Seminary

In Their Own Words

A professor, an alumnus, and a student share about the interconnectedness of the Multnomah family.

Dr. Roger Trautmann, Associate Professor of Pastoral Ministries

On April 21, 2010, Linda Wood, a graduate of Multnomah Biblical Seminary, shared with students in my Orientation to Institutional Ministries class, a chaplaincy track course.  She described her call and preparation for police chaplaincy.  God has given her sensitivity to this ministry through her experiences as a wife and mother of police officers.  In this line of work officers face many challenges, not only in their personal lives but also in their public role.  A chaplain gives assistance in the care of officers and their family as well as service to the public through emergency response, death notifications, domestic issues and the like.  Linda explained the practical training that she receives to support her work as well as the prayer support and personal resources that bless her in this ministry role.  She provided “street” wisdom for the students in my class as well as stories of opportunities she has been given to demonstrate and declare the good news of God’s love and grace because of her front-line ministry. The class was greatly enriched by Linda’s presentation.

Rev. Linda Wood, M.A. Pastoral Studies, ‘00

Greetings fellow Alumni! Recently I received the annual call from a college student requesting a donation to the school. What a special blessing! I always enjoy taking a few minutes to talk to the student, ask how he/she is doing, and answer their questions. Of course, the students always ask how they can pray for me, my family and ministry. This time the student (Katie Wendel) and I made a special connection and we agree that it was definitely a God thing. We found out that we share an interest in horses and since I was going to be at the school to talk to Dr. Trautmann’s class, Katie and I decided to meet. What a joy to spend time with this young woman! When my husband and I found out that she was from out of state we decided to 'adopt' her while she is in school. It hit me that this young woman could not afford to fly home for the holidays except Christmas. We can always add one more to our table to join our family and I would hope if it was my child, someone would do that for them. God blessed Katie and I. We connected almost immediately, and I know she will fit into our family. I would like to encourage others to think about adding this type of blessing to your lives. God bless each of you.

Katie Wendel, Student Phone-A-Thon Caller

Educational Ministries major with Women’s Ministry emphasis
Hometown: Farmington, Utah
Favorite Class: Gender and Ministry with Bonnie Kopp
Plans after Multnomah: Masters in Counseling program

As a student caller at Multnomah, we call Multnomah alumni once a semester to keep them updated on campus life and talk with them about their lives. I called Linda Wood and started talking with her when her husband came home. She asked me to hold on for one moment and proceeded to have a quick conversation with her husband about his physical therapy. I heard Linda ask her husband what the physical therapist said about riding. Being a horse person myself, I asked her what kind of riding she was speaking about. We proceeded to discuss her time at Multnomah and her husband’s love for horses. She offered to have me out to their house to ride after they purchased another horse. She mentioned that she was coming to the seminary to speak in a class and that it would be a great opportunity to meet so I could get to know her and see pictures of her babies (both horses and grandchildren). I feel so privileged to have an opportunity to establish a relationship with such an awesome woman of God. In our short meeting, I got to talk with Linda and discuss where I am going as a student at Multnomah. Linda was so encouraging and I am looking forward to getting to know her better.

Multnomah Is Part Of My Story – Call For Videos!

Comments Off Written on April 30th, 2010 by
Categories: Alumni, Contests, General, Media, Seminary

Attention all Alumni!

The Multnomah family wants to know what you are up to. You can help us share your story by making a video!

3 Easy Steps to Making Your Video

  1. Make Your Video
    • Start with: “Hi, I’m (name) and I graduated in (class year) with a (degree name).”
    • What you are currently doing (life, ministry, career)
    • Multnomah’s ongoing impact in your life
    • End with: “I’m (name) and Multnomah is part of my story."
  2.  Keep It Short
    • Under 2 minutes – or shorter if possible, but still riveting!
  3. Upload!
    • Upload your video to YouTube or another video sharing site and send the link to alumni@multnomah.edu OR send us a DVD.

What Will Happen With It

We will choose a video each month to be our Alumni Spotlight Video. (If your video is chosen, we will send your video’s link to all Multnomah alumni in the Alumni Connection e-newsletter.)

We’ll likely add all of them to our YouTube Channel’s “favorites” section and upload them to the Facebook Fan Page:

Now go… Get rolling! Looking forward to hearing about your adventures! Nobody tells the Multnomah story like our Alumni!

A New Partnership With Georgene Rice

Comments Off Written on April 26th, 2010 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Faculty, General, Media, Seminary

Some of you who listen to The Georgene Rice Show on Portland's KPDQ 93.9 fm radio station already know this - but for the rest of you, we have some really big news!

(See the Podcasted Show announcement below)

The Deal

We've recently signed an agreement to be the primary sponsor of the very well-known Georgene Rice Show.

  • The show will now be broadcast from the "Multnomah Studios at KPDQ"
  • We've partnered up to sponser her podcasts and the call-in phone line
  • There will be a new segment called "Ask the Professor"...(for which they've opened up a competition for Multnomah people to write and produce the segment jingle for it! - email us at procom@multnomah.edu for more details on how you can be famous)
  • Ms. Rice will bring her show to the Multnomah campus (Portland) 3 times/year now
  • There are more items to add to this list, but it's long enough for a blog post!

The Kick-Off

Our President, Dr. Dan Lockwood, went on air live last Monday (4/19) to discuss the new agreement. We've posted the mp3 podcast here for your enjoyment. You'll hear a Multnomah Biblical Seminary radio commercial to start it out and then Dr. Dan comes on at about the 8-minute mark. So simply scroll over to go straight to that if you like. (But the whole show is great! Hello, Georgene!).

Download It

New Wine, New Wineskins’ Spring Conference

Comments Off Written on April 7th, 2010 by
Categories: Faculty, General, Pray For MU, Seminary

(The following is a reprint of our press release - but since space is filling up fast at this event, we thought we should get something up right away!)

Multnomah Biblical Seminary's Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins will hold two seminars to promote unity in the church and outreach to the poor on April 9th and 10th, respectively. Together, these seminars make up the annual Spring conference that New Wine puts on in the community.

People often think caring for the poor in the analogy of giving a poor man fish to eat or teaching him to fish so he can eat forever. Neither approach moves beyond charity, which keeps the poor dependant and demeans their humanity. Instead, Christians must help the poor become entrepreneurs so that they can own the pond together.

An Evening of Inspiration, April 9th

At the introductory seminar, "An Evening of Inspiration: breaking down barriers", Dr. Paul Louis Metzger will discuss how the white church has historically failed to build a relationship with the black church. Together, Dr. Metzger and Dr. John M. Perkins will urge the church to long for unity and will lay the foundation of what "owning the pond together" means.

Owning the Pond Together, April 10th

The second seminar, "Owning the Pond Together: developing communities through entrepreneurship", suggests that community development involves partnering with the poor by thinking creatively and fostering micro-enterprise. The seminar stresses the importance for Christians to move beyond charity and toward cultivating community through effective business practices. In this way can Christians and the poor own the pond together and protect the community from being sold out to the highest bidder.

Perkins, Metzger, and Pastor Eric Bahme will present the importance of partnering with the poor and how to put "owning the pond" principles into practice.

Church Partnership

Following Perkins and Bahme's lead, churches can help form local enterprises that meet local needs and employ indigenous people by partnering with the poor, sharing skills and economic resources and investing capital so the poor will have ownership in the community. Churches can also become partners to foster business ownership among the local people.

Registration

Dr. Dan’s Archives – February 2008

Comments Off Written on February 19th, 2010 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood, General, Programs, Seminary

February 28, 2008. This is a one of the near-monthly letters Dr. Lockwood sends to donors and alumni. See more archives here.
***

Throughout my twenty-eight years at Multnomah, one thing always inspires wonder: that the Word of God—living, active, sharper than a double-edged sword—shapes and sharpens lives in miraculous ways.

Just Ask Bruce

In fact, that is why students enroll here. Just ask Bruce, one of my students in Grad Theology. Retired, an empty nester, and a committed churchman, Bruce, along with his wife Cathy, travelled to Multnomah from Paradise, California. “For years, I’ve known Multnomah’s reputation for teaching the Bible,” Bruce says to me, “and that is why I’m here.”

Bruce is a man of deep, genuine faith who served in his local church in many ways. But, approaching sixty years of age, Bruce discovered something was missing. “In a nutshell,” he admits, “I realized I was biblically illiterate! Sure, I knew enough of the basic doctrines of the Bible to function, but I hungered to know the deeper things of the Word, to wrestle with the great issues of the faith, and to forge my own positions as a result of personal study.”

Into Leadership With No Training

Perhaps what alarmed Bruce most was that he—and scores of others like him—are thrust into positions of leadership without really understanding the fundamental things of God. So, he seized the opportunity to study at Multnomah to fill this spiritual void. “For years, I’ve been told what to believe,” he remembers. “Now, for the first time, I am beginning to discover what I really believe and why.”

By his own admission, Bruce, in the first year of a two-year MAPS program, will never be the same. And it is Multnomah’s unique blend of biblical knowledge applied to the spiritual issues of life that drives this. “Multnomah’s professors push me to ask the tough spiritual questions,” Bruce explains, “like ‘What is the condition of your soul?’ For decades, I have longed for this direction!”

There is nothing more exciting—and rewarding—that this: to see how the Word of God transforms minds and hearts of men and women who will, in turn, change the world.

Rejoicing in life-change,

Daniel R. Lockwood
President

Metzger, Tebow, Pro-life and Superbowl Ads

(Just in case you don't want to read our bloviating below, you can go straight to the source at the New Wine, New Wineskins Blog.)

Christian Faith and "The Big Game"

Just in time for the Superbowl this Sunday, February 7th many media outlets are gearing up by publishing stories ranging from Christian faith in sports to pro-life ads during half-time.

As has become the case in recent years, the Seminary's very own Dr. Paul Louis Metzger was called on to be an expert for the writer of the latest article from the Religion News Service titled: "God and the Gridiron; Some are Crying Foul."

Keeping the Context

As is usually necessary, much of the value in what Dr. Metzger had to say gets stripped out for the sake of the writer's needs within the story. This typically results in only a portion of the quote being used, thereby leaving much to the imagination. In this particular article, Dr. Metzger's quote deals with the issue of a famous Christian football player named Tim Tebow who is featured in an ad (produced by Focus on the Family), espousing the positive results from a pro-life choice made by his mother. This ad will be featured during the Superbowl this year and it has raised the ire of many groups who call it "anti-abortion" and the like.

The Quote

“It could very well be a great message, but is it a good venue?” asked Paul Louis Metzger, who teaches theology and culture at Multnomah Biblical Seminary in Portland, Ore. “Is it helpful to the discussion, or does it up the volume, so to speak, on the culture war rhetoric?”

2_thumbnailWhat Dr. Metzger Wants Us To Know

Check out his post at the New Wine, New Wineskins Blog for further thoughts that we think you'll all like to ponder as we head in to this most holy of sports holidays!

Don’t Miss College Preview!

Comments Off Written on February 3rd, 2010 by
Categories: General, Seminary, Students

That's right! College Preview starts tomorrow (February 4th-5th, 2010) and it looks like there are lot's of previewers coming this year! If you'd like to "try before you buy" the college experience, then this is a great opportunity for you! (or someone you know!)

Check out our fancy new Preview Website
PreviewThumb

By the way, if you are thinking of starting the Bible College this coming Fall 2010, then go hang out with your future classmates at the MU 2010 Facebook Group.

Sustainable Hybrid Education

Comments Off Written on January 29th, 2010 by
Categories: General, Programs, Seminary

Now that we've got your attention with fancy words like "sustainable" and "hybrid", we actually have an interesting article we found some time back that discusses the merits of education that is a blend of online and in-person activities (hence the "hybrid" terminology!).

Sustainable Hybrids - Inside Higher Ed

What does this have to do with Multnomah?

Turns out, little ol' Multnomah is already doing this with what we call "distributed learning" at the Seminary. We call it Multnomah Connect. Not only can you take seminary classes online, but you can take them at our Reno-Tahoe or Anchorage sites as well. Then, when you're ready, you can finish it all up with a visit to the Portland campus. (Somewhere in here, we hear the word "sustainable" too. Yikes!)

Connect_Eml

Other Reading on the Hybrid Education Movement

A Christmas Message

Comments Off Written on December 24th, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, General, Missions, Pray For MU, Seminary, Students

Christmas is a time for giving. It is also a season for reflecting on the gracious generosity God displayed in sending the gift of Jesus to a darkened world.

Generosity

One Christmas became memorable for me precisely because of a stranger’s simple, generous invitation.

In December of 1977, my wife Jani and I were living in Dallas, Texas, where I was in the middle of doctoral studies. Since Jani’s brother Albert was studying at the University of Guadalajara, we decided as a family to rendezvous in Mexico to celebrate Christmas south of the border. So, as soon as my last blue book exam was submitted, Mom and Dad Iguchi joined us in Dallas. Together we flew to Mexico City for a few days of sightseeing before winging to Guadalajara to spend Christmas with Albert.

The sights of Mexico City were intriguing. We climbed the Aztec Teotihuacan Pyramids and watched a bullfight. Ole! Then we headed to Guadalajara, one of Portland’s sister cities. Because Albert was involved deeply with a Mennonite church in the city, we were invited by “Heddy,” a Canadian missionary, to stay at her apartment over Christmas. She was planning on being out of town and graciously made her home available to us.

An Unusual Invitation

We had an incredible time celebrating Christmas together, but what I remember most is the serenity and graciousness of many people, from our host herself to a man joyfully shining shoes on Christmas day in the city’s piazza. But most memorable was an unusual invitation. We drove Heddy around the city as she completed errands before her departure. Stopping at her bank, she introduced us to the bank manager. This man, who had never laid eyes on us before, greeted us and immediately invited us to his home. “No one should be alone at Christmas,” he said simply.

Though we declined because we had other plans, the sincerity of his generous offer struck me in a way I’ll never forget. I could not help but think of the gift of God who graciously sent His Son to earth on that first Christmas centuries ago, making it possible that our joy might be full. I was reminded that Christ came to all people, regardless of class, socio-economic status, education, vocation, nationality, ethnicity, or gender. I was convicted that I needed to show greater generosity to others, not just at Christmas but all year round, as an expression of my gratitude for God’s gracious gift.

God's Grace and Multnomah Students

God continues to be gracious to our students at Multnomah, too. One of my Grad students, Annet Kyomugisha, tells a remarkable story of how the generosity of God’s people made it possible for her to study at Multnomah. She, her husband Fred, and their daughter Deborah travelled to Portland from Rwanda in the fall of 2008. Fred, one of my theology students last year, is now in his second year at Multnomah pursuing his MAPS.

Annet desperately wanted to enroll in seminary, too. She realized how important her education would be for their work in Rwanda. From a human standpoint, the financial need seemed impossibly great. Yet she had enough faith to apply to the seminary, though without hope that funds would be available. When her application was accepted last summer, she put it on the shelf and continued to pray. Then, one day just before school began, something amazing happened.

“That morning, I received a $1,000 check in the mail from a friend in Portland,” she said. That same afternoon, a friend from Washington, D.C., and then a friend from Texas called, inquiring about their financial needs. Fred explained their desire for Annet to enroll in seminary. One person pledged $5,000 for her education, and the other promised $4,000.

“I did not send out letters requesting financial aid,” Annet explained, “so it is still not clear to me why these generous people decided to respond the way they did.”

But respond they did. Eventually, $16,000 was given from these three people, and she was able to begin classes this fall.

Two things struck me about Annet’s story. One was her remarkable faith. She applied to Multnomah when she had no earthly reason to believe it was possible. Yet she believes in a God of the impossible. Had she not applied, her matriculation might have been delayed a full semester. Annet’s experience seems to say, “Step out in faith and trust God to provide the way.”

Joy of Generosity

The other important lesson is that God’s provision and timing is always perfect. He provided what she needed just at the right time. More than that, he involved other believers in the process, allowing them the joy of generosity. Because of their gifts, a beautiful couple poised to make a strategic impact on the spiritual and theological landscape of Rwanda, may return to their native country equipped for the task God has for them.

Transformed by the generous Gift of God,

Daniel R. Lockwood
President

Consumer Christmas, Dr. Metzger, and USA Today

USA Today referenced Dr. Paul Louis Metzger and M.Div alum Tony Kriz in today's opinion blog. The article, written by Tom Krattenmaker, is titled:

"You Can't Buy The Real Gifts Of Christmas"

Consumer Christmas TreeA Metzger Quote

Here's our favorite quote from the story:

"Many thriving prosperity-gospel churches appear to have thoroughly embraced the American ideal of upward mobility and material well-being," Metzger says. "It makes one wonder if these churches' leaders think Jesus was a savvy entrepreneur on the rise, who would have become rich had his career not been cut short."

The Book

Learn more about Consuming Jesus - the book that was the context for Metzger being quoted