Students

Multnomah University launches six-year doctor of chiropractic program

No Comments » Written on March 15th, 2017 by
Categories: Feature, General, Programs, Students

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PORTLAND, Ore. – The path to a career in medicine just became a little less daunting for biology majors at Multnomah University.

MU is teaming up with University of Western States to offer an accelerated program that allows students to earn a Doctor of Chiropractic degree in six years. The program involves three years of biology at Multnomah and three years of study at UWS, saving students an entire year of academic work and tuition compared to the traditional DC route.

“This is a first for us – this is a new day,” said Dr. Daniel Scalberg, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Multnomah. “It means that we’re now in the same league as Portland State and Oregon State, who have the same agreement. For students who are motivated, they can be a fully certified DC six years from the time they arrive at MU.”

Under the agreement, MU students will be admitted to UWS when they complete the pre-chiropractic program with a minimum 3.25 GPA. They’ll finish their fourth year of undergraduate work at UWS to earn their biology degree, and then they’ll be poised to wrap up the DC program two years later.

Multnomah students will have access to state-of-the-art lab facilities and equipment at UWS, which offers numerous degree options for aspiring allied health professionals. Students also will have access to the admissions staff at UWS to ensure a smooth transition between schools.

“Our students will be able to call their Admissions office anytime, and their folks will be excited,” Scalberg said. “They will welcome our students as their own.”

For more information, visit the Doctor of Chiropractic page.

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About Multnomah University

Multnomah University is a fully accredited, private, non-denominational, Christian institution of higher education located in Portland, Oregon, with a teaching site in Reno, Nevada. Composed of a college, seminary, graduate school, degree completion program and online distance-learning program, Multnomah issues bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees, as well as professional certifications and endorsements. For more information, visit multnomah.edu.

About University of Western States

University of Western States, located in Portland, Oregon, offers a Doctor of Chiropractic degree program; master’s programs in Exercise and Sports Science; Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine; and Sports Medicine; master’s and doctoral programs in Sport and Performance Psychology; and a Massage Therapy certificate program. The university also provides health services in four Portland locations through the Health Centers of UWS clinic system.

MU celebrates second annual Encouragement Week

No Comments » Written on March 13th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Press Releases, Students

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This week is officially the mid-semester mark. That means students will be surrounded by study guides, lecture notes, and textbooks as they prepare for mid-term tests and projects. That is why last week was a great time for some extra encouragement from MU faculty and staff.

Last week Multnomah celebrated its second annual Encouragement Week, when faculty and staff go out of their way to give students a little extra love before a stressful time of the school year. Associate Dean of Students Rich Ward, the man behind Encouragement Week’s creation, wants every student to feel that they matter and belong. “Students lead a lot of things on campus to show other students they are cared for, but this is one thing where we can make all students receivers,” says Ward.

There were signs of encouragement all around campus. In the JCA Student Center, there were posters with motivational words and students wearing bracelets with the hashtag #YouGotThisMU.  The registrar’s office is where these bracelets could be found, along with postcards that had an inspirational Bible verse printed on them. These postcards also have a comforting hashtag, #GodHasYou. The Marketing Department made various '80s-style buttons that were handed out in chapel.

“Jesus was about giving encouragement and showing love,” says Administrative Assistant to the Registrar Camilla Dolan. “In today’s culture with diverse opinions and views, it is easy to forget how to love one another, but we all need encouragement.”

Ward believes that on a practical level, positive messaging is just a good idea. “To know a specific person and institution cares about you helps develop a sense of belonging, which can lead to persistence in tougher times,” says Ward. His goal is that this positive event will become a tradition at Multnomah for years to come so that students will feel loved and encouraged in stressful times.

English major Monica Paterson shared a story about the encouragement she received this week: “The library staff is always loving and welcoming, but this week they put forth extra hospitality with quotes, snacks, and pieces of encouragement in our mail,” she says. “Thank you for being so encouraging!”

This post was written by global studies major and Marketing Assistant Meghan Krause.

Hebrew, Th.M. student accepted to Ph.D. program at Wheaton

No Comments » Written on March 6th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Press Releases, Programs, Seminary, Students, Theology

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Master of Theology and Hebrew student Daniel Somboonsiri has been accepted to the Ph.D. in Biblical & Theological Studies program under Dr. Daniel Carroll Rodas at Wheaton College. Congratulations, Daniel!

What does this opportunity mean to you?

I'm really still in shock over having been chosen. I knew a few years ago that Dr. Carroll Rodas was the mentor who could best equip me for the research I want to do. I started reading his books, and the books he had read. We started emailing back and forth so that I could do whatever it took to be mentored by him.

After years of preparation, I was the one person chosen this year to work with Dr. Carroll Rodas. While I still do not know how God will provide for my family during my Ph.D. studies, I am overjoyed to have been selected. I had a rough childhood. To be where I am today is the miraculous grace of God, for which I am gratefully undeserving.

How has MU’s Hebrew program helped get you to where you are now?

Multnomah has one of the best Hebrew programs in the world. Though it is a smaller university, our Hebrew program is highly esteemed by those in academia who know of it. During the interview process, I was never asked to prove my capability with Hebrew. It seemed as though my Ph.D. supervisor was well aware of the language training I had received. Beyond the nuts and bolts of knowing the biblical languages, I was given the opportunity through Multnomah to co-author three papers on three unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls. While there was a lot of "on the job" learning for these projects and help from my academic mentors, those projects are now listed on my CV and likely helped me get noticed in the highly competitive Ph.D. application process.

My Ph.D. research will also lean heavily on what I have learned through The Institute for the Theology of Culture: New Wine, New Wineskins. My research will integrate cultural studies and the Hebrew Prophets. Dr. Paul Metzger has been instrumental in training me to be an astute student of cultural issues and their relevance to biblical studies. Through my work with New Wine, I was given the opportunity to serve as editor on "Prophetic Lament" by Soong-Chan Rah, which also contributed to my development and application for Ph.D. studies. During the Ph.D. interview process, I was asked about my involvement with New Wine on issues such as interfaith dialogue and advocacy for the poor. In all, it is the overall development process, both academic and spiritual, which has prepared me to move on to study and teach at the highest level.

What are the highlights of MU’s Hebrew program?

We, the MU Hebrew family, do life together. We bond through learning the Hebrew Scriptures. We learn and pray together. This probably wouldn't happen at a larger university. The classroom size allows Dr. Becky Josberger and Dr. Karl Kutz to really invest in our lives and foster community.

Dr. Kutz, with the help of Dr. Josberger, has put together a method for teaching biblical Hebrew that is unlike anything else. They teach Hebrew in a way that brings the language to life and allows it to stick without memorizing hundreds of rules and charts.

What are you hoping to do with your Ph.D.?

My emphasis will be on social ethics in the Hebrew Prophets. My research proposal is to look at Micah through the lens of the social sciences and literary analysis to show how Micah can in part be recognized as social theory. In Micah, God condemns an wicked society that fosters poverty and oppression of all sorts. In contrast, Micah envisions a future world ruled by God in which nations live together in community without war and oppression.

While my Ph.D. work will focus on the book of Micah in its ancient context, my life's goal is to research, teach, and write on how the biblical prophets can serve to shape the life of the Church and the Church's engagement of culture in ever changing contexts.

Want to read more student stories? Check out our student stories page!

What I learned at the Global Missions Conference: A student’s perspective

No Comments » Written on February 28th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Students, Theology

Global studies major and Marketing Assistant Meghan Krause shares her perspective on this year’s Global Missions Conference. 

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Dr. Karen Fancher speaks at MU's 77th annual Global Missions Conference.

This past week, Multnomah hosted the 77th annual Global Ministries Conference, or GMC. The GMC’s slogan for this year was, “Cultivating Renewal: Back to the Beginning.” A team of five students, led by Dr. Greg Burch, brought this whole conference together. These five students were Jamilyn Cummings, Moriah Paterson, Kara Swanson, Annica Davis and Jared Stone. From the decorations, to the advertisements, to the selection of speakers and guests, these five students confronted all of us about creation care and the part we play in this topic.

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From left to right: Moriah Paterson, Jared Stone, Jamilyn Cummings, Annica Davis, McKenzie Chapman and Kara Swanson.

GMC2One of the students from this team was senior Jared Stone, the GMC’s logistics coordinator, whom I caught up with as everything concluded. “The GMC went better than I even expected — from the coordination of decorations, to the responses the skits received, to the talk I have overheard from fellow students about the workshops,” he said. “It was great to bring the topic of creation care to the table for us as Christian students.” His statement appears to speak for itself from my observations.

As a student, I attended every plenary session that featured the keynote speakers, Dr. Miriam Adeney and Dr. A.J. Swoboda. With conviction, these two speakers connected Christianity and creation care on theological and practical bases. I attended a decent amount of the workshops as well. From these workshops, a few things definitively stuck with me. For example, La Montana exemplified how ministry and creation care can be quite interconnected. Dr. A.J Swoboda showed the significance and rejuvenation that keeping the Sabbath can have in all areas of life.

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Another thing that I observed during these workshops was fellow students pursuing knowledge and connections that would guide them in their journey of creation care. Questions like, “What can I do as an individual?” were thrown around, and answers were given that ranged from education and advocacy to living a simpler life. I myself, and many others, also enjoyed networking and learning from the many missions organizations that came to this year’s GMC. Meeting with individuals representing different organizations gave the GMC a personal touch, as students could find specific ministries that called to them.

GMC3A final aspect of this conference that students seemed to enjoy was the worship, led by Caleb Schmidt from Youth With A Mission. Every day I saw different students having intent conversations with Schmidt. So, I decided to ask about his experience at the GMC. “The best part has been seeing students encounter God and the concept of living present-centered lives,” he said. “The hospitality here has been amazing, and I love the heart for missions I have seen.”

Whether it was the plenary sessions, the call to creation care, or individual connections, the 77th GMC had something to offer to each member of the Multnomah community.

MU celebrates grand opening of new study space

Comments Off on MU celebrates grand opening of new study space Written on February 20th, 2017 by
Categories: Students

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This afternoon, students, staff and faculty gathered to celebrate the grand opening of The Study, a new space for students who want to focus on homework. An extension of the Student Success Center, The Study is located in the southwest corner of the JCA. It takes the place of the former Commuter Center Lounge, which has since relocated to The Den.

“I’m so glad you’ve all made yourselves at home,” said Dean of Student Kim Stave to the group before her. “We’re so excited to open up this space. Our hope is that The Study will become a bustling center of academic effort and success. It’s been exciting to see this come to life!”

The Study offers computers and a printer, as well as several cozy areas designed for individual or group study. Food is permitted, and the space is available during the same hours as the JCA Student Center, which is typically open from 6:30 a.m. to 1 a.m.

The new space will be overseen by Christy Martin, assistant director for housing & academic support. And while The Study will usually be unstaffed, Martin announced there will be weekly study hall sessions when students can drop in without an appointment to meet with a staff member or tutor.

“We can provide more opportunities for students to maximize their learning,” says Martin. “We want this to be a place where people can learn from one another, connect with staff, and just drop in and get some homework done.”

Elementary Education major Sarah Carrier already plans on making The Study a regular haunt. “I think it’s a really beneficial and needed space,” she says. It’s homey and conducive for studying. I think students will really benefit from it.”

Study hall times

Tuesdays
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Staff member: Christy Martin

Wednesdays
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Student tutor

Thursdays
6 to 8 p.m.
Student tutor

If you have any questions about The Study, contact Christy Martin at cmartin@multnomah.edu.

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Global Ministries Conference to make creation care a priority

Comments Off on Global Ministries Conference to make creation care a priority Written on February 8th, 2017 by
Categories: Events, Students, Theology

PORTLAND, Ore. — From February 21 to 23, Multnomah University will host the 77th annual Global Ministries Conference (GMC) on campus. The title of this year’s conference is “Cultivating Renewal: Back to the Beginning.” The seminars, plenary talks and activities will revolve around creation care in its many aspects. Read the rest of this entry »

MA in Global Development and Justice students travel to Rwanda

Comments Off on MA in Global Development and Justice students travel to Rwanda Written on February 6th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Programs, Students

Dr. Greg Burch, chair of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program, recently returned from a two-week stay in Rwanda with the MAGDJ program's very first online cohort. Students in the online MAGDJ program spend the first two weeks of their program in Rwanda, where they glean insights from guest speakers, study the world’s most pressing issues and team up with NGOs that are involved in compassion initiatives, poverty alleviation and combating injustice. You can learn more about the online MAGDJ program here

Learning on the Road in Rwanda

by Dr. Greg Burch

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

On January 3, Multnomah inaugurated its new blended online development and justice (MAGDJ) program in Rwanda. Students coming from California, Colorado, Oregon, Kenya and Rwanda joined together for a two-week experiential learning course that included a focus on learning from development organizations throughout the country. Learning from social entrepreneurs, community-based child care workers, refugees, and micro-finance and savings clubs participants proved significant for students working in the fields of international development and global justice.

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Memorial site in Kigali, Rwanda's capital city, where more than 250,000 victims of the 1994 genocide are buried. All in all, the 1994 genocide left nearly 1 million people dead.

One primary focus of the trip was learning from a country that suffered a genocide in 1994. Rwanda has faced significant suffering and also profound transformation since that time. Genocide memorials, including a visit with a perpetrator and a victim helped the students understand the profound nature of forgiveness and reconciliation. In meeting with Emmanuel (a genocide perpetrator) and his victim, Alice, who survived a machete and spear attack from Emmanuel and the loss of her baby, met with us to describe their healing process and what Christ has done in their lives to bring them into a close relationship today. The conversation was truly stunning. We learned forgiveness and reconciliation is possible even with the most heinous of crimes.

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Visits also included time with a number of non-government organizations and ministries, including Africa New Life Ministries, Tearfund, World Relief, These Numbers Have Faces, Prison Fellowship, International Teams, Word Made Flesh, and Arise Rwanda. The course led us through the importance of a solid biblical understanding for engaging in transformational development and biblical justice with an emphasis on peace and reconciliation, micro-finance and job creation, savings clubs, refugee resettlement, and education in poverty contexts, just to mention a few.

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Learning about World Relief with country director Moses Ndahiro.

There are a number of standout experiences from our time in Rwanda, but Alice and Ariana demonstrated a powerful example in their entrepreneurial efforts as electrical engineering students in designing and preparing to manufacture solar lamps that will provide light for children studying at night in refugee camps in the country. What was so capturing was that they themselves come from refugee backgrounds and struggled to read at night with candles.

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Learning from social entrepreneurs Alice and Ariana, and from the program These Numbers have Faces.

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Beans – a staple in a country where malnutrition continues to plague many communities, despite valiant efforts.

Another significant event was our time in a refugee camp. Eighteen thousand people, primarily Congolese people who have been forced out by insecurity and conflict, live just across the border in Rwanda in a cramped camp managed by the UNHCR. Our primary focus in the camp was on access to education by the 9,000 children and youth in the camp. Much of our time was spent with students, the very few, that have access to school through sponsorship programs. Spending time with refugees and hearing their stories was moving. Stories that involved faith, hope and patience as they await placement in countries around the world, with many having to wait eighteen or even twenty years as governments decide on permanent location.

These MAGDJ students will spend the next 18 months in online courses and internships reflecting on these and other field experiences as they take classes on micro-finance, refugees, nonprofit leadership, human rights and the like. For more information on our online Global Development and Justice program, go here.

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Participating in a savings and loan club in rural Rwanda with Arise Rwanda.

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Clean water in Boneza – Arise Rwanda has dug 12 wells for the community of 24,000 people.

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Clean water projects are critical to reduce water-borne diseases.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.

MU celebrates fall graduation

Comments Off on MU celebrates fall graduation Written on December 19th, 2016 by
Categories: Press Releases, Students

Last Monday, 73 Multnomah students gathered with friends and family members at Central Bible Church to celebrate graduation. As each student walked across the stage, they shook hands with University President Craig Williford and received their diplomas.

Below are some pictures taken from that night. Well done, graduates! We are very proud of you all.

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MU celebrates grand opening for Veterans Resource Center

Comments Off on MU celebrates grand opening for Veterans Resource Center Written on November 21st, 2016 by
Categories: Press Releases, Students

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If you walked through the JCA Student Center on Veterans Day, you would have seen tables decorated in red, white and blue with food and drink on top. A watermelon carved to resemble a bald eagle was the centerpiece of this patriotic display. A podium, surrounded by chairs, stood in front of an American flag. This small area was set up to celebrate the grand opening of The Multnomah University Veterans Resource Center.

The resource center, located in the JCA’s West Lobby, will be a safe place for veterans in the Multnomah community to receive support from their peers. Veterans can shop at the center’s food pantry, browse pamphlets for off-campus resources, and connect with plenty of friendly veterans. The resource center will be open weeknights, and the food pantry will be open Saturdays.

Multnomah’s community of veterans will be working hard to create a place where the brotherhood and sisterhood of military service can support one another in a place of understanding. The center will be completely run by student volunteers, with oversight provided by Veterans Faculty Advisor Dr. Michael Gurney.

At the grand opening, retired Air Force Col. and MU Board of Trustees Member Brent Mesquit spoke to Multnomah’s veterans on behalf of the university. “Thank you for your sacrificial service to our great nation,” he said. “It is held in high regard at Multnomah University.” After  Mesquit’s acknowledgments, the student veteran who started it all was given the chance to speak.

Psychology major Matthew Comprix used to run the resource center out of his on-campus apartment. He’s elated to have a new space where he can continue serving his fellow veterans. “Every one of us gave of ourselves, with the possibility of giving all of ourselves, for the greater good of our great nation,” he said. “Student veterans need an outlet for their servant hearts. To serve other veterans and the community they’re in is a great outlet for them.”

 

The resource center needs volunteers!

If you’re interested in volunteering at the Veterans Resource Center, contact Matthew Comprix at mcomprix@my.multnomah.edu. You do not need to be a veteran to volunteer.

If you are interested in earning Service Learning credit through volunteering at the resource center, contact Dr. Roger Trautmann at rtrautmann@multnomah.edu.

Pastoral Ministry major to be renamed Church Leadership

Comments Off on Pastoral Ministry major to be renamed Church Leadership Written on November 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Students

Multnomah University is changing the name of the pastoral ministry major to church leadership. The revision will take effect at the start of the 2017 spring semester. “In many ways, the two titles are synonymous,” says Practical Theology Division Chair Dr. Hildebrand. “The heart of the program will remain the same, and the training will largely remain the same.”

The switch was initiated by Pastoral Ministry Chair Dr. Jay Held, who says the program’s title has been a hindrance to students who want to lead in the church, but not as pastors. “While the word ‘pastoral’ accurately describes some of the primary roles of leadership within the church, it does not describe all of them,” says Hildebrand. “Our hope is that we can reach more potential Christian leaders now. We’re attempting to remove a barrier.” The church leadership program will continue providing excellent preparation for students who want to become pastors.

The proposal for the name change went through many years of consideration before being approved this year. The pastoral ministry major has been a staple at Multnomah since 1994, and was offered as a minor before that. “Christian ministry training has been close to the heart of Multnomah since our inception,” says Hildebrand. “We have been pleased to prepare thousands of missionaries, pastors, youth leaders, and other Christian workers for service in the Kingdom of God.” After more than 20 years of educating church leaders, the church leadership program will seek to equip even more students under an inclusive title.

If you have any questions about this decision, please contact Youth Ministry Chair Dr. Rob Hildebrand, Pastoral Ministry Chair Dr. Jay Held, or Seminary Dean Dr. Derek Chinn.

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