Pray For MU

Can We Get Some Prayer For Student Orientation?

Fall 2010 is here (even though it still feels like summer!). Students will be on campus for orientation and move in days the rest of this week. Undergrad Bible College students have orientation beginning on 8/26; Seminary on 8/27; and non-seminary Master's Programs already had theirs. Read the rest of this entry »

Question About Doctrine

We often get messages from people around the world asking questions about what we believe, or what our stance is on [insert your subject here]...below is a great example of one of those. President Dan Lockwood took a moment to answer.

The Question

The Multnomah Doctrinal Statement says "the Father has planned all that comes to pass." Could you please briefly clarify what this means? Read the rest of this entry »

Kigali Update 3

Comments Off Written on June 16th, 2010 by
Categories: Faculty, General, Missions, Pray For MU, Students

For the full context of this story, check out our posts tagged as Kigali. Or, if you already know, but want to get caught up on “Update 1“ or Update 2Read the rest of this entry »

Spring Thaw At Multnomah

Comments Off Written on April 12th, 2010 by
Categories: Faculty, General, Pray For MU, Students

If you've been on campus lately, you've likely seen the activity related to a great new youth event happening soon called Spring Thaw.

Put on by Dr. Rob Hildebrand and the Youth Ministry department at Multnomah Bible College, this event is shaping up to be a big deal!

Stay Updated

*UPDATE (3/7/2011): all the links to the Spring Thaw website were updated to the the new url.

New Wine, New Wineskins’ Spring Conference

Comments Off Written on April 7th, 2010 by
Categories: Faculty, General, Pray For MU, Seminary

(The following is a reprint of our press release - but since space is filling up fast at this event, we thought we should get something up right away!)

Multnomah Biblical Seminary's Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins will hold two seminars to promote unity in the church and outreach to the poor on April 9th and 10th, respectively. Together, these seminars make up the annual Spring conference that New Wine puts on in the community.

People often think caring for the poor in the analogy of giving a poor man fish to eat or teaching him to fish so he can eat forever. Neither approach moves beyond charity, which keeps the poor dependant and demeans their humanity. Instead, Christians must help the poor become entrepreneurs so that they can own the pond together.

An Evening of Inspiration, April 9th

At the introductory seminar, "An Evening of Inspiration: breaking down barriers", Dr. Paul Louis Metzger will discuss how the white church has historically failed to build a relationship with the black church. Together, Dr. Metzger and Dr. John M. Perkins will urge the church to long for unity and will lay the foundation of what "owning the pond together" means.

Owning the Pond Together, April 10th

The second seminar, "Owning the Pond Together: developing communities through entrepreneurship", suggests that community development involves partnering with the poor by thinking creatively and fostering micro-enterprise. The seminar stresses the importance for Christians to move beyond charity and toward cultivating community through effective business practices. In this way can Christians and the poor own the pond together and protect the community from being sold out to the highest bidder.

Perkins, Metzger, and Pastor Eric Bahme will present the importance of partnering with the poor and how to put "owning the pond" principles into practice.

Church Partnership

Following Perkins and Bahme's lead, churches can help form local enterprises that meet local needs and employ indigenous people by partnering with the poor, sharing skills and economic resources and investing capital so the poor will have ownership in the community. Churches can also become partners to foster business ownership among the local people.


Saturday, 3/20 System-Wide Network Outage

Comments Off Written on March 19th, 2010 by
Categories: General, Pray For MU

An excerpt from an email sent by our IT Director Brenda Gibson.

Please note, there will be a system wide outage of the Multnomah network as the IT Department performs a critical network upgrade.

  • Saturday, 3/20
  • Beginning @ 9:00 AM
  • May last as long as 5 hours

There will be no access to any Multnomah computer resources including:

  • This Blog you're reading right now
  • WiFi
  • Internet
  • Email
  • Self Service
  • The Y: and Z: drives 
  • Outlook Web Access
  • Multnomah Connect
  • Reno and Anchorage are affected as well
  • Any other MU hosted websites

We are hoping the outage will last no more than 5 hours and ask that you please plan accordingly.

We apologize for the inconvenience and ask that you join with us in prayer for a successful upgrade.

Thank you,

Brenda L. Gibson
Director of IT

Kigali Library Update

Comments Off Written on February 17th, 2010 by
Categories: Alumni, Books, Faculty, General, Missions, Pray For MU, Students

For those of you who have been involved with or following the Kigali Kollection story here - we have an update for you.

Get caught up on the full story of our partnership with Rwanda's Kigali Bible College and Africa New Life Ministries.

Let's Get 15,000

Africa New Life is planning to send all the books in a container from Portland on March 31.  We are now praying for a BIGGER and FASTER miracle. The goal of 15,000 books has still not been met!

Current book total:      13,592    (74 new books since last week!)

If any of you have books or know of anyone who does, then please get them to us by March 15th so they can make it on the container ship!



From The Archive: Dr. Dan’s New Semester Welcome

Comments Off Written on January 22nd, 2010 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Pray For MU, Students

This is an excerpt from a letter sent to donors who give to student aid and other student support causes.

January 31, 2008

Often in my letters, I like to paint a verbal picture of a student or alumnus, describing how Multnomah is impacting their life on campus right now or in God’s work around the world. At the beginning of a new year, however, let me present a mosaic of student voices to offer unique and encouraging perspectives on Multnomah’s role in shaping lives.

  • Kelsey Entz, a sophomore from Salem minoring in psychology, wanted an education that upheld biblical perspectives and imparted biblical values. For her, Multnomah is that place. She appreciates the sense of community, coupled with challenges to deepen her experience with God. “Multnomah is a place where we all share a common bond, a common mission in Christ,” she observes, “yet there is a diversity of student perspectives and experiences that enlarges my world view.”
  • A fifth semester senior from Reno, NV, Ted Jones majors in youth ministry under Dr. Rob Hildebrand. Ted learned of Multnomah through Reno’s Meadows Bible Institute. “My passion is youth ministry,” exclaims Ted, “and Multnomah’s YM program is tops.” But it’s the Multnomah community that Ted will never forget. “Relationships with students and faculty have impacted and changed me the most,” he says.
  • Heather Peacock transferred from a California Bible college. A second semester freshman, she is one of our first students to enroll in the new teacher education program. She was aware of Multnomah, drawn to the college because of its accreditation, but it was the new teacher education program that accelerated her decision. “I so appreciate Dr. Debi Miller,” says Heather. “She is a wonderful teacher and mentor, as well as a great program advisor for my interest in public school teaching.”
  • New to the seminary is Vitaliy Khashchuk, who begins the Friday-only Grad program this semester. Originally from the Ukraine, Vitaliy moved to Multnomah from Los Angeles with his wife Sharon and twenty month-old son David to study the Scriptures and prepare for ministry. “At first I didn’t think the timing was right,” reflects Vitaliy, “but encouragement from alumnus Andrew Romanov and from his pastor reinforced his sense that God was leading him to Multnomah right away. “I’m really looking forward to knowing the Bible better,” he says, “and allowing God to prepare me for an expanded ministry.”
  • Laura May is a pharmacist who commutes weekly from Olympia, WA for the Friday-only program. “I’ve known about Multnomah for years,” she explains, “but when Prof. Carley Wecks spoke at a church conference three years ago, I began thinking about the Grad program.” With a growing hunger to get deeper into the Word, she decided to look into the Multnomah’s Friday-only program more seriously. “The biblical emphasis at Multnomah was even better than I expected,” she says,” because the Word of God is central in all the classes, not just the Bible ones.” That, coupled with the personal encouragement of professors and the regular classroom prayer, has enriched Laura’s academic experience.

Community. Ministry preparation. Relationships. Caring professors. A deep commitment to the Word of God. These are some of the spiritual “tiles” of our college and seminary mosaic. By God’s grace, our students are experiencing life change. I believe God will use them to change the world.

Praying for life change in myself,

Daniel R. Lockwood, Ph.D.


A Christmas Message

Comments Off Written on December 24th, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, General, Missions, Pray For MU, Seminary, Students

Christmas is a time for giving. It is also a season for reflecting on the gracious generosity God displayed in sending the gift of Jesus to a darkened world.


One Christmas became memorable for me precisely because of a stranger’s simple, generous invitation.

In December of 1977, my wife Jani and I were living in Dallas, Texas, where I was in the middle of doctoral studies. Since Jani’s brother Albert was studying at the University of Guadalajara, we decided as a family to rendezvous in Mexico to celebrate Christmas south of the border. So, as soon as my last blue book exam was submitted, Mom and Dad Iguchi joined us in Dallas. Together we flew to Mexico City for a few days of sightseeing before winging to Guadalajara to spend Christmas with Albert.

The sights of Mexico City were intriguing. We climbed the Aztec Teotihuacan Pyramids and watched a bullfight. Ole! Then we headed to Guadalajara, one of Portland’s sister cities. Because Albert was involved deeply with a Mennonite church in the city, we were invited by “Heddy,” a Canadian missionary, to stay at her apartment over Christmas. She was planning on being out of town and graciously made her home available to us.

An Unusual Invitation

We had an incredible time celebrating Christmas together, but what I remember most is the serenity and graciousness of many people, from our host herself to a man joyfully shining shoes on Christmas day in the city’s piazza. But most memorable was an unusual invitation. We drove Heddy around the city as she completed errands before her departure. Stopping at her bank, she introduced us to the bank manager. This man, who had never laid eyes on us before, greeted us and immediately invited us to his home. “No one should be alone at Christmas,” he said simply.

Though we declined because we had other plans, the sincerity of his generous offer struck me in a way I’ll never forget. I could not help but think of the gift of God who graciously sent His Son to earth on that first Christmas centuries ago, making it possible that our joy might be full. I was reminded that Christ came to all people, regardless of class, socio-economic status, education, vocation, nationality, ethnicity, or gender. I was convicted that I needed to show greater generosity to others, not just at Christmas but all year round, as an expression of my gratitude for God’s gracious gift.

God's Grace and Multnomah Students

God continues to be gracious to our students at Multnomah, too. One of my Grad students, Annet Kyomugisha, tells a remarkable story of how the generosity of God’s people made it possible for her to study at Multnomah. She, her husband Fred, and their daughter Deborah travelled to Portland from Rwanda in the fall of 2008. Fred, one of my theology students last year, is now in his second year at Multnomah pursuing his MAPS.

Annet desperately wanted to enroll in seminary, too. She realized how important her education would be for their work in Rwanda. From a human standpoint, the financial need seemed impossibly great. Yet she had enough faith to apply to the seminary, though without hope that funds would be available. When her application was accepted last summer, she put it on the shelf and continued to pray. Then, one day just before school began, something amazing happened.

“That morning, I received a $1,000 check in the mail from a friend in Portland,” she said. That same afternoon, a friend from Washington, D.C., and then a friend from Texas called, inquiring about their financial needs. Fred explained their desire for Annet to enroll in seminary. One person pledged $5,000 for her education, and the other promised $4,000.

“I did not send out letters requesting financial aid,” Annet explained, “so it is still not clear to me why these generous people decided to respond the way they did.”

But respond they did. Eventually, $16,000 was given from these three people, and she was able to begin classes this fall.

Two things struck me about Annet’s story. One was her remarkable faith. She applied to Multnomah when she had no earthly reason to believe it was possible. Yet she believes in a God of the impossible. Had she not applied, her matriculation might have been delayed a full semester. Annet’s experience seems to say, “Step out in faith and trust God to provide the way.”

Joy of Generosity

The other important lesson is that God’s provision and timing is always perfect. He provided what she needed just at the right time. More than that, he involved other believers in the process, allowing them the joy of generosity. Because of their gifts, a beautiful couple poised to make a strategic impact on the spiritual and theological landscape of Rwanda, may return to their native country equipped for the task God has for them.

Transformed by the generous Gift of God,

Daniel R. Lockwood

A Note Of Thanksgiving From The President

Comments Off Written on November 26th, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Faculty, General, Pray For MU

(Note: This is the first one in a series of posts where we will publish a near-monthly letter from the Dr. Lockwood that usually goes out to donors and supporters of Multnomah's ministry.)

Of Psalm 100 & Thanksgiving

I am not sure why I often think of Psalm 100 when Thanksgiving rolls around.  Probably, it’s because I memorized it as a child and it still sticks.  After all, who can ever forget that we are to “make a joyful noise!”

Apparently, I’m not alone.  Christians over the centuries have called this psalm, “The Old One Hundred.”  This November, in church services across the land and in hundreds of thousands of Christian homes, this psalm will be recited, read, prayed, or sung before the ritual of devouring the turkey begins.

What delights me most is that this venerable poem (for Hebrew poetry it is) is such good theology.  Its five short verses are anchored by two great truths about God.  Let’s explore them together, with illustrations from God’s work in, through, and with the people of Multnomah.

The Lord is God

The first great truth affirms the greatness of God (v. 3).  The Lord—Yahweh—is God, indeed!  And fittingly, this portion of the psalm is a call to exuberant worship.  Shout!  Rejoice!  Sing!  The psalmist summons us to uninhibited praise because that truly is the only acceptable response when we stand in the presence of the Lord our God.

Our students take this call to uninhibited, joyful worship literally.  This fall, our college chapel program moved onto campus, meeting often in the Joseph C. Aldrich student cafeteria.  It’s not as convenient as Central Bible’s auditorium: extra sound, lighting, staging, and a digital projector and screen had to be added.  A crew of student volunteers moves the dining room tables out of the way and arranges the 400 chairs in rows before chapel begins.  The space itself is barely large enough for our student body as they pack into the chairs or stand shoulder to shoulder in the back.

But they love it!  They define “close communion” creatively.  Veteran chapel-goers like me can sense renewed energy and excitement among the students for prayer, singing, and responding to the Word of God.

The psalmist, after exclaiming that the Lord is the sovereign God, then reminds us of who we are.  Notice the two descriptions (v. 3): we are His creatures (the Lord made us) and we are His sheep (the Lord shepherds us).  Just think of it!  Our great God is our Sovereign and our Shepherd.  We, on the other hand, are His fragile vessels and His vulnerable lambs.  No wonder we are called to worship this sovereign Shepherd.  All we are, all we have, and all we can become belong to Him.

As a campus community, we have witnessed—and endured—great sorrow this year.  Dr. Joe, Multnomah’s beloved third president, passed away last February from a debilitating fifteen years with Parkinson’s.  In May, Laura Silva and her brother-in-law alumnus Tony Silva were tragically taken in a climbing accident.  This September, Gordon Peterson, a well-regarded high school teacher in Vancouver and a 1984 alumnus, was struck and killed while riding his bicycle.  His daughter, Julia, a freshman at Multnomah this fall, continues to grieve with her family.

We cannot explain these events, nor are we called to do so.  Rather, we find comfort in a sovereign Shepherd who loves His sheep. 

The Lord is Good

The second great truth underscores the goodness of God (v. 5).  The Lord our God is a good God, the palmist explains.  And our appropriate response to this is thanksgiving—thanks laced with the praise that a supplicant would bear to a majestic ruler as he passes through the palace gates and enters the royal court.  How fitting!  We worship God because He is great.  We thank Him because He is good.  And, God’s goodness, the psalmist tells us, is expressed in two magnificent ways: His enduring love and His everlasting faithfulness.

At Multnomah we have witnessed God’s enduring love time after time.  We see it in the hundreds of new and returning students He entrusts us with each semester.  Each one is a walking miracle of God’s love and grace.  We observe it in the ways transformation takes place in those lives, even within the span of a semester.  We catch in the students that go out from here into all kinds of effective service—from vocational to marketplace ministries.

We also experience His everlasting faithfulness.  I don’t need to remind you that we are in a difficult economic climate.  Our enrollment has suffered in our traditional programs this fall, in large part because many students cannot afford to attend Multnomah right now.  All of us on faculty and staff are cutting necessary expenses to keep ahead of the financial curve.

Yet the Lord remains faithful, especially to some of our faithful donors have had to reduce their support as they deal with depleted retirement savings or loss of jobs.  I am so grateful at this special time of year for your faithfulness in supporting this work.  You indeed reflect God’s faithfulness to us!

Making a joyful noise to the Lord,

Daniel R. Lockwood