Faculty

Dr. Derek Chinn selected as interim dean of Multnomah Biblical Seminary

Comments Off on Dr. Derek Chinn selected as interim dean of Multnomah Biblical Seminary Written on July 18th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Seminary

Derek-Chin

PORTLAND, Ore. – Multnomah University is pleased to announce that Dr. Derek Chinn will serve as interim dean of Multnomah Biblical Seminary.

Chinn, who directs the seminary’s Doctor of Ministry program, will assume his new role August 1. “I’m looking forward to putting new initiatives in motion based on the upcoming strategic plan,” Chinn said. “I’ll work closely with my colleagues to pursue what God is calling Multnomah to be in our rapidly changing society.”

MU President Dr. G. Craig Williford said Chinn has the professional background and personal qualities needed to excel in the position. “Dr. Chinn’s expertise and experience in pastoral, organizational and academic leadership will serve him well as he leads MBS during this season of growth and expansion,” Williford said. “He is well respected by his peers, and I look forward to having him serve on the senior leadership team.”

Chinn has extensive experience as a pastor in the Portland area. He also serves as director of Ministry Dynamics, a local nonprofit that provides organizational and fundraising support to ministries and individuals. He holds BA and BS degrees from UC-Irvine, an MBA from the University of Oregon, an MDiv from Multnomah Biblical Seminary and a DMin from Western Seminary.

Chinn takes over for Dr. Roy Andrews, who served as dean of the seminary for the past three years.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with an additional teaching site in Reno, Nevada. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

Contact: Steve Cummings, Vice President of Advancement
503.251.6464 or scummings@multnomah.edu

Global ministry trends and issues, part one: Discerning the times in global mission

Comments Off on Global ministry trends and issues, part one: Discerning the times in global mission Written on July 18th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Theology

This is the first post in a series of articles on global ministry trends and issues presented by Dr. Greg Burch, Director of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program and Chair of the Global Studies Department. You can read more articles from Dr. Burch on his personal site, The Burch Blog.

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Taken from the El Cristo statue in Bolivia, looking out onto the city of Cochabamba.

Over the next eight weeks, I will be presenting some of the current movements and trends within global mission efforts today. As contexts of mission shift, theory and practice must also keep up the pace. A primary motif within current mission literature seeks to understand current issues and trends in the field. One thing that must not change is the theological basis to global mission. Theology and mission must be closely tied as we re-consider and reconfigure what we mean by global mission in an age of radical change. Too frequently in the past, our theologies have remained dormant and detached from social realities. And likewise, mission has been divorced from a strong theological foundation, manifested, in some cases, more like a social service disconnected from God’s central purpose in building his kingdom. When this all happens, “The result is a theology divorced from human realities and a missiology that lacks theological foundations” (Paul Hiebert 38).

There are a number of shifts taking place in global mission today. Strategies and approaches will need to be assessed to keep up with current events. One example from this past week is the new Russian law that prevents one from sharing his or her faith outside of a church or religious building (including online and in residential buildings). The new law, which was attached to anti-terrorism amendments, goes into effect on Wednesday, July 20. (For more on this law see Forum 18 – a local news source in the region.) How should mission organizations and others deeply concerned about growing God’s kingdom respond? What is the best approach to missional activity in such a restricted context?

Other issues we will consider in the coming weeks are new mission terms. Even historic and traditional ways of describing mission are being debated. The issue of nomenclatures and mission program titles has, as of recent, been included in mission conferences and frequently debated in recent works. Take, for example, the recent American Society of Missiology’s annual meeting (2015) and the Professor of Mission conference as they discussed such topics as Missio-logoi: The Many Languages of Mission and What’s in a Name? Assessing Mission Studies Program Titles. These are current issues that are reflective of the changes taking place in the field. Even our own mission program at Multnomah recently went through some significant changes. See Global Studies for more on MU’s own experience with this topic.

Andrew Kirk writes from a conciliar position on mission as he explores the need to incorporate a broad missiological foundation that includes mission to the poor, creation care, contextualization, social justice, pluralism, violence and peacemaking, and global partnerships. In his proposal, he suggests that mission be inclusive of a broad range of issues (24, 28-29). One of the stronger emphases noted in the writings of Kirk is how many of Jesus’ friends were indeed outsiders. The poor, with whom Jesus associated, were much more than those who did not own property; rather, they were people who had been intentionally disadvantaged and forbidden to enter into the life of civil society. They were forced to become powerless to make any difference in society (48). Given the place of the poor and marginalized in Scripture, they will be a primary motif in the coming weeks as well.

As we discuss trends and movements within global mission today, we must remember that mission knowledge is built upon the past and mission praxis is built upon the present. This review will seek to keep an eye on both.

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The Mohammad Al-Amin Mosque in Beirut, Lebanon.

Works Cited

Hiebert, Paul. “Missiological Education for a Global Era.” In Missiological Education for the 21st Century: The Book, the Circle and the Sandals, edited by Edgar J. Elliston, Charles Van Engen and J. Dudley Woodberry. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1996. Print.

Kirk, Andrew. What Is Mission? Theological Explorations. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2000.

MU professor co-leads pastoral conference in Malawi, Africa

Comments Off on MU professor co-leads pastoral conference in Malawi, Africa Written on May 20th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Missions, Pray For MU, Theology

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MU professor Roger Trautmann will be conducting the Pastors’ Enrichment Conference in Malawi, East Africa May 24-25. Trautmann, along with  Carl Palmer from Global Training Network, was chosen by the Luis Palau Association to lead the event, which will draw nearly 800 pastors.

Many African church leaders face a startling deficit of biblical and pastoral training, which is exactly what promoted the Luis Palau Association to launch a leadership conference for local pastors. “In East Africa, pastors have little access to good training,” says Trautmann, who will be teaching on topics such as Bible study methods and the Pastoral Epistles. But lack of preparation doesn’t mean lack of motivation. “I’ve met pastors who’ve started 20 churches, and they’ve never had any official training,” he adds.

Although Trautmann has taught at this conference once before, he’s been conducting workshops for pastors in Tanzania, Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda and Burkina Faso for many years. “They’re hungry for good training,” he says. “That’s why I’ve been participating since 1994.”

During the conference, please pray that God would give both Trautmann and Palmer Christ’s wisdom as they teach and His power as they work to strengthen the Church in Africa. Pray also that the pastors and leaders in attendance would be encouraged and challenged during this powerful outreach.

 

Multnomah students make dorm life their business

Comments Off on Multnomah students make dorm life their business Written on May 19th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Programs, Students

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Marketing professor Michael Hohn doesn’t like fake case studies. He prefers bringing the curriculum to life by instigating legitimate projects with real impact. That’s exactly what his Sales and Marketing class did last semester.

Director of Student Life Kim Stave “hired” Hohn’s class to help her department answer an important question: How can Multnomah University increase occupancy in the dorms? The business majors divided into three teams to create a value proposition, conduct research, gather data and analyze their findings. This allowed them to offer evidence-based recommendations to their client.

“As we worked on the project, it was awesome to see how we were immediately able to apply what we were learning in class,” says business student Valerie Wakefield.

Her classmate Robbie Miller concurs. “Our business classes taught us that we’d need extensive and thorough research to do a good job on this project.”

The amount of data they gathered even kept Hohn on his toes. “It was the most memorable of any projects that I can remember!” he says.

After administering a competitive analysis, Miller and his team came up with a few proposals to make dorm life more attractive, such as planning more student events on campus and adding a new communal student area. “A long-term goal is to create a space for students to gather other than the JCA,” Miller explains. “It’d be a space where people would walk to and not walk through.”

At the culmination of their work, the students presented their findings to the judges, a group of faculty and staff members, including Business Department Chair Lee Sellers and Multnomah University President Craig Williford. The teams were judged on the depth and scope of their research as well as the quality of their recommendations. The group with the winning proposal was awarded dinner at Portland City Grill with Sellers, Williford and Stave.

Although the students are young in their careers, Stave and her department found their work extremely helpful. “Our students are intelligent and creative, and they came up with some ideas that we will certainly consider implementing,” says Stave. “The fact that all three groups, each approaching the project from a different angle, came to some of the same conclusions was significant to me.”

The students feel confident that the experience afforded them important skills for their future jobs. “This project was good practice on how to communicate well with group members and stay on the same page,” says Miller.

Wakefield agrees. “I was able to practice skills that are useful in most any profession,” she says. “I’ve even applied some things we learned in my everyday interactions!”

Spring graduates reflect on time well spent

Comments Off on Spring graduates reflect on time well spent Written on May 9th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Students

Last Friday, 115 Multnomah students walked across the stage of Rolling Hills Community Church to receive their diplomas. Among them were Abigail Buckley, Brian Hall, Mandee Campos, Dae Kim, Nancy Anderson and Santino Cantalupo, six students who picked up much more than a quality education at MU. They took some time to reflect on what they’ve learned, how they’ve changed and where they plan to go next.

Abigail Buckley

Abigail BuckleyHometown
Vancouver, Wash.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a minor in History

Favorite MU experience
Probably being a student worker. It made me feel more informed about the school. I started in Financial Aid, then worked as Dr. Scalberg’s teacher’s assistant, and then I worked in Advancement. They all took care of me and understood that my homework came first. It was really fun – I loved my time as a student worker.

Favorite class
Oh, but there are so many! Prophets with Dr. Josberger and History and Poetry with Dr. Koivisto were both great, and so was History and Christianity with Dr. Scalberg. In History and Christianity, we saw how different movements and authors affected the shape of evangelicalism. We traced back our own influences. It shows you where you come from, and you learn how denominations and people groups brought you together.

Favorite thing about MU
The relationships the professors build with their students. I feel pretty confident saying every student has one teacher they can look back on – someone who cared for them personally. I’m not going to necessarily remember the classes, but I’m going to remember who taught the classes.

Favorite thing about Portland
It’s central to so many places. If you want to go to the beach or the mountains for the day, you can do that. Whatever you like to do, you can find it.

Plans after graduation
I’m going to keep on teaching. (She currently teaches Spanish 1-3 to high school students at Cedar Tree Classical Christian School in Ridgefield, Wash.) I’m so grateful for the opportunity.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I took Senior Theology this semester with Dr. Gurney. You have to write eight doctrinal statements. It was daunting at first and rather intimidating. Not only do you have to write on what you believe, but you also have to find the scripture to back it up. For that reason alone, MU taught me not to shy away from issues. The professors are willing to bring up issues and foster an environment where it’s safe to talk about them.

Advice to your first-year self
I didn’t do as many on-campus and off-campus activities because I was a commuter and worked in the evening. Your experience here is what you make it. I wish I had taken advantage of getting to know more of the people here. You have a short amount of time, and it goes fast.

Brian Hall

Brian HallHometown
Yucca Valley, Calif.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a second major in Youth Ministry

Favorite MU experience
Learning how to do ministry with my wife. We met during our freshman year and got married that first summer. The education that I received from MU was great, but the experience of being able to do ministry as newlyweds with the Hildebrands as role models has been invaluable.

Favorite class
Out of all the classes I’ve taken at MU, there are two that have stood out: Spiritual Formation of Youth with Dr. Rob Hildebrand and Mission with Children at Risk with Dr. Greg Burch.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love living in the city! I come from a town where the fanciest restaurant is Applebee’s and the only things to do are walk around Walmart or go to the four-screen movie theater. I love having the city at my fingertips! The food is great here, and there are always things to do!

Favorite thing about MU
The youth ministry program. In-class education is really only a small part of the degree. The opportunities that Rob provides to go to Germany or Japan, or to work on Spring Thaw, is what really makes this education so unique and practical.

Plans after graduation
I am planning on pursuing my Master of Arts in Christian Leadership with an emphasis in Counseling and Care at Multnomah Biblical Seminary.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
Before coming to MU, my knowledge of the Bible was limited to the classic Bible stories like Adam and Eve, David and Goliath, Jesus, etc. It seemed like a series of random stories were just thrown into one bigger book. The Bible classes here have taught me that the Bible is one whole story. This has impacted my spiritual journey by opening my eyes to the plan that God does have for my life. I may feel like I’m wandering in the desert, but I know that there’s a promise for me up ahead.

Advice to your first-year self
Take advantage of your time at Multnomah. Don’t just be here for the degree. Your teachers have so much to offer you outside of the classroom setting, but they’ll only be able to offer it to you if you start the conversation. Hone your strengths while you’re here too. Again, don’t just be here for the degree. A piece of paper isn’t going to teach you to study the Bible, prepare a sermon or build a life-sized Mario Kart track.

Mandee Campos

Mandee CamposHometown
Beaverton, Ore. (I’ve lived in a lot of places, but Beaverton is probably my favorite.)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Best MU experience
I liked being in a cohort and sharing experiences with them. It’s neat to share in the journey. I enjoyed the Bible prerequisites – there were many mind-blowing moments.

Favorite class
I struggle to pick a favorite class, so I’ll go with most impactful: Theology of Cultural Engagement with Dr. Metzger. It was a good foundation to begin working from a Trinitarian perspective.

Favorite thing about MU
With all the seminary professors and theology professors you have, I really like that everyone isn’t saying the same thing – they each say things that put tension on what the others have said. I think that’s a good thing because you get to see different perspectives.

Favorite thing about Portland
The food. You can get almost any type of food. I love Chinese and Indian and Thai. Food is the best way to understand and relate to one another.

Plans after graduation
I’m working with a nonprofit called Lahash International that partners with grassroots initiatives in East Africa. I’ll be working as the Servant Teams Coordinator.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This program especially has taught me to listen well to people, to affirm their dignity. When you’re in fellowship with people, you’ll learn a lot about faith and about God that you wouldn’t otherwise. If you want to see Jesus, be in relation with people outside of your context. That’s how he did it in scripture.

Advice to your first-year self
Always seek to learn from a given situation. Some people take for granted a privilege they’ve been given. Much of the world wasn’t given the opportunities we’ve been given. Believers are called to seek excellence, so be willing to learn and learn well.

Dae Kim

Dae KimHometown
Northern Virginia (I moved around a lot)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Favorite MU experience
We had an event last semester every Thursday where we’d take turns sharing our testimony. Sharing my testimony and listening to others throughout the semester was a great experience. We’d pray for one another.

Favorite class
Hmmm. Last year, I took Conflict, Refugees and Complex Disasters with Dr. Karen Fancher. My heart is for the Middle East. She talked a lot about Syrian and Sudanese refugees. I’m not necessarily critical of what I hear, but after this class, I learned to become more critical, and I researched more on certain topics. What the media shares doesn’t give us the whole picture. Whatever they say is pretty biased, so I want to hear different angles. This was a big takeaway.

Favorite thing about MU
I was impressed that professors connect issues with Jesus Christ. Sometimes people think Christians just praise God on Sundays. But here, professors connect the Bible with every subject, and they ask what it means to follow Jesus in this messy world. It’s a unique thing MU has to offer.

Plans after graduation
First of all, I’m going to China on May 31 for one month– I’ve already bought the ticket. I really have a heart for the Middle East, so I’ll also be connecting with organizations in Lebanon. Right now I’m talking to an organization in Egypt about an internship in August. I’m also working on joining the Peace Corps; if that works out, I’ll be in Albania for two years too.

How has MU impacted your spiritual journey
I’ve met many spiritual mentors here. People I’ve gotten to know through my professors, my friends, my cohort. They’re always praying for me. Nothing in my future is for sure, but I trust God. There were times I was struggling with theological issues. But since my time at MU, I’ve learned fellowship is really important.

Nancy Anderson

Nancy AndersonHometown
Portland, Ore.

Program
Master of Divinity, Chaplaincy Track

Favorite MU experience
Interacting with fellow students in an academic and spiritual journey. Most students were an average of 30 years younger than me, but they welcomed me into their lives and were so encouraging and friendly.

Favorite class
Are you kidding? I loved every single one, although some were more challenging than others. The Spiritual Warfare class with Dr. Calvin Blom was a standout for the excellent combination of theology and practical application. But honestly, each class was unique and special. Dr. Stephen Kim’s Bible Survey classes were awesome, and Dr. Baylis and Dr. Metzger are brilliant instructors.

Favorite thing about MU
I love the way that professors allowed us to tailor the learning experience to our personal ministry situations. I was often allowed to adapt assignments to my world of working with the elderly in assisted living, which made the learning experience more meaningful.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love that we have both the ocean experience and mountains available for vacations and exploration. God has blessed my husband and me with 45 years living here as a married couple.

Plans after graduation
Focus on better message preparation for Sunday worship as I continue my ministry as a chaplain in an assisted living community – Hearthstone of Beaverton. I came to Multnomah to become a better-equipped chaplain.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This was the time of learning that I needed to launch myself into a deeper walk with the Lord. I have always loved the Lord, but my faith has been strengthened and deepened by being at Multnomah. I have a far better understanding of the Word of God too.

Advice to your first-year self
Relax and trust God to give you all you need. Yes, do your part and pay attention in class, take good notes, do homework on time, work ahead on the big projects, and then trust God to make your brain work!

Santino Cantalupo

Santino CantalupoHometown
Reno, Nev.

Program
Master of Divinity

Favorite MU experience
Coming up for a summer intensive and getting out of a class early and climbing to the top of Multnomah Falls at the suggestion of my professor. It was a beautiful hike and allowed me to connect with God’s creation.

Favorite class
Preaching Narrative Literature

Favorite thing about MU
I love the opportunity that MU has given to distance students, especially to the growing student base in Reno, Nev.

Plans after graduation
I feel called to lead a church as a senior pastor, and I’m pursuing my Doctor of Ministry degree at Duke.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I have grown more spiritually during my time in seminary than any other time in my life. This journey has been strenuous and at times filled with suffering and loss, but often it was a conversation with a professor or a student that allowed me to refocus my eyes on Christ.

Advice to your first-year self
Never take a theology class and a Bible class at the same time. Ever.

A tale of two forests: MU prof reflects on forest regeneration in honor of Earth Day

Comments Off on A tale of two forests: MU prof reflects on forest regeneration in honor of Earth Day Written on April 18th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty

Dr. Keith Swenson, professor of natural sciences, shares some fascinating thoughts on forest regeneration in honor of Earth Day, celebrated nationally on April 22.

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There still seems to be a common understanding within some circles that Earth Day and Christians don’t mix. Is this perception flawed? Let’s consider two of our great western forests.

I remember when Mount St. Helens blew. That was 36 years ago. Our family was on the Oregon coast that beautiful Sunday morning, so we didn’t witness the initial blast. But as we drove home to Portland later in the day, we saw an eruption plume rising 60,000 feet over the volcano. Later we began to learn the full extent of that day’s eruptive activity and its effects on people, landscapes and the region as a whole.

Certainly the great forest surrounding Mount St. Helens did not escape the volcanic maelstrom. Instead of producing an upward column of ash, St. Helens’ first salvo surprisingly was sideways, directly over the forest to the north. This oven-hot “stonewind,” as it was called, spread outward, producing a fan-shaped area of destruction, later named the “blast zone.” In the space of only three minutes, 230 square miles of old-growth and plantation forest was “disturbed” (to use the language of ecology) to an extreme degree. Days later, scientists observing the monotonous gray desolation, exuded dire predictions concerning the forest’s return to life. Many called it a “sterile landscape,” predicting it would be at least decades before significant recovery occurred.

But a surprise awaited! The forest began recovering from its destruction much more rapidly than prophesied. Within three years, 90% of the forest’s plant species were back and much of the animal life as well. It appeared that the forest ecosystem was equipped with mechanisms enabling it to rapidly react to cataclysmic disturbance. In ecology, an ecosystem’s ability to respond to a disturbance is termed “resilience,” and the blast zone forest at Mount St. Helens proved itself to be highly resilient.

But is an ecosystem’s resilience bounded by limits? Can humans, for example, do whatever they wish — or think best — to a forest, assured that it will bounce back? Could a forest be highly resilient and yet somewhat fragile at the same time? Let’s consider a second forest.

In 1910, a seminal event catapulted the U.S. Forest Service into national prominence. That event was a great wildfire in the northern Rockies of Montana and Idaho, usually referred to simply as the “fire of 1910,” or the “big burn.” In the span of 48 hours, three million acres of prime western white pine forest was incinerated, along with human lives and property, including the mining town of Wallace, Idaho. The fire was so monstrous that it got the attention of the nation. Something had to be done to protect our forests from fire. That job fell to the fledgling Forest Service, which over the better part of the twentieth century attempted to prevent forest fires – with some measure of success. Fires on the public lands of the West were markedly contained, but at what cost?

Through careful scientific study, much more has been learned about forest fire in more recent years. For many forests, fire is as essential for their health as good soil and adequate rain. Periodic fires control the buildup of brush and other forest fuels, provide a needed pulse of nutrients into the soil and enables certain tree species, including Douglas-fir, to regenerate. Oregon State University forest ecologist David Perry puts it this way: “We now know that fire played a crucial ecological role in these systems, and its removal set in motion a chain of events that wrecked the health of forests throughout the region, increasing their susceptibility to insects and pathogens, and making them vulnerable to fires that are much more destructive (and difficult to control) than we fought to exclude.”

So, on this Earth Day, how should we view our relationship to our forests that are sufficiently resilient to rebound, but fragile enough to degrade from decades of fire suppression? The Bible provides some guidance.  First, it tells us that the “earth is the Lord’s” (Psalm 24:1). He created it, and He owns it. But to our first parents (and to all mankind) God gave dominion over His creation – a mandate to “rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air . . .  and over all the creatures that move along the ground” (Genesis 1:26). It’s clear now that Christians and Earth Day do mix. But how are we supposed to successfully rule over the fish of the sea (like Pacific Salmon), the birds of the air (Osprey) and creatures that move along the ground (Red-legged Frogs) today when all these creatures are dependent on healthy Northwest forests?

Dave Perry suggests the following: “Avoiding similar disasters in the future will take more than good intentions (those early foresters had the best of intentions); it will require knowledge” (emphasis mine). I see an implicit requirement in God’s dominion mandate to scientifically study the creation He’s given us (such as forest ecosystems) in order to understand it and thereby successfully manage it for His glory – and the benefit of mankind. We will never do that perfectly, but we can do it better.

EDITOR NOTE:

  • “Mount St. Helens” is always written with an abbreviation for “saint.” The Baron of St. Helens, for whom the mountain is named, is said to have been so humble he never wanted “saint” in his title spelled out.
  • Reference on the Dave Perry quotes:  David A. Perry, Forest Ecosystems (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994), p.9

Seminary students selected third year in a row for internships at Oxford

Comments Off on Seminary students selected third year in a row for internships at Oxford Written on March 30th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Programs, Seminary, Students

The polished halls of Oxford University have been steeped in centuries’ worth of scholarly culture. Their crevices contain manuscripts, statues, engravings and echoes of the past. What better place for world-renowned biblical experts and students to gather?

For the third year in a row, a handful of Multnomah seminary students has been selected to attend the Logos Conference, a two-week internship in June sponsored by the Scholars Initiative. Any students who have worked on Scholars Initiative projects are invited to apply to the workshop. Scholars from more than 60 schools in North America submit applications, but only 30 students are chosen for the trip.

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 ‘Shocked and overjoyed’

Oxford3_blogChad Woodward had his eyes on Oxford ever since his classmate Daniel Somboonsiri was selected two years ago. “It was a goal I’d set for myself,” Woodward says. “I was on the edge of my seat waiting, and when I heard I was chosen, I felt validated as a Hebrew scholar.”

Alyssa Schmidt is equally enthusiastic. “I’m really excited to be around people who are passionate about God’s word, and to have so much opportunity for learning within two short weeks,” she says.

Ruben Alvarado received his invitation two weeks later than his classmates. He thought he hadn’t made it in. When he finally heard the news, he was ecstatic. “I couldn’t sleep that night,” he says. “I was shocked and overjoyed.”

 ‘Engaging and exploring’

Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz encouraged Woodward, Alvarado and Schmidt to apply for the intership. “We really enjoy our students and are proud of them,” he says. Kutz will join his students at Oxford for three days of the conference.

The conference schedule is packed with activity. There will be excursions to Winchester Abbey and Tyndale House, evensong services at Christ Cathedral, lectures from renowned scholars, tours to the Bodlian and Parker Libraries, and discussions around pots of tea. Guests will even be lodging in an ivy-cloaked Victorian house up the lane.

“This seminar is helpful for two reasons,” Kutz says. “First, students will be able build friendships with peers in the same position. Second, they will be exposed to key scholars who have figured out what it’s like to live as a Christian in the academic world.”

Dr. Rebekah Josberger, who teaches Hebrew at Multnomah, is thrilled to see how her students will grow through this opportunity. “Learning isn’t about ‘arriving’ and knowing everything,” she says. “It’s about engaging, asking questions and exploring. This all happens at the conference.”

Needless to say, this environment of exploration will boost the future careers of attendees. “It’s continued exposure to what I love and enjoy,” Woodward says. “It will bring my studies to a different level.”

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 ‘A community of excellent teachers’

All three students are brimming with praise for the quality of Multnomah’s Hebrew program. “Our professors have created a program that’s different,” says Schmidt. “It’s not just classes, but a community of excellent teachers.”

Kutz prioritizes time with his students during the trip. While other professors wander off on their own adventures, he joins his group in a pub to discuss the highlights of the conference.

“The Hebrew community is a family,” says Woodward. “It’s not just instructive; professors take an active role in our lives and come alongside us as friends.”

Alvarado wholeheartedly concurs. “It’s been the experience of a lifetime to study under Dr. Kutz and Dr. Josberger,” he says. “They teach us the language and teach us how to live life.”

Although the two weeks are crammed with scholastics, MU students are also looking forward to sightseeing. Schmidt will be stopping by Paris on her way home. Alvarado will visit several of London’s tourist attractions like the British Museum, the Tower of London and the National Gallery.

Woodward is planning to take full advantage of the international experience. It’s his 10th wedding anniversary, and he just bought a plane ticket for his wife so they can explore England together after the conference. “It will be a good balance between work and play,” he says. Cheers to that.

MU to launch biology program in fall 2016

Comments Off on MU to launch biology program in fall 2016 Written on March 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Programs

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Multnomah University’s new biology program will open the door to an array of career options for students who are serious about faith and science.

The four-year program will offer a major and a minor, along with an optional emphasis in science education for those considering a career in secondary education. In addition to core classes, students will explore non-science disciplines and interdisciplinary courses to broaden their scope of education. This will provide a smooth transition into a chosen occupation, or into graduate or professional health schools.

“I’m excited that our students will be able to prepare for graduate studies in medical, dental and veterinary doctoral programs,” says Admissions Counselor Becca Ovall. “MU students are passionate about serving others, and this program opens up new avenues to do so in the health field.”

Dr. Daniel Scalberg, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, couldn’t agree more. “God gave humans the custodial care of creation,” he says. “We need to task people to take care of it.”

The interactive courses will allow students to explore their interests down to the molecular level, while devoted faculty will provide insight for potential careers and give students the in-depth knowledge they need to excel as professionals in their chosen fields. The combination of lab research and biblical and theological studies will complement the integration of faith and learning in the arts and sciences tradition.

“There doesn’t need to be a war between faith and science,” says Scalberg. “Rather, there should be a partnership in knowing about and worshipping the Creator.”

Ovall concurs. “Our biology program will include a depth of faith integration that’s hard to find elsewhere,” she says.  “Because our students complete a substantive core of Bible and theology courses, they’ll bring a level of biblical competence to their studies that will broaden their understanding of biology.”

This integration is something that motivates Dr. Sarah Gall, who will join Multnomah faculty on June 1 as associate professor of biology. “I think deeply about my faith and how to conduct scientific research to the glory of God,” she says. “I look forward to working at a university that encourages students to contemplate how their faith and vocation can be integrated coherently.”

Gall, who received her Ph.D. in Molecular Cell Biology from Washington University School of Medicine, will be teaching a number of biology subjects at MU, including microbiology, anatomy and physiology, genetics, immunology, human biology, and senior student biology research. She says she’s looking forward to joining an institution that takes integration of faith and learning seriously.

The reaction to the announcement of the biology major has been very positive. “So far, there has been an overwhelming influx of response,” says Admissions Counselor Ashley Sikorski. “We’re fielding phone calls, applications and emails from students who are reaching out to us since they heard the news. By making biology available, we can prepare the next generation of Christian doctors and scientists with a rigorous core of solid values and applicable skills for the workplace.”

MU launches online version of MA in Global Development and Justice program

Comments Off on MU launches online version of MA in Global Development and Justice program Written on February 11th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Programs

Multnomah University has launched an online version of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice (MAGDJ) program. The 18-month program will kick off with two weeks in Rwanda, where students will take their first two courses, embark on study tours and connect with practitioners. All subsequent courses will be taken online, and students will take two eight-week courses at a time.

“I’m excited about the opportunity to be face to face with students at the beginning of the program,” says MAGDJ Director Dr. Greg Burch. “This contextual residency will provide time for cohort members to get to know one another and begin developing the community we envision for the online portion of this educational experience.”

Burch proposed the blended program so students who weren’t able to join MU’s on-campus cohorts could still earn the MAGDJ degree. “The blended program allows for us to pull in students from around the globe who are passionate about global justice and community development,” he says. “We hope to create a strong community as we wrestle together with complex issues that need carefully crafted solutions to bring lasting transformation.”

The first cohort is set to begin in July 2016. Burch is hoping for a good turnout. Things are looking promising: The new program has already sparked interest across the globe. “We’ve received inquiries about the blended program from practitioners in Colombia, India, Kenya, Rwanda and Lebanon,” says Burch. “They see the possibilities for acquiring a new set of skills that will take them to new heights.”

Burch says one of the main benefits prospective students recognize is that they don’t need to leave their work or family. “It can be difficult for global leaders to move to the U.S. or even to a new state,” he says. “This program allows them to stay where they are, keep a flexible schedule, and direct their research in very practical ways for their career and ministry.”

In the years ahead, Burch envisions the new program contributing to MU’s global campus by including students in developing nations. “With the help of Multnomah donors, we anticipate having a significant participation of underrepresented groups in this program,” he says. “We believe it will be necessary to provide significant scholarships, and we’re praying the Lord will provide for students who don’t have the economic means to pay.”

As the program continues to mature, Burch foresees adding contextual residency locations in Asia and Latin America.

To learn more about this program, visit multnomah.edu/blendedMAGDJ, or you can contact Dr. Greg Burch at gburch@multnomah.edu.

Nepal

Photo/Jonathan Isensee

Students reflect on blessings, thank MU givers

Comments Off on Students reflect on blessings, thank MU givers Written on November 6th, 2015 by
Categories: Faculty, Financial Aid, Students

As Thanksgiving approaches, we're taking time to remember all the blessings God has given us over the past year, including his amazing work through Multnomah givers.

At our recent Day of Thanks event, students signed a massive card dedicated to the Multnomah family members who generously donate their resources so men and women from around the world can receive a timeless education that equips them for careers in service to Jesus.

Thank you to all our wonderful givers! Your gifts really do change lives.