Press Releases

Global ministry trends and issues, part four: Indigenous ministries and partnerships

No Comments » Written on August 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Missions, Press Releases

This is the fourth post in a series of articles on global ministry trends and issues presented by Dr. Greg Burch, Director of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program and Chair of the Global Studies Department. You can read more articles from Dr. Burch on his personal site, The Burch Blog.

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Here I am at a Global Mission Gathering.

This week I’m writing from Seoul, South Korea, where I’m participating in an international conference that has pulled together mission scholars from all over the world. With every region of the world and dozens of countries represented here, one gets the sense that the mission of God is being fulfilled. South Korea in particular is a good place to write about indigenous ministries and partnerships. There are more than 20,000 Korean missionaries serving around the world today. The percentage of Christians (representing both Catholic and Protestant churches) in South Korea is at about 32% with over 7,600 churches in the capital city (Seoul) alone.

Globally we note a proliferation of indigenous churches, ministries and global partnerships. This is often referred to as the growth of the majority world Church (see J.D. Payne chapter 3). As noted by African scholar, John Mbiti, today the Church’s center of power does not remain in places like New York, but rather in cities like Manila, Philippines. More and more people around the world are engaging in global mission. It is estimated that nearly 35,000 American Hispanic churches are increasingly becoming involved in global missions. The following chart highlights just a sample of the growth of international missionary movements:

Country Missionaries
India 82,950
China, PRC 20,000
Nigeria 6,644
Philippines 4,500
Indonesia 3,000
Ghana 2,000
Ukraine 1,599

These statistics reflect those missionaries serving more than two years and represent Protestant, Independent and Anglican missionaries. They also do not reflect the numbers of those who might consider themselves missionaries, but are living internationally due to diaspora.

This proliferation of global involvement has changed the very nature of how we understand missions today. Bill Dyrness recently noted, “Missions is now mutual exchange among the multiple centers of influence and learning and resources traveling all directions…” (Borthwick 39). No longer can we refer to the United States as a missionary ‘sending’ country. The same can be said for many countries that have traditionally been ‘receiving’ countries of missionary involvement. Significant mission organizations that were once based in these receiving nations are now focused on sending out missionary candidates.

With these changes within global mission activities must also come a new order for partnerships. North American Christians and agencies must now consider sharing decision-making opportunities with those they traditionally considered ‘receiving’ nations. Pakistani missiologist, Michael Nazir-Ali, says “partnership in mission must mean partnership in the whole of mission. Churches in the global south need to be involved with the North in the identification and articulation of mission issues as much as in addressing them” (211).

Appropriate and contextual training will be needed for those going out to serve within multi-ethnic and international teams. Students of mission will need to understand the reality of multi-ethnic teams and global partnerships if they are to succeed. The training must include cultural sensitivity and competency in foreign languages (sometimes multiple languages). Preparing students for such action will need to be incorporated into new training courses in the U.S. and abroad.

Here at Multnomah, we continue to develop courses that will prepare students to engage with sensitivity with those from distinct cultures. This is needed in business, education, counseling, pastoral ministries and other degree paths, just as much as it is needed in Global Studies in today’s world.

 

Works Cited

Borthwick, Paul. Western Christians in Global Mission. Downers Grove, IL: IVP, 2012.

Mandryk, Jason. Operation World. Colorado Springs, CO: Biblica, 2010.

Nazir-Ali, Michael. From Everywhere to Everywhere: A World View of Christian Mission. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock. 2009.

Payne, J.D. Pressure Points: Twelve Global Issues Shaping the Face of the Church. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson 2013.

Global ministry trends and issues, part three: Discerning globalization

No Comments » Written on August 8th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Press Releases

This is the third post in a series of articles on global ministry trends and issues presented by Dr. Greg Burch, Director of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program and Chair of the Global Studies Department. You can read more articles from Dr. Burch on his personal site, The Burch Blog.

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Globalization is an important issue for those concerned with global mission engagement. We are now far more connected globally than ever before, yet with globalization comes benefits and risks, and as noted below, opportunities for global ministry.

Defining globalization is no easy task. One author defines globalization as a slow process that began in the 15th and 16th centuries in northwest Europe. As the network of material exchange grew, so grew the world capital market. Ankie Hoogvelt notes, “This network developed over time into a world market for goods and services, or an international division of labour” (14).

As noted below, this economic reality in the twenty-first century has benefits and risks for the global poor. Merilee Grindle (2000) comments on the lack of equality in the distribution of globalized expansion of “goods, services, capital, and information that characterizes this process of change” (179). And we know from the teachings of Scripture, when the poor hurt, the Church is to hurt with them. This is most evident in the teachings and practices of Christ. Matthew 25:31-46 is one of the clearest examples of Christ’s calling for solidarity with the poor and those exploited. The Old Testament is filled with references for God’s heart for the poor. This often times is referred to as biblical justice. Because God acts justly toward the rich and the poor, we too are to act rightly and seek His justice for them. Proverbs 29:7 says, “The righteous care about justice for the poor, but the wicked have no such concern.” Scripture places emphasis on care for the poor given their place of helplessness in the midst of difficult situations that impact their lives. Noteworthy are laws concerning widows, orphans and foreigners among the Israelites. See Ex. 22:21-24; 23:9; Lev. 19:33; Duet 27:19. Such laws were presented to the Israelites to help guide justice among those who were living in precarious situations in society.

Also important to point out is the negative impact globalization is having on the planet. “Destruction of habitats and environmental pollution have been the fallout from some companies seeking to take advantage of business in a world that is more “liquid” and “light” (Payne 80). The consequences of these ailments will undoubtedly continue to demand that those who serve Christ in international contexts understand the complexity of our ecological systems and the negative impacts that environmental decay has on the very people they are called to serve. Environmentally sensitive missionaries will seek to mitigate harm caused by globalization’s impact on the environment.

As noted above, globalization must be understood economically, but we must also acknowledge the socio-cultural effects that our globalized world is having on cultures and societies. Globalization can also be understood as a societal process that impacts political, cultural and social arrangements in our world today. Take travel for example. As migration and travel increases, so does the sharing of ideas and culture. This is a distinctive of globalization in our world today and will continue to effect relationships into the future. Societal changes are taking place much faster today due to globalization.

Tom Steffen and Lois McKinney Douglas in Encountering Missionary Life and Work (where many of these trends are also discussed) make mention of the important shift in global theology and identify the need to become a learner of these changes within theological studies. This is what I would refer to as global theologizing. With this new opportunity for collaboration on globalized theology, come some challenges as well. There will be disagreements on contextual perspectives on theology, but with these differences there should be a pursuit of dignity and respect between believers.

Stephen and Douglas recommend becoming a “learner-leader” as we see globalization both critiqued and embraced (344). This is true for a globalization of theology and even mission theory. As missionally driven followers of Christ, we desire to see the effects of globalization translate into societal processes that positively impact all of God’s creation. This will sometimes lead us to advocate for policies and laws that seek to equally distribute the benefits of this phenomenon.

Mission endeavors will continue to be impacted by this global occurrence. One of the benefits, as acknowledged by J.D. Payne is the impact quick travel now has on those who work internationally. “Now we have the blessings of instant verbal, textual and visual communications with loved ones back home. Return trips are quick and practical” (80-81). For the most part, gone are the days of the missionary packing their worldly resources into their coffin as they wave goodbye to friends and family, never to hear from them again. While this is true, there are additional risks as well. The time one has to adjust and deal with culture shock must be mitigated. Member care is now a must for any organization that sponsors international mission trips or career placement. I often tell our students, if the organization does not have good member care, consider looking elsewhere.

Globalization and its results effect ministry in many ways. For some it creates an urgent need to care for those negatively impacted; for others, it creates some remarkable benefits in both access to goods and services. The Church must be vigilant to the needs of those negatively impacted, while leveraging the opportunities to impact our world for Christ.

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Works Cited

Hoogvelt, Ankie. Globalization and the Postcolonial World. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press 2001. Print.

Grindle, Merilee S. “Ready or Not: The Developing World and Globalization." In Governance in a Globalizing World, edited by Joseph S Nye and John D. Donahue. Washington D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2000. Print.

Payne, J.D. Pressure Points: Twelve Global Issues Shaping the Face of the Church. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson 2013. Print.

Steffen, Tom and Lois McKinney Douglas. Encountering Missionary Life and Work:     Preparing for Intercultural Ministry. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic. 2008. Print.

Chapel strengthens community, offers global perspective

Comments Off on Chapel strengthens community, offers global perspective Written on March 23rd, 2016 by
Categories: Press Releases

Chapel

A time to gather

If you walk into the JCA cafeteria at 10 in the morning, chances are you’ll see hands lifted in worship. Or a nonprofit leader detailing ways to fight prostitution in Thailand. Or an alum describing sustainable business practices. Or maybe even a game of bubble soccer led by some youth ministry majors.

Three times a week, Multnomah students gather in chapel to pursue God as a group. That might mean listening to a local pastor, viewing student art projects or keeping updated on social justice issues.

“Chapel is valuable because everyone (is here) to experience something together,” says Stan Campbell, who runs the university chapel program. “It’s the only time that happens.”

English major Moriah Paterson agrees. “Chapel is crucial to keeping MU knit together,” she says. It’s where community becomes more than a catchphrase.

Glorifying God

Worship chapels are by far the most popular among MU students. Music major Kara Davis is in her second year of leading worship at MU, and she greatly appreciates the variety of denominations and cultures represented by her fellow students.

“No matter what background you’re from, you can worship,” she says. “Worshiping together brings us closer to Christ and closer as a community.”

When there aren’t worship chapels, the Chapel Committee — a group composed of staff, students and faculty — makes sure there’s a plethora of pastors, globe-trekkers, alumni, MU professors, writers, leaders and laymen booked to spotlight what God is doing in Portland and around the world.

“We want to focus on strengthening ties with the local church community,” says Campbell. “But we also want students to be more globally aware. It’s about glorifying God.”

“Chapel is like a traffic intersection,” says history major Johanna Ohmes. “There are all different types of speakers, testimonies and careers options presented.”

‘A heart seeking to engage’

Chapel is a core element of a Multnomah education. It’s a special time set aside to seek Christ as community, but it also emphasizes individual spiritual growth.

“Chapel is central to who (MU) is,” says global studies major Rachel Pinon. “It makes Scripture come alive in the community before you apply it in your life.”

“Come to chapel with expectation,” says Campbell. “It’s an opportunity to invest your time and see what God does.”

Psychology major Bonnie Lundgren concurs: “If you come with a heart seeking to engage, you will get something out of it.”

Alumna, naturopathic doctor Mia Potter infuses faith with career

Comments Off on Alumna, naturopathic doctor Mia Potter infuses faith with career Written on July 17th, 2015 by
Categories: Alumni, Press Releases, Students

Mia Potter isn’t your typical doctor. She doesn’t see dozens of patients each day. She isn’t fixated on conventional medicine. And she doesn’t focus on your symptoms.

Potter is a naturopathic doctor (N.D.). She completed a naturopathic medical doctoral program*, passed the national and state board exams for licensure, and works as a primary care physician at Selah Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon.

Her initial appointments with patients last between 60 and 90 minutes; follow-up visits are 30-45. An average appointment with a conventional doctor is 15 minutes.

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“I have space with people to hear their stories,” she says. “It’s so rewarding when someone feels heard and when a treatment plan works.”

Potter’s treatment plans are as varied as the patients she sees; she doesn’t settle for a one-size-fits-all approach. “If three different people come to me with headaches, they might need three different treatments,” she says.

It takes time and patience to find and remove the root cause of an illness, and Potter is committed to finding the truth — not merely suppressing symptoms. “A headache might be caused by hormones, an allergy, lifestyle, diet, ergonomics or something else,” she says. “I try to be a detective with my patients.”

‘We want to be fixed quickly’

Many of the people Potter helps are disappointed with conventional medicine and desperate for lasting relief. But the naturopathic approach to health is not necessarily the fastest.

“We want to be fixed quickly, but it took many years for most of us to create the patterns that impact our health,” she says. “It takes years, if not a lifetime, to relearn how to live and function differently.”

Years of retraining may seem daunting, but Potter knows the rewards are worth the struggle. “It’s very much like our walk with the Lord,” she says. “As we change and grow, it can be new and awkward and confusing, but God has created things to support us. My hope is that I can journey with people while encouraging, empowering and equipping them to live healthier lives.”

‘A transformative year’

Potter’s own journey to naturopathic medicine began years before she knew what a naturopathic doctor was. She earned a bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Science from UC Berkeley before becoming a nutritionist. Through a conference she met Mission: Moving Mountains, a holistic community development agency serving countries around the world.

Potter decided to join their ministry in Senegal, Africa, but she had to prep first: One of the requirements was a strong biblical foundation. That’s how she found herself enrolled in the graduate certificate program at Multnomah.

The 12-month course was a pivotal point in her life. “It was a transformative year,” she says. “I grew up in church and was taught a doctrine, but at Multnomah there were so many different perspectives. I was in awe. The box I had God in got exploded.”

Living on campus only enhanced her experience. “My roommates became my closest friends — we studied, prayed, cried and had a lot of fun together,” she says. “It was a really special, supportive community. I still have friends from then.”

‘A better resource’

Once Potter graduated she joined Mission: Moving Mountains in Africa, where she served on a team as a nutritionist. After six months, she returned to Oregon and married a young man she’d met at Multnomah.

The next season of Potter’s life was filled with career development as she conducted exercise and diet research at the Portland VA Hospital and Oregon Health and Science University. She worked part-time as a nutritionist in between her research jobs.

“My job made me discover that I wanted to be a better resource for my patients,” she says. That’s when her husband stepped in. “He told me I should be a naturopathic doctor. I said, ‘What the heck is that?’ But once I looked into it, I realized it fit perfectly into the path the last decade of my life had taken.”

‘The ultimate holistic healer’

That path has led her right to Selah Natural Medicine, where she practices as a primary care physician. She also teaches classes on nutrition and eating disorders to graduate students at the Helfgott Research Institute.

The biblical wisdom she cultivated at Multnomah continues to inspire Potter and her career. “My faith influences every aspect of my work,” she says. “So much of naturopathy is steeped in the Scriptures. Think about the manna for the Israelites and the living water for the woman at the well. God provides for people in the ways they need; he goes to the root cause of their issues. He is the ultimate holistic healer.”

Potter says MU fostered an openness to talk with the Lord that still influences her prayers today. “There are so many things I took from Multnomah,” she says. “I learned to walk with open hands. I pray for my patients. I trust that God will bring them to me if they’re supposed to cross my path.”

And when they do, Potter is ready to hear their stories — and help change their lives.

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*Accredited, naturopathic medical doctoral programs are comprised of the hard sciences, clinical and lab diagnosis, pharmacology, treatment modalities such as botanical medicine, homeopathy, nutrition, and physical medicine, as well as clinic internships. Learn more about naturopathic medicine.

Psychology graduate Erik Mendoza takes his skills to Adidas

Comments Off on Psychology graduate Erik Mendoza takes his skills to Adidas Written on June 25th, 2015 by
Categories: Alumni, Athletics, Press Releases, Students

A Multnomah degree won’t just qualify you for a rewarding career and equip you for grad school — it will set you apart as a redeeming force in the workplace. Erik Mendoza’s experience at MU provided a solid foundation for his future, and the principles he took from the classroom — and the basketball court — continue to inspire him.

The psychology major thrived while playing for the Lions. He served three years as team captain and was awarded the Pete Maravich Memorial Award, an annual honor given to the nation’s most outstanding NCCAA Division II athlete. He also volunteered with his teammates at a local children’s hospital and even traveled with them on mission trips to the Czech Republic and Taiwan.

“Those experiences make the basketball team more than a basketball team,” Mendoza says. “If you stick around, you’ll come out a better and stronger person.”

Upon graduating, Mendoza was hired by one of the world’s top sports brands: Adidas. Now he’s a retail marketing specialist for the company’s basketball, baseball and football divisions.

“My psychology degree taught me so much about how people work, and translating that into marketing hasn’t been hard,” he says. “I love my job. Multnomah challenged me academically and gave me the ability to work and perform at a high level. At the same time, it instilled in me a genuine love for people.”

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Elementary education graduate Kylie Cole opens private preschool

Comments Off on Elementary education graduate Kylie Cole opens private preschool Written on June 2nd, 2015 by
Categories: Alumni, Press Releases, Students

Kylie Cole opened her own preschool just one year after graduation. “Multnomah gave me the tools for my toolbox that I needed,” says the elementary education major. “My education equipped me mentally, emotionally and spiritually for this.” Read the full story.

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Four seminary students selected for two-week internship in Oxford

If studying ancient manuscripts is a dream come true, then studying ancient manuscripts at one of the world’s best universities must be paradise.

Four seminary students from MU have been selected to attend the Logos Conference, a two-week internship at Oxford sponsored by the Green Scholars Initiative (GSI). Only students working on GSI projects were invited to apply for the summer conference, where world-renowned academic experts will teach them history, theology and textual studies.

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Haley Kirkpatrick (pictured) is studying in Oxford with classmates Becca McMartin, Daniel Somboonsiri and David Tucker.

Students from more than 60 schools across North America applied, but only 30 people were selected. Five additional students who participated in the 2014 internship were chosen to attend as second-year fellows. David Tucker and Becca McMartin will be attending the conference for the first time. Haley Kirkpatrick and Daniel Somboonsiri will be joining as second-year fellows.

Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz told his Hebrew students about the opportunity this winter and encouraged them to apply. McMartin, Kirkpatrick and Somboonsiri have assisted Kutz with two GSI projects, and Tucker has helped with one. Both projects focused on analyzing a never-before-seen Dead Sea Scroll fragment loaned to them from the Green Collection.

“These four are some of our best students, and I am delighted they have been selected,” says Kutz. “The invitation for them to participate speaks very highly of their skills and the quality of our program.”

McMartin says she waited on pins and needles to find out if she was chosen for the trip. When she heard the good news, she called Kirkpatrick, who had just received confirmation of her own acceptance. They screamed together in glee over the phone.

“This is almost unbelievable,” says McMartin. “Studying a Dead Sea Scroll fragment is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. And everything we do in Oxford will be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity too! It’s humbling, and it’s an honor.”

Kutz, who was invited to lead three sessions of a Logos Hebrew language seminar, will join his students in Oxford for five days. 

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Daniel Somboonsiri (pictured) and Haley Kirkpatrick will attend the Logos Conference as second-year fellows.

“I am excited for them to have the opportunity to learn from other leading scholars in the field of textual research,” he says. “I am also glad they get to rub shoulders with other junior scholars from around the world who will become their peers as they continue in their studies and careers.”

As second-year fellows, Kirkpatrick and Somboonsiri will give presentations on the two GSI projects they have tackled. They’ll discuss the particular fragments they studied, how they analyzed them, processes in research they took and more. In addition to presenting their findings, fellows will also lead small group discussions. “Our schedule in Oxford is packed!” says Kirkpatrick. “Group discussions are a way for us to process the experience as it’s happening.”

Although the internship is a flurry of chapels, lectures, tours, discussions and tea times, Kirkpatrick hopes McMartin and Tucker can slow down to soak it all in. “My hope is that their experience in Oxford affirms for them how well God knows them and what he’s called them to do,” she says.

McMartin says they wouldn’t be going to Oxford if it weren’t for their teachers. “Our professors have accepted a huge responsibility by taking on GSI projects so that we could have this opportunity,” she says. “I’m so thankful for their investment in us.”

Kirkpatrick agrees. “I appreciate their emphasis on teamwork, and I appreciate recognizing and encouraging strengths in your teammates,” she says. “Our professors have a keen understanding of the language complimented by curiosity. They invite their students into the process. I still think we have the best Hebrew program in the country.”

Learn more about MU's Hebrew program.

‘Our outreach is extensive’: Students volunteer down the street, across the world

Collectively, Multnomah students provide more than 38,000 hours to communities each year — and their contributions span the globe.

They serve as role models for at-risk teens in Portland. They partner with nonprofit agencies in the greater community. And this Friday, the men’s basketball team is heading to Taiwan for a trip filled with service projects, community outreach and basketball games.

The Lions will compete in nine games, including Lovelife, a high-profile annual event that raises awareness and money for children with cancer. Teammates will present the Good News during each half-time.

“This trip is important because it’s an exceptional opportunity to share the gospel,” says sophomore business major Tanner Schula. “God has blessed us with the platform of basketball for ministry. Through basketball, we can first connect with the Taiwanese on a personal basis — and then share Christ.”

During the nine-day trip, the Lions will visit several schools, churches and an assisted living facility.

“It’s exciting that a small Christian school can have such a large capacity for ministry,” says Schula, “This trip displays Multnomah’s expansive reach.”

‘What Multnomah is all about’

Head Basketball Coach Curt Bickley puts a heavy emphasis on outreach and community service; he’s led his teams on mission trips to the Czech Republic and Taiwan for the past seven years. This is the fifth time the Lions are traveling to Taiwan.

“We’re looking forward to seeing old friends, spreading the Gospel, and playing basketball in a great place,” says Bickley. “It’s very exciting that our university has such an emphasis on mission work and that we get to take part in such a great trip.”

The athletes don’t stop serving when they’re back in the States. For the past eight years, the Lions have hosted a free basketball clinic for children at a Native American reservation in Washington. The clinic gives the team an opportunity to impart their skills — and share their faith. “Kids have gotten saved at these events,” says Bickley.

The Lions also volunteer at Providence Children’s Hospital, just down the street from campus. The athletes connect with boy and girls, some of them terminally ill, for a few hours each week. They play games, read, color or just talk.

“Our outreach is extensive,”says Bickley. “This team reflects what Multnomah is all about.”

Communicating values through action

The trip to Taiwan closely follows another service event Multnomah has observed for decades — Day of Outreach. Once every spring and fall, students volunteer at several locations in the Portland community in need of their time and energy. A volunteer site can be anywhere: a nonprofit organization, a school, a community center. Even a neighbor’s home. MU cancels classes for the day so students can devote their whole morning to service.

Senior psychology major Brenna Coy has been attending Day of Outreach since she transferred to MU as a sophomore. “Volunteering encourages me and other students to reach out to our neighborhood,” she says. “It builds bridges in the community.”

Theology and philosophy professor Dr. Mike Gurney agrees. He appreciates the opportunity to impact local organizations while interacting with students outside the classroom. Multnomah requires half of its professors to participate in each Day of Outreach event.

“As Christians, it’s not just about what we say; it’s also about what we do,” he says. “We want to communicate our values through action.”

One fall, Gurney and Coy joined a group of student volunteers at Portland Metro Arts (PMA), a nonprofit community arts organization in Southeast Portland. For several hours they dusted, wiped, polished and swept.

Nancy Yeamans, PMA’s executive director, supervised as students bustled around her. A vacuum hummed in the background, and the smell of Windex hung in the air.

“I know you think that cleaning is probably not a big deal,” she said. “But to us it’s a huge deal because we rely a lot on volunteers. It’s meaningful beyond what you can imagine.”

‘We need to love people’

Besides international trips and Day of Outreach, students participate year-round in Service Learning, a campus-based program that connects them with local nonprofits. Students volunteer weekly at more than 70 organizations across the Portland metro area. They also gain priceless wisdom from field specialists who double as mentors.

“We’re committed to helping students integrate what they’re learning in the classroom with real life,” says Service Learning Director Dr. Roger Trautmann. “Whatever service God puts on their hearts is a possibility. From skateboarding to helping the homeless, from children’s ministry to working with seniors, we can connect them with more than 1,500 churches, ministries and service organizations.”

Sophomore Bible and theology major Katie Mansanti says Service Learning connected her to Adorned in Grace Design Studio, an outreach to at-risk teen girls in Northeast Portland. People donate all kinds of fabrics to the nonprofit, where volunteers like Mansanti teach the girls how to sew. The studio aims to prevent sex trafficking by empowering young women to become advocates on behalf of their sisters and friends.

Volunteers provide snacks, help with homework, offer workshops, run a mentorship program and lead a Bible study. “This is a safe place for them to hang out after school and have someone to talk to,” Mansanti says.

Mansanti’s knack for sewing and heart for teens was a perfect fit for the studio. “It’s nice to take something that’s second nature to me and share it with these girls,” she says. “We all need someone to nudge us along and tell us we’re doing a good job.”

Volunteering may be a time commitment for students, but Mansanti doesn’t see it as a burden. “Service Learning allows you to give back,” she says. “Helping people is important to God. We need to love people and be Jesus to them.”

Teachers, scholars and leaders: Faculty add to a rich legacy of scholarship

Comments Off on Teachers, scholars and leaders: Faculty add to a rich legacy of scholarship Written on April 27th, 2015 by
Categories: Books, Faculty, Press Releases, Theology

A lot of great things are happening at Multnomah – new majors, new online degrees, new athletic programs – but one thing hasn’t changed: our commitment to providing an exceptional academic experience firmly rooted in God’s Word.

josberger_featureimageOur professors express this commitment by cultivating biblical wisdom in our students and publishing works that add depth and meaning to their respective fields. They’re experts in biblical exegesis, language and theological research – and they’re keenly aware of the complexities of modern society.

“Our faculty serve as thought leaders in their particular academic areas,” says Dr. Craig Williford, Multnomah’s president. “Their research, publications, speaking and teaching are all anchored in the authoritative Word of God.”

Multnomah’s rich legacy of scholarship continues to this day. Current Multnomah faculty members have authored more than 20 books covering a wide array of topics. They include Al Baylis, Derek Chinn, Brad Harper, Rebekah Josberger, Rex Koivisto, Rick McKinley, Paul Louis Metzger, Daniel Scalberg, Wayne Strickland and John Terveen.

“They know that God’s truth provides the proper foundation for all our academic explorations,” says Williford. “Combining their commitment to the Bible with being on the forefront of research provides the best quality educational experience for our students.”

Visit our faculty page to learn more.

Multnomah University adds track and field to the sports lineup

Comments Off on Multnomah University adds track and field to the sports lineup Written on April 10th, 2015 by
Categories: Press Releases

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Multnomah University Athletic Department is excited to announce the addition of men’s and women’s track and field for the 2015-16 school year.

“We are so thankful for the support and encouragement that we have received from our administration as we continue to grow our athletic offerings here at MU,” Athletic Director Lois Vos said. “Adding track and field is a big step for MU, and we are blessed to have such an experienced and caring leader in Coach David Lee to get things started.”

As coach of both cross country teams, Lee led the Lions to an extremely successful inaugural season. The men’s team qualified for the NCCAA Division II national race, and Nathan Meeker became MU’s first individual national champion. Sindy Larson, meanwhile, also ran in the NCCAA Division II championships, becoming the first female athlete from MU to compete at the national level.

“Coaching at MU is a privilege, and the responsibility of starting programs from the-ground-up is especially joyous,” Coach Lee said. “Getting acquainted with new coaching partners as we share the anticipation of what God has planned for the Lions is a big part of my joy. Everywhere I recruit, the name Multnomah is well received because the school's administration, faculty and staff have held true to the earliest core values of the founders. I hope that our new athletic endeavors meld well with the spiritual heritage that is such a key part of MU and that we'll be recognized  for athletic excellence in the future.”

With the addition of the track and field squads, Multnomah now features 10 teams. Over the past year, MU Athletics has grown by leaps and bounds by adding six programs: men’s soccer, men’s and women’s cross country, women’s basketball, and men’s and women’s golf. The Lions have a distinguished history in men’s basketball and women’s volleyball.

Pending acceptance into the NAIA, all of the teams will compete in the Cascade Collegiate Conference during the 2015-16 season. The NAIA offers 23 different track and field events for student athletes. Madison and Portland Christian high schools have graciously given MU the go-ahead to use their facilities for training in the various track and field disciplines.