruger@multnomah.edu.

*A conference at which a scholar or expert presents papers on, analyzes and discusses a specific topic.

DCP student Michael Watson: ‘This program is above and beyond what I expected’

Comments Off Written on January 22nd, 2015 by
Categories: Students

For Michael Watson, the reason for returning to college was simple. “I want to finish my degree before I’m 30,” he says. But once he began his classes, the biblical foundations major realized he was going to learn more than he ever imagined.

“The Degree Completion Program has been above and beyond what I expected,” he says. “It’s incredible how relevant everything is.” Read Michael's story.

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Executive director and DCP alumna Gayle Fidanzo: ‘I wouldn’t be the leader I am without MU’

Comments Off Written on January 12th, 2015 by
Categories: Alumni, Press Releases, Students

When Gayle Fidanzo was offered a job at Christian Family Adoptions, she was reluctant to accept.

“We all want the desires of our heart — but I didn’t know my heart yet,” says the leadership and ministry major. The DCP graduate dreamed of taking risks, working overseas and rescuing women from slavery. “I thought an adoption agency would be boring,” she says.

It was quite the opposite. Read Gayle's story.

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Multnomah University Updates — Winter 2015

Comments Off Written on January 8th, 2015 by
Categories: Newsletter

Looking back on 2014

crosscountry_mainNathan Meeker wins NCCAA Division II National Championship

Nathan Meeker is the first runner from Multnomah University to win an NCCAA cross country title and the first person in MU history to win any type of individual-sport championship. Meeker ran the 8K course in 26 minutes, 39 seconds. His teammate, junior Ryan Brown, finished third in 27:46. 

The rest of the University men's cross country team, as well as Sindy Larson from the women's team, also competed at the championship event, hosted in Houghton, N.Y. “The state of Oregon has a long and rich history of successful distance runners,” Coach David Lee said. “Multnomah is now a part of that history.”

Read Meeker's full press release.

Read Sindy Larson's article.

Community counseling center is open, accepting new clients

CounselingCenter_featureimageThe MU Community Counseling Center, which opened in October 2014, is now seeing and accepting clients. Sandwiched between Sutcliffe Hall and Montavilla Park, the center meets two vital needs: training MAC interns and serving Portland community members with low-cost therapy.

Counseling Center Coordinator Chris Cleaver helped his interns develop a sliding scale that charges session fees based on clients' household incomes. Cleaver says the scale makes counseling affordable for people who might not otherwise be able to pay for therapy. “I see this center as a gateway to our community,” he says. “Our interns have great training, and we're passionate about serving people.”

The counseling center is also available for Multnomah alumni. Visit the counseling center page to learn more, check prices or make an appointment.

Read the full article.

Seminary awarded national 'Science for Seminaries' grant

SeminaryGrant_thumbLast fall, Multnomah Biblical Seminary was one of 10 seminaries nationwide selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for a combined $1.5 million in grants to incorporate science into core theological curricula.

The grant will provide resources to integrate science into select core courses, such as systematic theology, biblical studies, church history and pastoral theology. The courses will be developed and implemented over the next two years and provide seminarians with solid, science-focused instruction.

“The evangelical movement has benefited greatly from implementing scientific and technological advances in communication and media for gospel proclamation,” said Dr. Paul Louis Metzger, MU seminary professor and director of its Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins.

Read the full press release and FAQ.

Looking ahead in 2015

MU to host Torah dedication ceremony

scroll_featuredLast fall, Ken and Barbara Larson gifted a rare and valuable Torah to Multnomah Biblical Seminary. The Torah, a parchment scroll on which the first five books of the Old Testament were written, is more than two centuries old and was likely used in synagogues.

The scroll’s formal dedication will be hosted February 5, 2015, in the Joseph C. Aldrich Student Center. All alumni are welcome to attend the event, which includes a special chapel at 10 a.m. and colloquium at 11 a.m.

RSVP before January 27 by contacting Joy Kruger at 503-251-5361 or joykruger@multnomah.edu.

Read the full press release.

President to share vision for MU's future during national tour

This is your chance to meet MU's new president, Dr. Craig Williford, and hear his vision for Multnomah, which includes:

  • Creating a global campus
  • Inspiring an infectious love of service
  • Building moldable and resilient Christian character
  • Developing a diverse learning community

Vice President of Advancement Steve Cummings and Alumni Director Michelle Peel-Underwood will join Craig as he connects with alumni and friends of MU across the U.S. Visit the presidential tour page for a full list of events and locations.

50-year alumni society event

50YearAlum_thumbMultnomah annually honors its graduates of 50 years by inducting them into our 50-Year Alumni Society. To applaud this important achievement, we have a special day of celebration planned on Friday May 8, 2015. The day's activities will include a baccalaureate chapel, special luncheon and induction ceremony, 50-year class reunion, tour of the campus, and participation in Multnomah's graduation ceremony that evening. This special event is a great way to reconnect with friends and review the Lord's faithfulness for the last 50 years.

RSVP by contacting Michelle Peel-Underwood at 503-251-6458 or munderwood@multnomah.edu.

Fall graduates look to the future with confidence

Comments Off Written on December 12th, 2014 by
Categories: Events, Students

Last week, Multnomah students walked across the stage of Central Bible Church as part of our fall graduation ceremony. Among the group of participants were Wendy Contreras, Quincy Robinson and Ruben Alvarado — three students who have grown to embody the biblical wisdom, resilient character and infectious servants’ hearts that set our alumni apart.

wendy_thumb'This is what I was created to do'

Wendy Contreras was insecure about pursuing music until she began a private class with MU’s voice instructor, who recognized her rich potential. “She made me see that I needed to pursue singing and never give up,” says the music ministry major. “I saw how the Lord used my music to touch people. When I knew he’d given me this gift, I wanted to be responsible with it.” Now Contreras is performing at events and recording an album with her worship pastor. “God has been opening doors for me everywhere,” she says. “This is what I was created to do.” Read Contreras' full story.

quincy_main'A foundation for my future'

Quincy Robinson has mastered the skills he needs to climb the academic ladder. The Hebrew major dreams of teaching Epistemology and Math at Stanford or Oxford. “What lies ahead for me is going to be easier because I’ve been doing graduate-level work at the undergrad level,” he says. Now Robinson is enrolling at Portland State University to earn his master’s in mathematics. “A degree from MU is a foundation for my future,” he says. “This school is an amazing place to push you forward.” Read Robinson's full story.

'The professors learn right alongside you'

MU’s emphasis on strong student-faculty connections made a meaningful impression on M.Div. student Ruben Alvarado. “No matter how experienced the professors are, they’re still vulnerable enough to learn right alongside you,” he says. “They give their students opportunities to write with them, serve with them, study with them and travel with them.” ruben_mainAlvarado recently began a job as executive assistant for Rick McKinley, MU professor and lead pastor at Imago Dei Community. “I'm excited to learn from and work with Rick,” Alvarado says. “The education I received — as well as the experiences I’ve had at MU as a teacher’s assistant, tutor and student leader — have prepared me to step confidently into this new stage of my life.” Read Alvarado's full story.

Walking confidently into new stages of life is exactly what all our graduates are doing, and we couldn’t be more proud of them.

Geneva Arnold: Finding a balance in Reno-Tahoe

Comments Off Written on December 1st, 2014 by
Categories: Seminary, Students

I’m too old. I don’t like school. It’s too much money. Geneva Arnold thought 2aup several excuses when she felt a pull toward seminary. “I’d had no vision for nine months,” she says. “But one day I was praying, and God told me to get a ministerial degree.”

Arnold was appalled. She came up with every reason not to go. Finally, thinking she’d found a way out, she decided to cut a deal. “I told God, ‘If you want me to go, then my husband has to be on board,’” she says. But when she told him, he surprised her. “Of course,” he said. “What else would you do?” And that was that. Arnold was going to seminary.

After spending the next four years earning her bachelor’s degree at local colleges, the time came to look for a seminary. Arnold was struck by the polar opposites she encountered. “There were some seminaries that made me wonder if they were Christian at all, while others were rigid and patriarchal,” she says. “When I settled in at MU, I found a balance. It has a good, scholarly environment that’s challenging. At the same time, there’s openness to innovation.”

Arnold was the first woman to attend the seminary at MU’s Reno-Tahoe campus. But rather than feel intimidated, she was empowered by the academic quality and close-knit community she found. “I felt respected in all the classes,” she says. “I’m impressed by the quality of the professors; they’re knowledgeable, and they sincerely love the Lord and the spiritual formation of their students. That is meaningful to me.”

Three years deep into the M.Div. program, Arnold is appreciating the depth of study she’s investing in the Scriptures. “I’m a better student of God’s Word,” she says. “I know how to read it better, ask questions of the text, mine out what God is saying and see it as an integrated whole. I loved the Bible before, but now I have expertise, confidence and the tools to find meaning and communicate it.”

But is biblical expertise important in a world that constantly questions the value of a seminary education? Arnold, who’s been attending churches for the past 30 years, says yes. “I do see a difference,” she says. “None of the pastors at the churches I attended had seminary degrees. I grew spiritually, but there was also damage, setbacks, mishandling and misunderstandings. None of those churches remain today. Those problems would have been settled if their leaders had a well-rounded education. They had the passion — but not the knowledge and wisdom.”

Although Arnold isn’t sure where God will lead her after graduation, she plans on diving into Christian conference and seminar work so she can travel nationally and internationally for speaking engagements. Wherever she ends up going, she’s confident that her education will have thoroughly equipped her for her calling. “You have to have something of everything,” she says. “And a seminary education gives people the broad-based education that they need for ministry today.”