Students

‘It’s intimate learning’: Johanna Ohmes shares passion for history program

No Comments » Written on June 30th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

Johanna Ohmes is fascinated by stories. She loves seeing the way they connect, intertwine and build upon each other in the present and the past. That’s why she was drawn to Multnomah’s history program.

Ohmes chose Multnomah after attending community college for a year. “I desired a common worldview where I could be comfortable expressing my beliefs and building on what I already had,” she says. “I love the small class environment, engaging with professors and not being lost in a sea of people. It’s intimate learning.”

Hanna2Diving into historical studies has made Ohmes think like never before. “History works with my brain,” she says. “I get to see the process behind social change and enter into different worlds. It’s creative, relevant, gives my mind something to chew on, and it creates empathy.”

While she’s been at Multnomah, Ohmes has maximized her time in the study of the past and present. She toured the nooks and crannies of London with her history professor and fellow students, she worked at a museum in Germany over the summer, and she is fully engaged in class discussions. “I lose track of time because of how good my classes are,” she says.

Studying history constantly points her to God’s design for humanity. “I love seeing God’s fingerprints on the human story,” she says. “I can see where he has worked.”

Ohmes can also see God’s fingerprints on the people around her at Multnomah. “I’ve found it fascinating to see so many people and stories,” she says. “There is both diversity and unity. This has enhanced my view of diversity among Christians.”

But the history program hasn’t come without paradigm shifts. “It’s both affirmed and challenged my thinking,” Ohmes says. “We talk about challenging issues. I’m forced to wrestle with my faith. It’s given me a stronger framework and filled in the gaps where I didn’t understand.”

Ohmes is excited to find out how her story will fit into the big picture. “Studying history is very general,” she says. “It helps train the way I think about processes and context. It will turn into an occupation, but I don’t know what yet.” Whatever it is, she’ll be ready to integrate it into her story.

Doctor of Ministry program strengthens Chris Haughee’s child welfare chaplaincy

Comments Off on Doctor of Ministry program strengthens Chris Haughee’s child welfare chaplaincy Written on June 22nd, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Seminary, Students

Chris Haughee has worked with children and teens for more than 15 years. He’s heard many stories, listened to many heartbreaks and learned many names. Now, as a chaplain at Intermountain Residential Services — a child welfare agency in Montana — he is fostering an atmosphere of love. “As I walk forward in advocacy for children, I am walking with Jesus,” he says. “I am embraced by a love that transcends me.”

Haughee earned his Master of Divinity degree at Multnomah from 1996 to 2000 while pastoring nearby. In 2005, he took a pastoral call in Helena, Montana. While serving the congregation of First Presbyterian Church, he continued his education at Fuller Theological Seminary, where he pursued his doctorate for two years. A series of personal and professional curve balls upset the smooth road he’d envisioned and caused Haughee to question if education was for him. “I needed a program that provided the flexibility for me to continue [my ministry] and make connections between the children I serve and the work of the Kingdom,” he says.

Chris_mainHe found this combination in the cultural engagement track of MU’s Doctor of Ministry program. “The cohort in cultural engagement allows the freedom to explore themes of advocacy alongside brothers and sisters in Christ from a wide range of backgrounds and ministry settings,” he says.

This support is especially valuable due to the nature of Haughee’s ministry. “It means a great deal when you are doing the often hard and lonely work of advocacy for an underserved and misunderstood part of the church,” he says. “It’s a journey closer to the heart of God embodied in the crucified Savior.”

Haughee’s studies are effectively being transferred to his work environment. He is intentional about fostering spiritual discussions with staff members at Intermountain. In a recent conversation, they connected Jesus’ Beatitudes with the work of healing emotionally disturbed children. “There were a few tears shed as we realized that despite our best efforts, the brokenness of this world is something only God can ultimately heal,” Haughee says. “We may not see the fruits of our labors on behalf of many of these children, but still we have to keep pressing forward and doing the best we can for as many as we can for as long as we can.”

The work inside and outside the classroom is a battle. Haughee is careful to cultivate the attitude of a listener in all of his interactions. “The world is filled with people talking,” he says. “I don’t need to add to the noise. A Spirit-empowered whisper will achieve more than the bullhorn shout of the self-righteous and self-assured.”

Haughee’s leadership has also been enhanced through his studies. “I am more balanced, more humble, and more grateful for the small influence I do have,” he says. “I know Christ better and can serve the church more ably as a result of my time at Multnomah.”

When he’s not perusing an article or engaging in class conversation, Haughee can be found organizing activities, fundraising for Christmas gifts, or simply eating barbeque with the children in his ministry. He is daily being transformed by love. “It is a love that shows me I have more to gain in this work than I have to give,” he says.

Seeing the bigger picture: How MU is making a difference

Comments Off on Seeing the bigger picture: How MU is making a difference Written on May 31st, 2016 by
Categories: Newsletter, Pray For MU, Students

Recently I was flying home from the East Coast. As I looked down, I thought about how much perspective changes everything. The view from 30,000 feet is radically different than the one on ground level. Life moves fast, and often times we don’t see the bigger picture.

From God’s vantage point, the seemingly small activities on earth come into focus as part of a much larger picture. At Multnomah, we do lots of educational and biblical activities daily. Sometimes we wonder what the big picture looks like. Are we making a difference? A recent story illustrates that we are!

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The Patersons

Nineteen years ago, a divorce ripped through the Paterson family. Seven siblings were scattered to pursue separate lives. But God had plans to reconstruct what was broken, and Multnomah would play an important role.

Monica was introduced to MU by a brother who lives in Oregon. When she visited campus, she immediately felt at home. “I was sold when my tour guide told me professors pray with their students,” she said. But Monica had three conditions for attending: her sister had to attend, all expenses had to be paid, and she had to be able to live with her sister at some point.

Dirks_Chapel_In_Spring-alt01Monica’s sister (who will be kept anonymous due to her field of work) was a missionary in Budapest. She was convinced she would never return to America. But God had different plans. One day He asked her: Will you go to America? Her immediate answer was, “No!” But gradually her heart softened. “Finally, I realized God is sovereign, faithful and knows best,” she said. So, with encouragement from her brother in Oregon, she applied to MU.

In the meantime, another brother, Jonathan, was in Missouri contemplating seminary. When he heard his sisters were headed to Multnomah, and that scholarships had helped make it affordable, he enrolled at Multnomah Biblical Seminary. “Soon my wife and I had jobs and a place to live,” he said. “My chances even looked
good to graduate debt-free.”

The family members settled into their studies and began to invest in one another. “God sent me to the best college for teaching me how to love,” Monica said. “The focus of this school is relationships.” She even plans to room with her sister in the near future, which fulfills her last requirement. It’s a testimony of God’s hand in even the smallest details.

Jonathan used to only see his sisters annually, but now he interacts with them daily, even if it’s just exchanging a hug in the hallway. “I’m getting to know them again,” he said. Next year, a fourth Paterson will join his siblings in Oregon. The scattered pieces are being gathered at last.

This is the big picture. Multnomah was a place of healing for this family because of God’s work through the faculty, staff, alumni and friends who support MU with their prayers, service and giving.

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A few weeks ago, we celebrated 115 godly men and women who walked across the stage during graduation. Whether these graduates work for churches, nonprofits, local schools or corporate America, be encouraged that they know the Scriptures well and have high ambitions to transform the world for Jesus Christ! They were truly blessed by those who gave generously to Multnomah, and we challenged them to give back by supporting the students who come after them.

I want to urge you, like Paul urged the Corinthians, to participate in a collection for Multnomah students like our graduates and the Patersons. When Paul wanted churches across the ancient Mediterranean world to assist the needy in Jerusalem, he wrote these words in 1 Corinthians 16:1-2:

“Now about the collection for the Lord’s people: Do what I told the Galatian churches to do. On the first day of every week, each one of you should set aside a sum of money in keeping with your income, saving it up, so that when I come no collections will have to be made.”

This is the message I’m sending our alumni and friends today. Every dollar we receive by June 30, 2016, will be matched thanks to God’s provision through a generous giver. We still need $211,445 to meet our scholarship goal. Would you ask God what part you might play in a student’s life by submitting a gift? Together we’re a part of God’s big picture!

Gratefully,

G. Craig Williford

President, Multnomah University

give now

Multnomah students make dorm life their business

Comments Off on Multnomah students make dorm life their business Written on May 19th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Programs, Students

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Marketing professor Michael Hohn doesn’t like fake case studies. He prefers bringing the curriculum to life by instigating legitimate projects with real impact. That’s exactly what his Sales and Marketing class did last semester.

Director of Student Life Kim Stave “hired” Hohn’s class to help her department answer an important question: How can Multnomah University increase occupancy in the dorms? The business majors divided into three teams to create a value proposition, conduct research, gather data and analyze their findings. This allowed them to offer evidence-based recommendations to their client.

“As we worked on the project, it was awesome to see how we were immediately able to apply what we were learning in class,” says business student Valerie Wakefield.

Her classmate Robbie Miller concurs. “Our business classes taught us that we’d need extensive and thorough research to do a good job on this project.”

The amount of data they gathered even kept Hohn on his toes. “It was the most memorable of any projects that I can remember!” he says.

After administering a competitive analysis, Miller and his team came up with a few proposals to make dorm life more attractive, such as planning more student events on campus and adding a new communal student area. “A long-term goal is to create a space for students to gather other than the JCA,” Miller explains. “It’d be a space where people would walk to and not walk through.”

At the culmination of their work, the students presented their findings to the judges, a group of faculty and staff members, including Business Department Chair Lee Sellers and Multnomah University President Craig Williford. The teams were judged on the depth and scope of their research as well as the quality of their recommendations. The group with the winning proposal was awarded dinner at Portland City Grill with Sellers, Williford and Stave.

Although the students are young in their careers, Stave and her department found their work extremely helpful. “Our students are intelligent and creative, and they came up with some ideas that we will certainly consider implementing,” says Stave. “The fact that all three groups, each approaching the project from a different angle, came to some of the same conclusions was significant to me.”

The students feel confident that the experience afforded them important skills for their future jobs. “This project was good practice on how to communicate well with group members and stay on the same page,” says Miller.

Wakefield agrees. “I was able to practice skills that are useful in most any profession,” she says. “I’ve even applied some things we learned in my everyday interactions!”

Spring graduates reflect on time well spent

Comments Off on Spring graduates reflect on time well spent Written on May 9th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Students

Last Friday, 115 Multnomah students walked across the stage of Rolling Hills Community Church to receive their diplomas. Among them were Abigail Buckley, Brian Hall, Mandee Campos, Dae Kim, Nancy Anderson and Santino Cantalupo, six students who picked up much more than a quality education at MU. They took some time to reflect on what they’ve learned, how they’ve changed and where they plan to go next.

Abigail Buckley

Abigail BuckleyHometown
Vancouver, Wash.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a minor in History

Favorite MU experience
Probably being a student worker. It made me feel more informed about the school. I started in Financial Aid, then worked as Dr. Scalberg’s teacher’s assistant, and then I worked in Advancement. They all took care of me and understood that my homework came first. It was really fun – I loved my time as a student worker.

Favorite class
Oh, but there are so many! Prophets with Dr. Josberger and History and Poetry with Dr. Koivisto were both great, and so was History and Christianity with Dr. Scalberg. In History and Christianity, we saw how different movements and authors affected the shape of evangelicalism. We traced back our own influences. It shows you where you come from, and you learn how denominations and people groups brought you together.

Favorite thing about MU
The relationships the professors build with their students. I feel pretty confident saying every student has one teacher they can look back on – someone who cared for them personally. I’m not going to necessarily remember the classes, but I’m going to remember who taught the classes.

Favorite thing about Portland
It’s central to so many places. If you want to go to the beach or the mountains for the day, you can do that. Whatever you like to do, you can find it.

Plans after graduation
I’m going to keep on teaching. (She currently teaches Spanish 1-3 to high school students at Cedar Tree Classical Christian School in Ridgefield, Wash.) I’m so grateful for the opportunity.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I took Senior Theology this semester with Dr. Gurney. You have to write eight doctrinal statements. It was daunting at first and rather intimidating. Not only do you have to write on what you believe, but you also have to find the scripture to back it up. For that reason alone, MU taught me not to shy away from issues. The professors are willing to bring up issues and foster an environment where it’s safe to talk about them.

Advice to your first-year self
I didn’t do as many on-campus and off-campus activities because I was a commuter and worked in the evening. Your experience here is what you make it. I wish I had taken advantage of getting to know more of the people here. You have a short amount of time, and it goes fast.

Brian Hall

Brian HallHometown
Yucca Valley, Calif.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a second major in Youth Ministry

Favorite MU experience
Learning how to do ministry with my wife. We met during our freshman year and got married that first summer. The education that I received from MU was great, but the experience of being able to do ministry as newlyweds with the Hildebrands as role models has been invaluable.

Favorite class
Out of all the classes I’ve taken at MU, there are two that have stood out: Spiritual Formation of Youth with Dr. Rob Hildebrand and Mission with Children at Risk with Dr. Greg Burch.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love living in the city! I come from a town where the fanciest restaurant is Applebee’s and the only things to do are walk around Walmart or go to the four-screen movie theater. I love having the city at my fingertips! The food is great here, and there are always things to do!

Favorite thing about MU
The youth ministry program. In-class education is really only a small part of the degree. The opportunities that Rob provides to go to Germany or Japan, or to work on Spring Thaw, is what really makes this education so unique and practical.

Plans after graduation
I am planning on pursuing my Master of Arts in Christian Leadership with an emphasis in Counseling and Care at Multnomah Biblical Seminary.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
Before coming to MU, my knowledge of the Bible was limited to the classic Bible stories like Adam and Eve, David and Goliath, Jesus, etc. It seemed like a series of random stories were just thrown into one bigger book. The Bible classes here have taught me that the Bible is one whole story. This has impacted my spiritual journey by opening my eyes to the plan that God does have for my life. I may feel like I’m wandering in the desert, but I know that there’s a promise for me up ahead.

Advice to your first-year self
Take advantage of your time at Multnomah. Don’t just be here for the degree. Your teachers have so much to offer you outside of the classroom setting, but they’ll only be able to offer it to you if you start the conversation. Hone your strengths while you’re here too. Again, don’t just be here for the degree. A piece of paper isn’t going to teach you to study the Bible, prepare a sermon or build a life-sized Mario Kart track.

Mandee Campos

Mandee CamposHometown
Beaverton, Ore. (I’ve lived in a lot of places, but Beaverton is probably my favorite.)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Best MU experience
I liked being in a cohort and sharing experiences with them. It’s neat to share in the journey. I enjoyed the Bible prerequisites – there were many mind-blowing moments.

Favorite class
I struggle to pick a favorite class, so I’ll go with most impactful: Theology of Cultural Engagement with Dr. Metzger. It was a good foundation to begin working from a Trinitarian perspective.

Favorite thing about MU
With all the seminary professors and theology professors you have, I really like that everyone isn’t saying the same thing – they each say things that put tension on what the others have said. I think that’s a good thing because you get to see different perspectives.

Favorite thing about Portland
The food. You can get almost any type of food. I love Chinese and Indian and Thai. Food is the best way to understand and relate to one another.

Plans after graduation
I’m working with a nonprofit called Lahash International that partners with grassroots initiatives in East Africa. I’ll be working as the Servant Teams Coordinator.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This program especially has taught me to listen well to people, to affirm their dignity. When you’re in fellowship with people, you’ll learn a lot about faith and about God that you wouldn’t otherwise. If you want to see Jesus, be in relation with people outside of your context. That’s how he did it in scripture.

Advice to your first-year self
Always seek to learn from a given situation. Some people take for granted a privilege they’ve been given. Much of the world wasn’t given the opportunities we’ve been given. Believers are called to seek excellence, so be willing to learn and learn well.

Dae Kim

Dae KimHometown
Northern Virginia (I moved around a lot)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Favorite MU experience
We had an event last semester every Thursday where we’d take turns sharing our testimony. Sharing my testimony and listening to others throughout the semester was a great experience. We’d pray for one another.

Favorite class
Hmmm. Last year, I took Conflict, Refugees and Complex Disasters with Dr. Karen Fancher. My heart is for the Middle East. She talked a lot about Syrian and Sudanese refugees. I’m not necessarily critical of what I hear, but after this class, I learned to become more critical, and I researched more on certain topics. What the media shares doesn’t give us the whole picture. Whatever they say is pretty biased, so I want to hear different angles. This was a big takeaway.

Favorite thing about MU
I was impressed that professors connect issues with Jesus Christ. Sometimes people think Christians just praise God on Sundays. But here, professors connect the Bible with every subject, and they ask what it means to follow Jesus in this messy world. It’s a unique thing MU has to offer.

Plans after graduation
First of all, I’m going to China on May 31 for one month– I’ve already bought the ticket. I really have a heart for the Middle East, so I’ll also be connecting with organizations in Lebanon. Right now I’m talking to an organization in Egypt about an internship in August. I’m also working on joining the Peace Corps; if that works out, I’ll be in Albania for two years too.

How has MU impacted your spiritual journey
I’ve met many spiritual mentors here. People I’ve gotten to know through my professors, my friends, my cohort. They’re always praying for me. Nothing in my future is for sure, but I trust God. There were times I was struggling with theological issues. But since my time at MU, I’ve learned fellowship is really important.

Nancy Anderson

Nancy AndersonHometown
Portland, Ore.

Program
Master of Divinity, Chaplaincy Track

Favorite MU experience
Interacting with fellow students in an academic and spiritual journey. Most students were an average of 30 years younger than me, but they welcomed me into their lives and were so encouraging and friendly.

Favorite class
Are you kidding? I loved every single one, although some were more challenging than others. The Spiritual Warfare class with Dr. Calvin Blom was a standout for the excellent combination of theology and practical application. But honestly, each class was unique and special. Dr. Stephen Kim’s Bible Survey classes were awesome, and Dr. Baylis and Dr. Metzger are brilliant instructors.

Favorite thing about MU
I love the way that professors allowed us to tailor the learning experience to our personal ministry situations. I was often allowed to adapt assignments to my world of working with the elderly in assisted living, which made the learning experience more meaningful.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love that we have both the ocean experience and mountains available for vacations and exploration. God has blessed my husband and me with 45 years living here as a married couple.

Plans after graduation
Focus on better message preparation for Sunday worship as I continue my ministry as a chaplain in an assisted living community – Hearthstone of Beaverton. I came to Multnomah to become a better-equipped chaplain.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This was the time of learning that I needed to launch myself into a deeper walk with the Lord. I have always loved the Lord, but my faith has been strengthened and deepened by being at Multnomah. I have a far better understanding of the Word of God too.

Advice to your first-year self
Relax and trust God to give you all you need. Yes, do your part and pay attention in class, take good notes, do homework on time, work ahead on the big projects, and then trust God to make your brain work!

Santino Cantalupo

Santino CantalupoHometown
Reno, Nev.

Program
Master of Divinity

Favorite MU experience
Coming up for a summer intensive and getting out of a class early and climbing to the top of Multnomah Falls at the suggestion of my professor. It was a beautiful hike and allowed me to connect with God’s creation.

Favorite class
Preaching Narrative Literature

Favorite thing about MU
I love the opportunity that MU has given to distance students, especially to the growing student base in Reno, Nev.

Plans after graduation
I feel called to lead a church as a senior pastor, and I’m pursuing my Doctor of Ministry degree at Duke.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I have grown more spiritually during my time in seminary than any other time in my life. This journey has been strenuous and at times filled with suffering and loss, but often it was a conversation with a professor or a student that allowed me to refocus my eyes on Christ.

Advice to your first-year self
Never take a theology class and a Bible class at the same time. Ever.

Students partner with local nonprofit providing free clothes for foster kids

Comments Off on Students partner with local nonprofit providing free clothes for foster kids Written on May 5th, 2016 by
Categories: Students

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Rhonda Meadows is beaming as she welcomes six Multnomah students to her cheery storefront inside the Lloyd Center Mall. Once the group gathers in a semi-circle, the HR Management class from MU’s business program presents her with two handbooks. Meadows thumbs through the pages as the students explain their work. She likes what she sees. “I just want to applaud you,” she says, looking around at each business major. “You guys did such an amazing job. This really helps us.”

Meadows is the founder of Project Lemonade, a nonprofit providing free back-to-school clothes and shoes for local foster kids. “It really has to do with the saying, ‘If life gives you lemons, make lemonade,’” she says. “That’s what we do in this store every day.” Since 2012, the organization has served over 6,300 foster youth from 16 counties.

IMG_3818Louis Idlett, Lindsey Weaver, Sadie Jenks, Preston Brooks, Michael Kamlade and Tyler Bickley are the interns supporting this mission. Over the past semester, they have collaborated with Project Lemonade to create volunteer and intern handbooks for the 300 people who keep the nonprofit running. The students’ diligence, flexibility and continual communication made them successful in compiling information about dress codes, store policies and conduct for future interns and volunteers.

What with the staff’s crammed schedules and limited resources, the students’ involvement offered Project Lemonade some much-needed relief.  “We’ve tried to partner with other schools before, and it hasn’t been as beneficial,” says Meadows. “We didn’t put forth as much time with this group – they did a lot on their own. They really stretched our vision.”

The pairing proved to be a winning combo. The business majors were able to help the busy nonprofit all while gaining priceless experience for their future careers. Brooks attributed much of the project’s success to the training his group received in previous classes. “The business program prepared (us) by giving us a lot of team projects in the past,” says the senior. “We were able to really work well as a team on this project.”

In the midst of it all, Professor Ted Takamura encourages his students to represent Christ in every interaction. Servant leadership is a constant theme he emphasizes. “Compassion comes from Christ,” he says. “We want (our students) to be different. I ask them to be points of light.”

The opportunity for goodwill was particularly exciting to Brooks. “Being able to meet the people we were working with, see the store and make this project something that would really help them and help these foster kids was a highlight,” he says. “It had a lasting effect.”

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Conference teaches church leaders how to respect, engage with science

Comments Off on Conference teaches church leaders how to respect, engage with science Written on April 28th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Seminary, Students

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Many see faith and science like oil and water — they’re impossible to integrate. But New Wine, New Wineskins thinks differently. On April 16 and 23, the institute hosted a conference aimed at dispelling the segregation of these communities through thoughtful dialogue. The conference, Church and Science: Partners for the Common Good, was made possible by a grant Multnomah Biblical Seminary received from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in an effort to integrate science into the seminary curriculum (view the 10 seminary courses that have adopted this integration here).

“It’s bound up with our ongoing, strategic effort at Multnomah to prepare seminary graduates in their pastoral calling to constructively engage our scientific age,” says Paul Louis Metzger, director of New Wine, New Wineskins. “It’s for the sake of their parishioners who have scientific questions and scientific vocational interests, and for the church’s own missional engagement with the surrounding culture.”

The event brought in speakers from Portland and across the country to explore several themes, including the history of faith and science, hermeneutical humility, and faith and scientific methods. Attendants delved into the themes through a variety of formats, such as plenary sessions, panels, workshops and thoughtful discussion times.

“Many young Christians are leaving churches because of what they perceive to be antagonism by the church toward science,” says Metzger. “It’s vitally important that pastors in training are equipped to develop an informed respect for science and discernment on how to articulate biblical faith in our scientific age.”

Many attendees walked away feeling more prepared and aware. “As a pastor, this conference opened my eyes to the tremendous need we have to address the role of science in our faith communities,” says Gaby Viesca, pastor to women at Cedar Mill Bible Church. “It also equipped me with practical tools to help people navigate their own questions and doubts, and how to engage in meaningful conversations around this topic.”

Jared Bennett, associate pastor at Grace Community Church called the conference “phenomenal” and found Dr. John Walton’s session especially insightful. “He stressed that the debate over young earth creationism/evolution is not what we should be focused on; the mechanics of ‘how’ are secondary to the agency of ‘who.’” Bennett claims to have walked away with a lot to think about. “I will continue to read, think and pray on what I learned at the conference in the hope that I can use that personal growth to better pastor my students,” he says.

Join the ongoing discussion. New Wine is hosting forums at local churches, and you can check out their website for information and updates. You can also read endorsements for the Church and Science conference here. Lastly, if you’re a youth pastor, New Wine wants to collaborate with you in order to care for teens wrestling with their faith in the midst of scientific questions. Stay tuned.

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‘A sense of adventure’: Tirzah Allen satisfies her love of travel in the MATESOL program

Comments Off on ‘A sense of adventure’: Tirzah Allen satisfies her love of travel in the MATESOL program Written on April 18th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

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Tirzah Allen has the traveling bug. Immediately after high school she packed her bags and headed to Scotland for a year-long adventure. She worked odd jobs, met people from all different backgrounds and explored the country. “That time planted the seeds of travel in my life,” says Allen, who’s enrolled in the Master of Arts in TESOL program. And it wasn’t long before those seeds started to germinate.

After graduating with a BA in English and communication, Allen began researching grad schools. “I had no idea that MU offered grad programs, but I happened to stumble upon it,” she says. “I chose TESOL because I wanted the ability to open more doors and be challenged continuously. I don’t want to be too comfortable, and I want to keep extending myself. This requires a built-in sense of adventure.”

TIRZAH_ClassThat sense of adventure is being satisfied during her studies at Multnomah. Not only does she have enriching classroom time, but she also teaches weekly, on-campus ESL classes. “This is the full program, plus the tools to succeed,” she says. “I’ve had the opportunity to meet with people from Burma, Vietnam, Cuba and beyond.”

Whether she’s preparing coffee for her customers in Roger’s Café, or bantering with her Cuban students over homework, Allen strives to reflect Jesus in every interaction. “Finding a Christian in a public setting is like finding an agate on the beach,” she says. “There is something that sparkles. I can’t always out rightly incorporate the gospel in every environment, but I can always show others what I believe.”

Allen is also enjoying each of her professors. “These are teachers who really care,” she says. “It emanates from them, and they go above and beyond what is required. Their servants’ hearts are evident. I’m learning that a teacher’s journey is one of servitude. I want to inspire my students to aspire to be more.”

Allen doesn’t know where the seeds of travel will take root. But she does know she has an open heart for wherever God leads her. “I’d love to teach overseas,” she says. “Anywhere, anytime, any way. Wherever God sends I will go. I’m taking my life one step at a time.”

Local nonprofit creates unique internship opportunities for business students

Comments Off on Local nonprofit creates unique internship opportunities for business students Written on April 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Students

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Business Department Chair Lee Sellers is passionate about integrating practical experience into his students’ education. So when Andrew Stone at Kingdom Ministries needed interns to help support his young nonprofit, an on-going partnership was created.

“It seemed like a good opportunity to give young people real world experience while helping the organization grow more efficiently,” says Stone, who started the Portland nonprofit with his father, Multnomah alumnus Kevin Stone. Joined by their families, the father-son team equips ministries in Italy by connecting them to volunteers who serve in their summer camps, English classes and city festivals.

Mike Kamlade, Lindsey Weaver, Miranda Schmillen, Grant Warner and Lucia Morud are the interns supporting this mission. Over the course of the school year, the five business majors have diligently worked in finance, marketing and project management roles to promote, arrange and fund this year’s summer camps. They’ll see the culmination of their work in June when they travel with other Kingdom Ministries volunteers to Italy.

Although they’ve encountered a number of hurdles throughout the planning process, the interns say the hiccups are undeniably constructive. “It's teaching me to adapt to my surroundings and be open to learning new things,” says finance intern Mike Kamlade.

Project management intern Lindsey Weaver had to adapt too. “Once you get out of the classroom and deal with people in real life, it changes things,” she says.“I looked for this kind of opportunity in high school, but nothing ever came up.” Weaver’s duties include liaising with contacts, coordinating schedules and planning trip logistics.

Miranda Schmillen, who’s responsible for tracking donations and budgeting, admits the internship would be much harder if she was unequipped. But luckily she has a semester of accounting under her belt. “My accounting class totally helped me,” says the finance intern.

Stone’s instruction has only built upon students’ knowledge, and his attentiveness has inspired them to do their best. “He’s super ambitious and has these huge ideas, but he’s also hands-on and shows you how to do things,” says Schmillen.

Stone has simply created an optimal space for trial, error and learning.“They’re getting experience they won’t get anywhere else,” he says. “It’s a very safe environment to learn in.”

It may have been safe, but it wasn’t easy. The interns have bonded through shared struggles and successions — and they’ve emerged stronger than ever. “This internship has blessed me more than I expected because of the relationships I've built with the other interns and the Stone family,” says Kamlade. “They are all great people.”

For more information about this internship and Kingdom Ministries, visit BuildingTheKingdom.org.

Mixing Bible with career: business owner joins degree completion program

Comments Off on Mixing Bible with career: business owner joins degree completion program Written on April 7th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

curt

Curt Heitschmidt worked in construction for more than 20 years. His cabinet business was successful, and he was enjoying life with his wife and three kids.

But he was ready for something different.

“I decided to drop everything and finish my degree because I wanted to learn more about business after owning one for so long,” Heitschmidt says. “I knew that I could study business anywhere, but the business and Bible combination was what I really wanted.”

Multnomah stood out as his best option. He applied to the management & ethics program (which recently changed its name to the business management program) in MU’s Degree Completion Program. Heitschmidt was accepted, and he entered the program with anticipation.

Studying business and the Bible with his classmates has not been disappointing. They even make things more fun by bringing food each week to share with each other. “My cohort experience has been a good mix,” he says. “It’s great to come together around a meal and support each other.”

Going back to school is always challenging, and Heitschmidt’s journey is no different. “Chaos is a constant theme in my life right now,” he says. “My family and I have just moved, my wife works nights, and I’m enrolled full-time in the degree completion program.” But he has no regrets. He even insists his homework load has been manageable alongside his other duties.

Heitschmidt says he’ll probably return to construction after he graduates. But he’ll reenter the field with a revived understanding of what it means to combine Bible with career.

“I’m learning that the Bible isn’t just a handbook,” he says. “It never specifically tells you what to do in each situation. You have to figure out how to bring its principles into the work environment.” Multnomah is equipping him with the tools to do just that.