Students

Tudor-Stuart England class travels to London

No Comments » Written on April 24th, 2017 by
Categories: Press Releases, Programs, Students

The following post was written by Kari Johnson, a history major at Multnomah University. 

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I recently returned from a short-term study abroad trip to London. I was in a class called Tudor-Stuart England, and we spent this semester studying about the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, which lasted from 1485-1714. We read a book about daily life in Tudor England, a biography of Queen Elizabeth I, and a history of the King James Bible. We studied maps, took tests, and listened to lectures. We watched a great documentary by Simon Schama about the Tudors and Stuarts. Then the day finally came when all that studying came alive for us. As a class, we traveled to England, where we got to actually see the places we had been learning about.  It was amazing! Read the rest of this entry »

Grounds crew keeps campus beautiful, builds community

No Comments » Written on April 20th, 2017 by
Categories: Press Releases, Students

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Blossoming flower trees, green grass and warmer weather are slowly pushing winter away. As the campus begins to welcome spring, one department stands out for their effort in the welcoming — the grounds crew. The grounds crew scored high in last semester’s satisfaction surveys. Their work to keep the campus beautiful has been noticed and appreciated by many.

Bible and theology major Michael Len works as a member of the grounds crew. He has been a member since his first semester at Multnomah two years ago. Some of the work Len could possibly do on any given day includes raking leaves, trimming rose bushes, mowing lawns and doing general cleanup around campus.

However, what makes this job fun to Len is the community around it. There are normally five other grounds crew members working alongside him throughout the year. “The community built when we talk about life while we do something like raking leaves with each other is great,” says Len. The grounds crew, he adds, enjoys playing small pranks on each other. And they all love their boss, Grounds Manager Ron Casey. “He treats us like family and genuinely cares about us,” says Len.

Casey’s favorite part of working as the grounds supervisor is getting to know the students and interacting with them, especially in the summer time. “Over the summer, we have a good routine where we meet in the morning and pray and read Scripture together for 20 minutes,” says Casey. “It is great to see answered prayers come around when we are together.”

With solid leadership and a close-knit community, the grounds crew is able to keep the campus of MU beautiful and welcoming. The individuals who work there find enjoyment in doing some of the “dirty work” on campus as they spend time in their Bibles and with each other. The hard work has not gone unnoticed, and the MU community is quite thankful for the daily tasks completed by the grounds crew.

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This post was written by Marketing Assistant Meghan Ward.

MU hosts first community soccer camp

No Comments » Written on April 10th, 2017 by
Categories: Athletics, Events, Students

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On April 15, many Multnomah students, faculty and staff are coming together to host the first-ever Multnomah University Community Soccer Camp. This camp is primarily being driven by the MU men’s soccer team and the Multnomah University Athletic Department.

Junior global studies major Meghan Ward is assisting with the development of this camp. “The aim of this camp is to give an opportunity for community development and engagement right here on campus, in a way that’s enjoyable for people from all over,” says Ward. “After all, soccer is one of the most popular sports worldwide, and it’s a good platform for developing relationships with a wide range of people.”

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The camp leaders are seeking to gather youth in the age range of 11-18 year old who have diverse backgrounds, diverse experiences, and diverse soccer levels to fulfill this goal. The MU students hosting the camp are reaching out to target groups, fundraising, and receiving some mentoring in an attempt to make the first camp successful.

One of the goals set for this camp is that it will be a lasting and reoccurring event so that genuine relationships can be built and maintained. Junior church leadership major Kevin Cassal is one of the leaders who hopes this camp will be able to continue in future years. “My hope for the camp is that it provides a quality experience for the kids so that we can continue hosting it in the future and watch it grow,” says Cassal.

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The camp is rapidly approaching — it will be hosted on Saturday, April 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With that in mind, the group behind the scenes would love to connect with any possible participants or volunteers for this fun-filled day. All ranges of soccer experience and knowledge are welcome, as the primary goal of this camp is to build relationships while enjoying this beautiful game.

If you are interested in getting involved, please email Meghan Ward at mward1@my.multnomah.edu for details.

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Amidst personal pain: How God used Multnomah in one student’s life

No Comments » Written on April 10th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Students

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Dear Multnomah Family,

I am continually amazed at the powerful, transforming work God does through the lives of our students. I recently heard the incredible story of Zach Muñoz, a recent graduate who illustrates how Multnomah continues to shape disciples who love the Savior.

Zach’s earliest memory is of pressing his hand against the glass divider that stood between him and his mother. She was in prison. Zach was three years old. Up until that point, his mother had grappled with drug addiction. New boyfriends trickled in and out of her home. Many of them abused Zach.

Zach was able to escape when his grandmother, his only semblance of a mother, stepped in to raise him. But at age six, he had to move in with his father. He was routinely exposed to emotional and verbal abuse. He joined a gang at age 14.

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When Zach was 17, his life took a sharp turn when he met Jesus for the first time. Three years later, he enrolled at Multnomah University. During his first semester, his father died unexpectedly. Zach’s family wrongly blamed him for his father’s death and ultimately disowned him. He inherited his father’s astronomical debt, including many hospital bills, all while he was still 20. The following semester, the grandmother who raised him died too.

With no family and no money, Zach became homeless and lived out of his car to stay in classes. Multnomah was the only home he had. Overcome with hopelessness, Zach turned to alcohol to forget his pain. His faith was gone.  Everything he held onto slipped through his fingers like sand. God didn’t seem to be who he claimed he was in the Bible. If God was love, then why was this happening?

One of Zach’s professors, Dr. Ray Lubeck, and his wife Tamara, heard about Zach’s situation and invited him into their home with open arms. Tamara cooked dinner for Zach, a seemingly insignificant gesture, but it made an enormous impact on him. It began to draw him back into the loving arms of the Savior.

Hear some of Dr. Lubeck's reflections on that time:

Another professor, Dr. Jay Held, would close each class by saying to his students, “If you forget everything that I teach you, remember that I love you. I really do.” These words resonated deep inside Zach’s heart.

God was slowly building up to a transformational moment in Zach’s life. Finally, he connected with Zach’s heart during a Hebrew class. Dr. Becky Josberger and her students were reading the first of the Ten Commandments:

“You shall not have any other gods before me.”

Zach discovered the nuance behind the words “before me.” They come from the Hebrew words “al-panay,” which can also mean “before my face.” Zach realized God wanted a personal, face to face relationship with him. With tears streaming down his face in the middle of class, he re-encountered God in all his glory and love.

We had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Josberger and hear about her memory of that special day:

Zach graduated last May with dreams of becoming a Hebrew professor. He wants to serve students the way his Multnomah professors served him. What an amazing story!

I’ve been studying the book of Daniel lately, and something stood out to me during a recent reading. In Daniel 4:2, Daniel tells the king,

“It is my pleasure to tell you about the miraculous signs and wonders that the Most High God has performed for me.”

As President of Multnomah, I can also say that it’s my pleasure to tell you of the miraculous signs and wonders God continues to perform in and through students like Zach. These 25 acres are a catalyst for producing vibrant men and women of character who love the Word and are deeply in love with the Savior.

That’s why we need your help now more than ever!

Your sacrificial and generous gifts help students like Zach afford to stay at Multnomah. Will you consider giving to help our students, many of whom are going through financial hardships and personal crises? Gifts of all sizes are celebrated and appreciated.

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We are grateful for participation at every level. Gifts like $10, $20, $50, or $100 each make a significant impact! Click on the button below to give for students like Zach, whose lives were dramatically changed by being here!

Thank you for supporting this amazing community, and for furthering the mission of Multnomah.

Faithfully,

Rev. G. Craig Williford, Ph.D.
President

Two Hebrew students selected for research trip in Israel

Comments Off on Two Hebrew students selected for research trip in Israel Written on March 28th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, General, Press Releases, Programs, Seminary, Students, Theology

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Multnomah seminary students Chad Woodward and Alyssa Schmid will embark on a one-of-a-kind research excursion this summer in Israel. The two Hebrew students will partake in several archaeological digs, take various tours of the Holy Land and learn about Israel’s history from the Bronze and Iron Ages up through the modern day.

Woodward views the trip as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. “It’s always been my desire to experience the Holy Land and see the places mentioned in Scripture,” he says. “I think this trip has a great mix of work and sight-seeing.”

The month-long expedition is made possible by the Scholars Initiative, the research arm of the Museum of the Bible, one of the world’s largest private collections of rare biblical texts and artifacts. Multnomah has been connected with the Scholars Initiative since 2013, when Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz was chosen to translate a fragment of the Dead Sea Scrolls with four of his students.

Since then, MU has been trusted with even more research projects, which opened the door for students to apply for trips sponsored by the Scholars Initiative. Over the past three years, seven Hebrew students have been selected to attend the Logos Conference, a two-week internship at Oxford. Similar to the Oxford internship, the Israel trip is limited to students working on Scholars Initiative projects.

Kutz couldn’t be more proud of his students. He views the trip as a great addition to Woodward and Schmid’s academic experience.  “The chance to work on a dig is a tremendous opportunity,” he says. “The students will get to see firsthand how the archaeological process works and learn from scholars who have devoted their lives to this area of study.”

The trip, which starts in Jerusalem in mid-June and ends in Bethlehem in mid-July, will be an immense privilege for Woodward and Schmid, who are already so familiar with the ancient Near East. As the two students travel, they will take with them all the passions and skills gained during their time at Multnomah.

“I’m honestly humbled by this,” says Woodward. “I think the Hebrew program really supports their students well and creates amazing opportunities.”

Redesigned programs offer greater flexibility to seminary students

Comments Off on Redesigned programs offer greater flexibility to seminary students Written on March 23rd, 2017 by
Categories: Seminary, Students

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PORTLAND, Ore. – Multnomah University is redesigning its seminary degrees to help students balance the academic demands of the programs with the responsibilities of everyday life. The changes, which involve reducing the number of required credits to earn MA and MDiv degrees, will take effect in fall 2017.

“We recognize that getting through seminary can be a balancing act,” said Derek Chinn, dean of Multnomah Biblical Seminary. “Students have a variety of priorities that can include a spouse, children, work, church responsibilities and social life. The reduction in credits and courses required for a seminary degree helps our students graduate sooner while reducing their financial liabilities.”

The core components of the MDiv and MA programs have been retained with slight reductions in credit hours and coursework. For the MDiv, the elective pool also has increased to 13 credits, allowing students to focus on their specific degree tracks and strengthen their studies based on their calling.

“The quality of the program has not been lessened in any way,” Chinn said. “All of the core elements have been retained. In addition, the redesign puts a greater emphasis on degree personalization and faculty mentorship so students can craft the MDiv to match their intended life goals.”

Chinn noted that some students have struggled to complete the three- and two-year programs on time. The redesigned programs respond to that reality and allow students to get into full-time ministry sooner.

“We view ourselves as partners in their education,” Chinn said. “By giving students a little more margin in terms of time and money, we’re hoping this will help them manage the obligations they have toward others, work and church.”

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with a teaching site in Reno, Nevada. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

Multnomah University launches six-year Doctor of Chiropractic program

Comments Off on Multnomah University launches six-year Doctor of Chiropractic program Written on March 15th, 2017 by
Categories: General, Press Releases, Programs, Students

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PORTLAND, Ore. – The path to a career in medicine just became a little less daunting for biology majors at Multnomah University.

MU is teaming up with University of Western States to offer an accelerated program that allows students to earn a Doctor of Chiropractic degree in six years. The program involves three years of biology at Multnomah and three years of study at UWS, saving students an entire year of academic work and tuition compared to the traditional DC route.

“This is a first for us – this is a new day,” said Dr. Daniel Scalberg, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Multnomah. “It means that we’re now in the same league as Portland State and Oregon State, who have the same agreement. For students who are motivated, they can be a fully certified DC six years from the time they arrive at MU.”

Under the agreement, MU students will be admitted to UWS when they complete the pre-chiropractic program with a minimum 3.25 GPA. They’ll finish their fourth year of undergraduate work at UWS to earn their biology degree, and then they’ll be poised to wrap up the DC program two years later.

Multnomah students will have access to state-of-the-art lab facilities and equipment at UWS, which offers numerous degree options for aspiring allied health professionals. Students also will have access to the admissions staff at UWS to ensure a smooth transition between schools.

“Our students will be able to call their Admissions office anytime, and their folks will be excited,” Scalberg said. “They will welcome our students as their own.”

For more information, visit the Doctor of Chiropractic page.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with a teaching site in Reno, Nevada. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

About University of Western States

University of Western States, located in Portland, Oregon, offers a Doctor of Chiropractic degree program; master’s programs in Exercise and Sports Science; Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine; and Sports Medicine; master’s and doctoral programs in Sport and Performance Psychology; and a Massage Therapy certificate program. The university also provides health services in four Portland locations through the Health Centers of UWS clinic system.

MU celebrates second annual Encouragement Week

Comments Off on MU celebrates second annual Encouragement Week Written on March 13th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Students

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This week is officially the mid-semester mark. That means students will be surrounded by study guides, lecture notes, and textbooks as they prepare for mid-term tests and projects. That is why last week was a great time for some extra encouragement from MU faculty and staff.

Last week Multnomah celebrated its second annual Encouragement Week, when faculty and staff go out of their way to give students a little extra love before a stressful time of the school year. Associate Dean of Students Rich Ward, the man behind Encouragement Week’s creation, wants every student to feel that they matter and belong. “Students lead a lot of things on campus to show other students they are cared for, but this is one thing where we can make all students receivers,” says Ward.

There were signs of encouragement all around campus. In the JCA Student Center, there were posters with motivational words and students wearing bracelets with the hashtag #YouGotThisMU.  The registrar’s office is where these bracelets could be found, along with postcards that had an inspirational Bible verse printed on them. These postcards also have a comforting hashtag, #GodHasYou. The Marketing Department made various '80s-style buttons that were handed out in chapel.

“Jesus was about giving encouragement and showing love,” says Administrative Assistant to the Registrar Camilla Dolan. “In today’s culture with diverse opinions and views, it is easy to forget how to love one another, but we all need encouragement.”

Ward believes that on a practical level, positive messaging is just a good idea. “To know a specific person and institution cares about you helps develop a sense of belonging, which can lead to persistence in tougher times,” says Ward. His goal is that this positive event will become a tradition at Multnomah for years to come so that students will feel loved and encouraged in stressful times.

English major Monica Paterson shared a story about the encouragement she received this week: “The library staff is always loving and welcoming, but this week they put forth extra hospitality with quotes, snacks, and pieces of encouragement in our mail,” she says. “Thank you for being so encouraging!”

This post was written by global studies major and Marketing Assistant Meghan Krause.

Hebrew, Th.M. student accepted to Ph.D. program at Wheaton

Comments Off on Hebrew, Th.M. student accepted to Ph.D. program at Wheaton Written on March 6th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Press Releases, Programs, Seminary, Students, Theology

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Master of Theology and Hebrew student Daniel Somboonsiri has been accepted to the Ph.D. in Biblical & Theological Studies program under Dr. Daniel Carroll Rodas at Wheaton College. Congratulations, Daniel!

What does this opportunity mean to you?

I'm really still in shock over having been chosen. I knew a few years ago that Dr. Carroll Rodas was the mentor who could best equip me for the research I want to do. I started reading his books, and the books he had read. We started emailing back and forth so that I could do whatever it took to be mentored by him.

After years of preparation, I was the one person chosen this year to work with Dr. Carroll Rodas. While I still do not know how God will provide for my family during my Ph.D. studies, I am overjoyed to have been selected. I had a rough childhood. To be where I am today is the miraculous grace of God, for which I am gratefully undeserving.

How has MU’s Hebrew program helped get you to where you are now?

Multnomah has one of the best Hebrew programs in the world. Though it is a smaller university, our Hebrew program is highly esteemed by those in academia who know of it. During the interview process, I was never asked to prove my capability with Hebrew. It seemed as though my Ph.D. supervisor was well aware of the language training I had received. Beyond the nuts and bolts of knowing the biblical languages, I was given the opportunity through Multnomah to co-author three papers on three unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls. While there was a lot of "on the job" learning for these projects and help from my academic mentors, those projects are now listed on my CV and likely helped me get noticed in the highly competitive Ph.D. application process.

My Ph.D. research will also lean heavily on what I have learned through The Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins. My research will integrate cultural studies and the Hebrew Prophets. Dr. Paul Metzger has been instrumental in training me to be an astute student of cultural issues and their relevance to biblical studies. Through my work with New Wine, I was given the opportunity to serve as editor on "Prophetic Lament" by Soong-Chan Rah, which also contributed to my development and application for Ph.D. studies. During the Ph.D. interview process, I was asked about my involvement with New Wine on issues such as interfaith dialogue and advocacy for the poor. In all, it is the overall development process, both academic and spiritual, which has prepared me to move on to study and teach at the highest level.

What are the highlights of MU’s Hebrew program?

We, the MU Hebrew family, do life together. We bond through learning the Hebrew Scriptures. We learn and pray together. This probably wouldn't happen at a larger university. The classroom size allows Dr. Becky Josberger and Dr. Karl Kutz to really invest in our lives and foster community.

Dr. Kutz, with the help of Dr. Josberger, has put together a method for teaching biblical Hebrew that is unlike anything else. They teach Hebrew in a way that brings the language to life and allows it to stick without memorizing hundreds of rules and charts.

What are you hoping to do with your Ph.D.?

My emphasis will be on social ethics in the Hebrew Prophets. My research proposal is to look at Micah through the lens of the social sciences and literary analysis to show how Micah can in part be recognized as social theory. In Micah, God condemns an wicked society that fosters poverty and oppression of all sorts. In contrast, Micah envisions a future world ruled by God in which nations live together in community without war and oppression.

While my Ph.D. work will focus on the book of Micah in its ancient context, my life's goal is to research, teach, and write on how the biblical prophets can serve to shape the life of the Church and the Church's engagement of culture in ever changing contexts.

Want to read more student stories? Check out our student stories page!

What I learned at the Global Missions Conference: A student’s perspective

Comments Off on What I learned at the Global Missions Conference: A student’s perspective Written on February 28th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Students, Theology

Global studies major and Marketing Assistant Meghan Krause shares her perspective on this year’s Global Missions Conference. 

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Dr. Karen Fancher speaks at MU's 77th annual Global Missions Conference.

This past week, Multnomah hosted the 77th annual Global Ministries Conference, or GMC. The GMC’s slogan for this year was, “Cultivating Renewal: Back to the Beginning.” A team of five students, led by Dr. Greg Burch, brought this whole conference together. These five students were Jamilyn Cummings, Moriah Paterson, Kara Swanson, Annica Davis and Jared Stone. From the decorations, to the advertisements, to the selection of speakers and guests, these five students confronted all of us about creation care and the part we play in this topic.

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From left to right: Moriah Paterson, Jared Stone, Jamilyn Cummings, Annica Davis, McKenzie Chapman and Kara Swanson.

GMC2One of the students from this team was senior Jared Stone, the GMC’s logistics coordinator, whom I caught up with as everything concluded. “The GMC went better than I even expected — from the coordination of decorations, to the responses the skits received, to the talk I have overheard from fellow students about the workshops,” he said. “It was great to bring the topic of creation care to the table for us as Christian students.” His statement appears to speak for itself from my observations.

As a student, I attended every plenary session that featured the keynote speakers, Dr. Miriam Adeney and Dr. A.J. Swoboda. With conviction, these two speakers connected Christianity and creation care on theological and practical bases. I attended a decent amount of the workshops as well. From these workshops, a few things definitively stuck with me. For example, La Montana exemplified how ministry and creation care can be quite interconnected. Dr. A.J Swoboda showed the significance and rejuvenation that keeping the Sabbath can have in all areas of life.

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Another thing that I observed during these workshops was fellow students pursuing knowledge and connections that would guide them in their journey of creation care. Questions like, “What can I do as an individual?” were thrown around, and answers were given that ranged from education and advocacy to living a simpler life. I myself, and many others, also enjoyed networking and learning from the many missions organizations that came to this year’s GMC. Meeting with individuals representing different organizations gave the GMC a personal touch, as students could find specific ministries that called to them.

GMC3A final aspect of this conference that students seemed to enjoy was the worship, led by Caleb Schmidt from Youth With A Mission. Every day I saw different students having intent conversations with Schmidt. So, I decided to ask about his experience at the GMC. “The best part has been seeing students encounter God and the concept of living present-centered lives,” he said. “The hospitality here has been amazing, and I love the heart for missions I have seen.”

Whether it was the plenary sessions, the call to creation care, or individual connections, the 77th GMC had something to offer to each member of the Multnomah community.