Events

Homecoming 2016

Comments Off Written on January 6th, 2016 by
Categories: 80th Anniversary, Alumni, Events

Homecoming is about tradition. It’s a time for reconnecting with old friends and establishing new. It’s about nostalgia. It’s about  remembering our rich heritage with wistful affection as we seek to carry on the MU legacy. It’s about uniting the past with the present as we aim to provide an opportunity for every constituent of the university to come together and celebrate as a whole. 

Traditions, nostalgia, legacy…in essence, Homecoming is all about coming home!

You're Invited

We invite you to join us February 12-13 as students, staff, faculty, friends and alumni join together to commemorate MU’s 80-year anniversary. Come help us celebrate God’s faithfulness as we rejoice over all he has done since our founding in 1936.

Whether it’s been years since you’ve been on campus or just months since you graduated, we are looking forward to seeing you again and celebrating the MU legacy together — a legacy you have not only helped build, but one you continue to lead.

Special Events

Distinguished Professor Emeritus, David Needham will be our special guest speaker for Friday night’s Homecoming dinner celebration. Other special events will include: class reunions, class visits, a campus tour, a MU community fun run/walk, volleyball alumni mixer and scrimmage, alumni basketball open gym, women’s and men’s basketball games, and more!

Come home and reconnect with classmates, professors, former roommates and friends. Rediscover your favorite things about MU!

Continuing the MU legacy while uniting alumni and friends,

Michelle Underwood
Director of Alumni Relations

P.S. To secure your spot for Friday night’s Homecoming dinner celebration, please contact Michelle Underwood  or 503.251.6458. Space is limited. RSVP is required.

Lions team up with Tim Tebow Foundation, local church for Night to Shine

Comments Off Written on January 6th, 2016 by
Categories: Athletics, Events, Students

The MU women’s basketball team is used to collaborating on the court. But since their recent partnership with Central Bible Church and the Tim Tebow Foundation, the Lions are unifying to present Night to Shine, an unforgettable prom experience for people with special needs.

More than 100 churches around the world were chosen to simultaneously host Night to Shine events Friday, February 12, 2016. Central Bible was one of three churches in Oregon selected for the honor.

“This is so exciting because it’s such a unique chance to serve our community,” says Tim Bieri, who coaches women’s basketball at MU. “We’re honored to be part of shining Christ’s light in this way.”

As sponsor of Night to Shine, the Tim Tebow Foundation will provide each host church with an instruction manual, financial support, individualized staff guidance, and a prom kit complete with decorations and gifts for attendees.

NightToShine

On the big night, guests will enter the church on a red carpet while friendly paparazzi snap photos. Inside, volunteers will provide VIP treatment: hair, makeup and corsages for the girls, and shoe shining and boutonnieres for the boys. Karaoke and dancing will round out the evening. During the crowning ceremony, every attendee will be declared prom king or prom queen.

But something more than the glittery tiaras, shimmery dresses and spiffy shoes will shine on that night. God’s love will be gleaming, reflected by the many volunteers who have poured their hearts into this special event.

During Night to Shine 2015, 44 host churches and 15,000 volunteers worked together to honor more than 7,000 people with special needs. This year, host churches worldwide are expected to serve more than 20,000 prom kings and queens. At Central Bible Church, a minimum of 100 volunteers will work with more than 75 guests.

WBasketballTeam

A production of this size will require some dedicated workers. Fortunately, the basketball team is no stranger to commitment. The Lions are wholly responsible for planning and organizing the event, which includes coordinating vendors, sending invitations and reminders, managing volunteers and donations, and setting up and tearing down decorations.

Even though their lives are brimming with basketball, school and jobs, the women are enthusiastic to tackle this new mission. “It’s a challenge for us as a team,” says sophomore Michaela Weller. “But it’s pushing us out of our comfort zone, and that’s important. It’s a blessing to be a part of God’s work in this.”

Valerie Wakefield agrees. “It’s a great opportunity to work with Central Bible and other churches in the area,” says the sophomore. “One of my favorite things is seeing so many people come together as the body of Christ.”

The Lions didn’t make it to the playoffs this year, so they’ve deemed Night to Shine their championship game. For Nicole Verrett, the prom is a more impactful opportunity in comparison. “It’s something that will last,” says the senior. “I think (the guests) will know that people care about them and want to serve them.”

If you want to volunteer for Night to Shine, contact Tim Bieri at 503.251.6463 or tbieri@multnomah.edu.

Students collect food for Giving Tuesday, donate proceeds to Oregon Food Bank

Comments Off Written on December 2nd, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Students

There's always chapel on Tuesday, but today was a special kind of gathering. Today was the culmination of MU's food drive in observance of Giving Tuesday, a globally celebrated day dedicated to giving back. 

Since mid-November, students, faculty and staff have been adding non-perishable foods to the large white barrels stationed around campus. And today, those barrels — full to the brim — were brought to the front of the stage for a celebratory chapel before they were given to the Oregon Food Bank.

"We asked ourselves, 'What can we do to give to the Portland community?'" says Vice President Steve Cummings. "We came up with this idea for a food drive. We want to give back because we want to reflect the character of God."

Giving Tuesday Group Photo

Senior Drew Schinderwolf agrees. "It shows that we care," says the pastoral ministry major. "And it shows that we're not set apart, living in a bubble — we're a part of the community."

Freshmen and fellow history majors Ivory Linger and Hannah Aguirre were excited when they heard about about the initiative, and they're delighted the food drive is being established as a Multnomah tradition.

"It's the simplest acts that make a difference," says Linger. "This is something small we can do that does make a difference and shows people you care about them."

Aguirre concurs. "If you can give, it brings you closer to others," she says.  "I know God's going to use this to reach people."

Give what you can during our campus food drive!

Comments Off Written on November 13th, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Students

We all know about Black Friday. And Cyber Monday. But have you heard of Giving Tuesday?

Giving Tuesday, the first Tuesday of every December, is a globally celebrated day dedicated to giving back. That means charities, businesses, community centers and people around the world will join together to promote generosity.

Multnomah is celebrating by kicking off a campus-wide food drive that will donate all proceeds to the Oregon Food Bank.

GivingTuesday

About the food drive

Food drive kickoff

Monday, November 16

Last day to drop off donations

Tuesday, December 1, by noon

Where to drop off your contributions

Donation stations will be available in:

  • The Advancement Office
  • The seminary
  • The Student Lounge in the JCA

The Student Lounge will be the primary collection point.

Who can participate?

Everyone! Students, staff and faculty are all invited to participate. Don’t be surprised if you’re challenged by a department or student group to see who can collect more food items!

Join us

Your contributions will make all the difference to hungry families this season. Buy some healthy food choices at a local grocery store (choose items from the list below) and drop them off at one of our Food Bank Buckets. Tell your classmates and get your friends involved. The more the merrier!

What to donate

  • Canned meats (i.e., tuna, chicken, salmon)
  • Canned or dried beans
  • Canned fruits and vegetables (reduced sodium and reduced sugar)
  • Whole-grain foods such as brown rice, whole grain cereal and whole-wheat pasta
  • Soups, chilies and stews (reduced sodium and reduced fat)
  • 100 percent fruit juice (canned, plastic or boxed)
  • Shelf-stable milk
  • Unsaturated cooking oils

Giving Tuesday celebration

The food collection will culminate December 1 with a reflection chapel in the JCA, where we’ll stack all the food donations and take a group photo to celebrate God’s provision.

That afternoon, the food will be gathered up from MU and transported to the Oregon Food Bank. We’re looking for students to volunteer for this process. If you’d like to be involved, contact the Advancement Department at advancement@multnomah.edu.

80 ways to give

If you’re looking for even more ways to give, check out our 80 Ways to Give page that we made in honor of Giving Tuesday and our upcoming 80th birthday. Choose from the creative list of ideas, and start giving in new ways today!

Learn more

To learn more about Giving Tuesday, visit www.givingtuesday.org.

To learn more about the Oregon Food Bank, visit oregonfoodbank.org.

Seminary Preview on November 9

Comments Off Written on October 23rd, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Seminary

Connect the Word to the world

Your calling is unique, but the call to Christian leadership in every field requires biblical wisdom, spiritual maturity and cultural awareness. Those are the qualities you'll develop at Multnomah Biblical Seminary. Read the rest of this entry »

Free documentary screening, discussion of “Professor Norman Cornett” November 2

Comments Off Written on October 9th, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Media

New Wine, New Wineskins at Multnomah University is proud to host a public screening/discussion of the documentary “Professor Norman Cornett: Since when do we divorce the right answer from an honest answer?” on November 2, 2015.

About Professor Norman Cornett

NormanCornett_blogProfessor Cornett is a specialist in theology and culture, particularly theology and the arts. He developed a method of teaching which he calls, “dialogic, ” that uniquely engages students’ creativity. He lost his job at McGill University over the impact of this methodology, and his former students rallied around him.

The documentary

Professor Cornett’s innovative views on learning are portrayed in “Professor Norman Cornett,” a documentary by Alanis Obomsawin, one of Canada’s most distinguished filmmakers. The National Film Board of Canada released the film in 2009, and it now screens in universities throughout North America and Europe. Immediately after the showing at MU, Professor Cornett will lead a “dialogic” discussion with audience members, fielding questions and speaking about his unique vision for education.

Date

Monday, November 2, 2015

Time

4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Where

The Multnomah University campus, classroom L101

Cost

THIS EVENT IS FREE and OPEN to the public, including all MU students, staff and faculty.

More about Professor Cornett

A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a BA with distinction in history, Norman Cornett came of age amidst the counterculture fervor of the ’60s. He completed a PhD. in church history at McGill University, going on to teach there for 15 years as a lecturer in the Faculty of Religious Studies. Employing creative learning methods, he used his courses to address complex issues ranging from palliative care and jazz improvisation to First Nations history and Afghanistan. Professor Cornett lives in Québec, Canada. Learn more about him on his website.

Students experience the power of service, prayer

The sky was blue and full of sunshine on September 29 as the busyness of the day unfolded. On Multnomah’s campus, about 30 graduate and seminary students were gathering for Day of Prayer. Off campus, 150 undergraduate students were serving the neighboring community for Day of Outreach.

DoO_02

'A great connector'

Once every fall and spring, undergraduate students volunteer at several locations in the Portland community. A volunteer site can be anywhere: a nonprofit, a community center, a school. Even a MAX station. MU cancels classes for the day so students can devote their whole morning to service.

The commuters waiting to ride the nearby MAX Light Rail brightened up as Multnomah students offered them steaming cups of coffee and fresh donuts. Freshman Megan Flikkema loved the opportunity to brush shoulders with people she wouldn’t normally meet.

“It’s a great connector,” she said. “It’s an easy way to pass out breakfast and talk about Jesus.” Flikkema was right: Many students took time to engage in meaningful conversations with people they encountered, listening intently to their life stories.

Summit student Trevor Grant saw Day of Outreach as a way to respond: “In the last three months, I’ve really been convicted about how much we’re called to help out in the community,” said the freshman. “So [Day of Outreach] is good timing.”

DoO_04

'Faith without works is nothing'

Not far down the road from the MAX station, another group of students wandered through the Montavilla neighborhood, praying for their neighbors while they searched for trash littering the yards, gutters and sidewalks. Although a seemingly small act, the residents responded positively. One man even hollered his sincere thanks from his car before turning onto the busy street.

“It’s important, especially at Multnomah, to get out into the community,” said Brittany Bowling, a business and organizational psychology major.

Hebrew major Darren Warren stuffed some litter from the street gutter into a large plastic bag. “Faith without works is nothing,” said the freshman. “Being the hands and feet of God is precisely what God is all about.” You could tell Warren meant every word — he looked eager to support the event’s mission.

DoO_01

'God weaves our stories'

Back on campus, graduate and seminary students were gathered together for a morning of prayer and fellowship. Daytime classes were cancelled so students could step back from studies and set aside time dedicated to seeking God. The quaint and quiet prayer chapel proved to be the perfect setting for the event.

Master of Divinity student Aimee Pahl was the organizer for Day of Prayer. She was deeply encouraged by what took place during the prayer time, and was especially impressed by students’ vulnerability as they lifted each other’s requests to the Lord. “[God] weaves our stories so that we understand each other, especially when we’re praying for one another,” she said.

The three-hour prayer session brought Kā‘ili Wells some much needed peace. “I just needed to reconnect with God,” said the seminary student. “I needed worshipful, prayerful rest.” Wells also mentioned the importance of creating a time and a place for seminary and graduate students to come together; with their schedules, it can be easy for them to become exclusive.

Although there has been a lot going on in Wells' life, he left Day of Prayer feeling refreshed. “It’s funny, because I’m tired,” he said, chuckling. “But I also feel rejuvenated.” The power of prayer does some amazing things.

Watch the 2015 All College Retreat video

Comments Off Written on September 15th, 2015 by
Categories: Events, Students

Every fall, MU students kick off the semester with a weekend getaway at Washington Family Ranch. The retreat is a perfect opportunity to glean wisdom from a medley of speakers, make new friends, and jump start the school year with a whole lot of fun. A big thanks to our Student Life team, who were instrumental in making this retreat a wonderful experience for everyone involved!

MU is hosting this free event in June. Register today.

What

We're sponsoring an opportunity to hear from some well-respected speakers MU has brought in for its Doctor of Ministry and Master of Arts in Applied Theology programs.

This free lectureship series is open to the general public and geared toward ministry practitioners.

Guest speakers will share about their unique ministries and what they see as relevant for the local church in our current culture and context. Space is still available. Register today.

Where

The JCA Student Center on Multnomah University's campus

When and Who

Tuesday, June 2

Dr. Ron Frost is presenting on “A Love-Centered Approach to Cultural Engagement.” Frost serves missionaries and ministries across the globe through Barnabas International as a pastoral care consultant. He also taught historical theology and ethics at Multnomah Biblical Seminary for several years.

Thursday, June 4

Dr. Kumar Abraham will discuss bearing witness as a Christian in majority Hindu, Muslim or restricted access countries. Abraham has served as a missionary in the Philippines for twenty-one years. Today he equips Christ-followers, trains evangelists and lectures.

Tuesday, June 9

Andrea Smith will speak on “Gospel Witness: Beyond Colonialism.” Smith is Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at University of California at Riverside. She is also co-founder of Incite! Women of Color Against Violence.

Wednesday, June 10

Dr. Mark DeYmaz will talk about “Real Community Transformation: From Rhetoric to Results for the Glory of God.” DeYmaz is the founding pastor of Mosaic Church of Central Arkansas. He is passionate about catalyzing the movement toward multi-ethnic churches throughout North America and beyond.

Thursday, June 11

John Stewart will talk about what apologetics looks like in a multi-faith environment and seek to answer the question: In a relational dialogue with our neighbors, how is apologetics expressed and lived out? Stewart is a practicing attorney in Southern California and the international director at Ratio Christi, an apologetics ministry.

Time

Each lecture will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Register today.

Highlighting God’s blessings

"Give praise to the Lord, proclaim his name; make known among the nations what he has done, and proclaim that his name is exalted. Sing to the Lord, for he has done glorious things; let this be known to all the world." Isaiah 12:4-5

Why are we praising God and proclaiming his glory over the whole earth? Why are we rejoicing at Multnomah? There are a host of reasons! God has had his hand of blessing upon us this year, and I want to share some highlights with you. You can also get more details at multnomah.edu/new.

Accounting concentration

studying_featureimageIn fall 2015, MU will launch an accounting concentration under its business program that will prepare students for employment in the field of accounting as well as ready them for the Certified Management Accountant Exam and the Certified Fraud Examiner Exam.

Business & Organizational Psychology degree

MU will launch a business & organizational psychology degree in fall 2015. Graduates will utilize their training to create business policies and methodologies with the goal of improving an organization’s ability to better meet the expectations of its customers and stakeholders.

Biology degree

MU plans to offer a biology degree in fall 2016. More details to come.

Global Studies degree

MU’s intercultural studies program was recently renamed the global studies program. Students will specialize in one of four new concentrations:

  • Applied Linguistics
  • Children at Risk
  • Culture & Diversity
  • Global Ministry

Summit (a five-year B.A./M.Div. program)

Multnomah is launching Summit, a five-year Bachelor of Arts/Master of Divinity program. Summit students will save more than $41,000 in tuition, cut their time in school by two years and receive a Summit Scholarship.

Fully online undergraduate and seminary degrees

Starting in fall 2015, MU will be offering the following programs fully online:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology
  • Master of Arts in Biblical Studies
  • Master of Arts in Theological Studies

AAOT acceptance

The Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree now satisfies all MU freshman and sophomore general education requirements.

NAIA approval

The Lions have joined the Cascade Collegiate Conference (CCC), which is considered to be one of the top small-college athletic associations in the country. The CCC is a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). Each year, more than 60,000 student-athletes in the NAIA compete in 13 sports and 23 national championships.

Track and field

Multnomah will launch a track and field program in spring of 2016. More details to come.

Thank you

We couldn’t have done any of these things without you. I want to personally thank you for your generous support. Your prayers, service and offerings strengthen Multnomah’s impact every day.

Matching gift

Multnomah was blessed by an anonymous friend wanting to broaden our support base by matching $2 for every $1 given by first-time givers or lapsed givers (those who have not given in over a year). Our friend will donate up to $400,000.

We’ve almost met our match

Today we are shy of this goal by just $41,896. We are calling everyone to pray and seek God’s will for what their gift of participation could be. Will you join us?

A gift of any size, according to your ability, is all God asks of you. Every gift matters. We invite you to share in this joy of giving to God’s exciting work at Multnomah!

I hope you have a blessed summer.

Craig

Rev. G. Craig Williford, Ph.D.
President