Students

Multnomah students make dorm life their business

No Comments » Written on May 19th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Feature, Programs, Students

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Marketing professor Michael Hohn doesn’t like fake case studies. He prefers bringing the curriculum to life by instigating legitimate projects with real impact. That’s exactly what his Sales and Marketing class did last semester.

Director of Student Life Kim Stave “hired” Hohn’s class to help her department answer an important question: How can Multnomah University increase occupancy in the dorms? The business majors divided into three teams to create a value proposition, conduct research, gather data and analyze their findings. This allowed them to offer evidence-based recommendations to their client.

“As we worked on the project, it was awesome to see how we were immediately able to apply what we were learning in class,” says business student Valerie Wakefield.

Her classmate Robbie Miller concurs. “Our business classes taught us that we’d need extensive and thorough research to do a good job on this project.”

The amount of data they gathered even kept Hohn on his toes. “It was the most memorable of any projects that I can remember!” he says.

After administering a competitive analysis, Miller and his team came up with a few proposals to make dorm life more attractive, such as planning more student events on campus and adding a new communal student area. “A long-term goal is to create a space for students to gather other than the JCA,” Miller explains. “It’d be a space where people would walk to and not walk through.”

At the culmination of their work, the students presented their findings to the judges, a group of faculty and staff members, including Business Department Chair Lee Sellers and Multnomah University President Craig Williford. The teams were judged on the depth and scope of their research as well as the quality of their recommendations. The group with the winning proposal was awarded dinner at Portland City Grill with Sellers, Williford and Stave.

Although the students are young in their careers, Stave and her department found their work extremely helpful. “Our students are intelligent and creative, and they came up with some ideas that we will certainly consider implementing,” says Stave. “The fact that all three groups, each approaching the project from a different angle, came to some of the same conclusions was significant to me.”

The students feel confident that the experience afforded them important skills for their future jobs. “This project was good practice on how to communicate well with group members and stay on the same page,” says Miller.

Wakefield agrees. “I was able to practice skills that are useful in most any profession,” she says. “I’ve even applied some things we learned in my everyday interactions!”

Spring graduates reflect on time well spent

No Comments » Written on May 9th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Press Releases, Students

Last Friday, 115 Multnomah students walked across the stage of Rolling Hills Community Church to receive their diplomas. Among them were Abigail Buckley, Brian Hall, Mandee Campos, Dae Kim, Nancy Anderson and Santino Cantalupo, six students who picked up much more than a quality education at MU. They took some time to reflect on what they’ve learned, how they’ve changed and where they plan to go next.

Abigail Buckley

Abigail BuckleyHometown
Vancouver, Wash.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a minor in History

Favorite MU experience
Probably being a student worker. It made me feel more informed about the school. I started in Financial Aid, then worked as Dr. Scalberg’s teacher’s assistant, and then I worked in Advancement. They all took care of me and understood that my homework came first. It was really fun – I loved my time as a student worker.

Favorite class
Oh, but there are so many! Prophets with Dr. Josberger and History and Poetry with Dr. Koivisto were both great, and so was History and Christianity with Dr. Scalberg. In History and Christianity, we saw how different movements and authors affected the shape of evangelicalism. We traced back our own influences. It shows you where you come from, and you learn how denominations and people groups brought you together.

Favorite thing about MU
The relationships the professors build with their students. I feel pretty confident saying every student has one teacher they can look back on – someone who cared for them personally. I’m not going to necessarily remember the classes, but I’m going to remember who taught the classes.

Favorite thing about Portland
It’s central to so many places. If you want to go to the beach or the mountains for the day, you can do that. Whatever you like to do, you can find it.

Plans after graduation
I’m going to keep on teaching. (She currently teaches Spanish 1-3 to high school students at Cedar Tree Classical Christian School in Ridgefield, Wash.) I’m so grateful for the opportunity.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I took Senior Theology this semester with Dr. Gurney. You have to write eight doctrinal statements. It was daunting at first and rather intimidating. Not only do you have to write on what you believe, but you also have to find the scripture to back it up. For that reason alone, MU taught me not to shy away from issues. The professors are willing to bring up issues and foster an environment where it’s safe to talk about them.

Advice to your first-year self
I didn’t do as many on-campus and off-campus activities because I was a commuter and worked in the evening. Your experience here is what you make it. I wish I had taken advantage of getting to know more of the people here. You have a short amount of time, and it goes fast.

Brian Hall

Brian HallHometown
Yucca Valley, Calif.

Program
Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Theology with a second major in Youth Ministry

Favorite MU experience
Learning how to do ministry with my wife. We met during our freshman year and got married that first summer. The education that I received from MU was great, but the experience of being able to do ministry as newlyweds with the Hildebrands as role models has been invaluable.

Favorite class
Out of all the classes I’ve taken at MU, there are two that have stood out: Spiritual Formation of Youth with Dr. Rob Hildebrand and Mission with Children at Risk with Dr. Greg Burch.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love living in the city! I come from a town where the fanciest restaurant is Applebee’s and the only things to do are walk around Walmart or go to the four-screen movie theater. I love having the city at my fingertips! The food is great here, and there are always things to do!

Favorite thing about MU
The youth ministry program. In-class education is really only a small part of the degree. The opportunities that Rob provides to go to Germany or Japan, or to work on Spring Thaw, is what really makes this education so unique and practical.

Plans after graduation
I am planning on pursuing my Master of Arts in Christian Leadership with an emphasis in Counseling and Care at Multnomah Biblical Seminary.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
Before coming to MU, my knowledge of the Bible was limited to the classic Bible stories like Adam and Eve, David and Goliath, Jesus, etc. It seemed like a series of random stories were just thrown into one bigger book. The Bible classes here have taught me that the Bible is one whole story. This has impacted my spiritual journey by opening my eyes to the plan that God does have for my life. I may feel like I’m wandering in the desert, but I know that there’s a promise for me up ahead.

Advice to your first-year self
Take advantage of your time at Multnomah. Don’t just be here for the degree. Your teachers have so much to offer you outside of the classroom setting, but they’ll only be able to offer it to you if you start the conversation. Hone your strengths while you’re here too. Again, don’t just be here for the degree. A piece of paper isn’t going to teach you to study the Bible, prepare a sermon or build a life-sized Mario Kart track.

Mandee Campos

Mandee CamposHometown
Beaverton, Ore. (I’ve lived in a lot of places, but Beaverton is probably my favorite.)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Best MU experience
I liked being in a cohort and sharing experiences with them. It’s neat to share in the journey. I enjoyed the Bible prerequisites – there were many mind-blowing moments.

Favorite class
I struggle to pick a favorite class, so I’ll go with most impactful: Theology of Cultural Engagement with Dr. Metzger. It was a good foundation to begin working from a Trinitarian perspective.

Favorite thing about MU
With all the seminary professors and theology professors you have, I really like that everyone isn’t saying the same thing – they each say things that put tension on what the others have said. I think that’s a good thing because you get to see different perspectives.

Favorite thing about Portland
The food. You can get almost any type of food. I love Chinese and Indian and Thai. Food is the best way to understand and relate to one another.

Plans after graduation
I’m working with a nonprofit called Lahash International that partners with grassroots initiatives in East Africa. I’ll be working as the Servant Teams Coordinator.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This program especially has taught me to listen well to people, to affirm their dignity. When you’re in fellowship with people, you’ll learn a lot about faith and about God that you wouldn’t otherwise. If you want to see Jesus, be in relation with people outside of your context. That’s how he did it in scripture.

Advice to your first-year self
Always seek to learn from a given situation. Some people take for granted a privilege they’ve been given. Much of the world wasn’t given the opportunities we’ve been given. Believers are called to seek excellence, so be willing to learn and learn well.

Dae Kim

Dae KimHometown
Northern Virginia (I moved around a lot)

Program
Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice

Favorite MU experience
We had an event last semester every Thursday where we’d take turns sharing our testimony. Sharing my testimony and listening to others throughout the semester was a great experience. We’d pray for one another.

Favorite class
Hmmm. Last year, I took Conflict, Refugees and Complex Disasters with Dr. Karen Fancher. My heart is for the Middle East. She talked a lot about Syrian and Sudanese refugees. I’m not necessarily critical of what I hear, but after this class, I learned to become more critical, and I researched more on certain topics. What the media shares doesn’t give us the whole picture. Whatever they say is pretty biased, so I want to hear different angles. This was a big takeaway.

Favorite thing about MU
I was impressed that professors connect issues with Jesus Christ. Sometimes people think Christians just praise God on Sundays. But here, professors connect the Bible with every subject, and they ask what it means to follow Jesus in this messy world. It’s a unique thing MU has to offer.

Plans after graduation
First of all, I’m going to China on May 31 for one month– I’ve already bought the ticket. I really have a heart for the Middle East, so I’ll also be connecting with organizations in Lebanon. Right now I’m talking to an organization in Egypt about an internship in August. I’m also working on joining the Peace Corps; if that works out, I’ll be in Albania for two years too.

How has MU impacted your spiritual journey
I’ve met many spiritual mentors here. People I’ve gotten to know through my professors, my friends, my cohort. They’re always praying for me. Nothing in my future is for sure, but I trust God. There were times I was struggling with theological issues. But since my time at MU, I’ve learned fellowship is really important.

Nancy Anderson

Nancy AndersonHometown
Portland, Ore.

Program
Master of Divinity, Chaplaincy Track

Favorite MU experience
Interacting with fellow students in an academic and spiritual journey. Most students were an average of 30 years younger than me, but they welcomed me into their lives and were so encouraging and friendly.

Favorite class
Are you kidding? I loved every single one, although some were more challenging than others. The Spiritual Warfare class with Dr. Calvin Blom was a standout for the excellent combination of theology and practical application. But honestly, each class was unique and special. Dr. Stephen Kim’s Bible Survey classes were awesome, and Dr. Baylis and Dr. Metzger are brilliant instructors.

Favorite thing about MU
I love the way that professors allowed us to tailor the learning experience to our personal ministry situations. I was often allowed to adapt assignments to my world of working with the elderly in assisted living, which made the learning experience more meaningful.

Favorite thing about Portland
I love that we have both the ocean experience and mountains available for vacations and exploration. God has blessed my husband and me with 45 years living here as a married couple.

Plans after graduation
Focus on better message preparation for Sunday worship as I continue my ministry as a chaplain in an assisted living community – Hearthstone of Beaverton. I came to Multnomah to become a better-equipped chaplain.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
This was the time of learning that I needed to launch myself into a deeper walk with the Lord. I have always loved the Lord, but my faith has been strengthened and deepened by being at Multnomah. I have a far better understanding of the Word of God too.

Advice to your first-year self
Relax and trust God to give you all you need. Yes, do your part and pay attention in class, take good notes, do homework on time, work ahead on the big projects, and then trust God to make your brain work!

Santino Cantalupo

Santino CantalupoHometown
Reno, Nev.

Program
Master of Divinity

Favorite MU experience
Coming up for a summer intensive and getting out of a class early and climbing to the top of Multnomah Falls at the suggestion of my professor. It was a beautiful hike and allowed me to connect with God’s creation.

Favorite class
Preaching Narrative Literature

Favorite thing about MU
I love the opportunity that MU has given to distance students, especially to the growing student base in Reno, Nev.

Plans after graduation
I feel called to lead a church as a senior pastor, and I’m pursuing my Doctor of Ministry degree at Duke.

How MU impacted your spiritual journey
I have grown more spiritually during my time in seminary than any other time in my life. This journey has been strenuous and at times filled with suffering and loss, but often it was a conversation with a professor or a student that allowed me to refocus my eyes on Christ.

Advice to your first-year self
Never take a theology class and a Bible class at the same time. Ever.

Students partner with local nonprofit providing free clothes for foster kids

No Comments » Written on May 5th, 2016 by
Categories: Students

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Rhonda Meadows is beaming as she welcomes six Multnomah students to her cheery storefront inside the Lloyd Center Mall. Once the group gathers in a semi-circle, the HR Management class from MU’s business program presents her with two handbooks. Meadows thumbs through the pages as the students explain their work. She likes what she sees. “I just want to applaud you,” she says, looking around at each business major. “You guys did such an amazing job. This really helps us.”

Meadows is the founder of Project Lemonade, a nonprofit providing free back-to-school clothes and shoes for local foster kids. “It really has to do with the saying, ‘If life gives you lemons, make lemonade,’” she says. “That’s what we do in this store every day.” Since 2012, the organization has served over 6,300 foster youth from 16 counties.

IMG_3818Louis Idlett, Lindsey Weaver, Sadie Jenks, Preston Brooks, Michael Kamlade and Tyler Bickley are the interns supporting this mission. Over the past semester, they have collaborated with Project Lemonade to create volunteer and intern handbooks for the 300 people who keep the nonprofit running. The students’ diligence, flexibility and continual communication made them successful in compiling information about dress codes, store policies and conduct for future interns and volunteers.

What with the staff’s crammed schedules and limited resources, the students’ involvement offered Project Lemonade some much-needed relief.  “We’ve tried to partner with other schools before, and it hasn’t been as beneficial,” says Meadows. “We didn’t put forth as much time with this group – they did a lot on their own. They really stretched our vision.”

The pairing proved to be a winning combo. The business majors were able to help the busy nonprofit all while gaining priceless experience for their future careers. Brooks attributed much of the project’s success to the training his group received in previous classes. “The business program prepared (us) by giving us a lot of team projects in the past,” says the senior. “We were able to really work well as a team on this project.”

In the midst of it all, Professor Ted Takamura encourages his students to represent Christ in every interaction. Servant leadership is a constant theme he emphasizes. “Compassion comes from Christ,” he says. “We want (our students) to be different. I ask them to be points of light.”

The opportunity for goodwill was particularly exciting to Brooks. “Being able to meet the people we were working with, see the store and make this project something that would really help them and help these foster kids was a highlight,” he says. “It had a lasting effect.”

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Conference teaches church leaders how to respect, engage with science

No Comments » Written on April 28th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Seminary, Students

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Many see faith and science like oil and water — they’re impossible to integrate. But New Wine, New Wineskins thinks differently. On April 16 and 23, the institute hosted a conference aimed at dispelling the segregation of these communities through thoughtful dialogue. The conference, Church and Science: Partners for the Common Good, was made possible by a grant Multnomah Biblical Seminary received from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in an effort to integrate science into the seminary curriculum (view the 10 seminary courses that have adopted this integration here).

“It’s bound up with our ongoing, strategic effort at Multnomah to prepare seminary graduates in their pastoral calling to constructively engage our scientific age,” says Paul Louis Metzger, director of New Wine, New Wineskins. “It’s for the sake of their parishioners who have scientific questions and scientific vocational interests, and for the church’s own missional engagement with the surrounding culture.”

The event brought in speakers from Portland and across the country to explore several themes, including the history of faith and science, hermeneutical humility, and faith and scientific methods. Attendants delved into the themes through a variety of formats, such as plenary sessions, panels, workshops and thoughtful discussion times.

“Many young Christians are leaving churches because of what they perceive to be antagonism by the church toward science,” says Metzger. “It’s vitally important that pastors in training are equipped to develop an informed respect for science and discernment on how to articulate biblical faith in our scientific age.”

Many attendees walked away feeling more prepared and aware. “As a pastor, this conference opened my eyes to the tremendous need we have to address the role of science in our faith communities,” says Gaby Viesca, pastor to women at Cedar Mill Bible Church. “It also equipped me with practical tools to help people navigate their own questions and doubts, and how to engage in meaningful conversations around this topic.”

Jared Bennett, associate pastor at Grace Community Church called the conference “phenomenal” and found Dr. John Walton’s session especially insightful. “He stressed that the debate over young earth creationism/evolution is not what we should be focused on; the mechanics of ‘how’ are secondary to the agency of ‘who.’” Bennett claims to have walked away with a lot to think about. “I will continue to read, think and pray on what I learned at the conference in the hope that I can use that personal growth to better pastor my students,” he says.

Join the ongoing discussion. New Wine is hosting forums at local churches, and you can check out their website for information and updates. You can also read endorsements for the Church and Science conference here. Lastly, if you’re a youth pastor, New Wine wants to collaborate with you in order to care for teens wrestling with their faith in the midst of scientific questions. Stay tuned.

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‘A sense of adventure’: Tirzah Allen satisfies her love of travel in the MATESOL program

Comments Off Written on April 18th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

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Tirzah Allen has the traveling bug. Immediately after high school she packed her bags and headed to Scotland for a year-long adventure. She worked odd jobs, met people from all different backgrounds and explored the country. “That time planted the seeds of travel in my life,” says Allen, who’s enrolled in the Master of Arts in TESOL program. And it wasn’t long before those seeds started to germinate.

After graduating with a BA in English and communication, Allen began researching grad schools. “I had no idea that MU offered grad programs, but I happened to stumble upon it,” she says. “I chose TESOL because I wanted the ability to open more doors and be challenged continuously. I don’t want to be too comfortable, and I want to keep extending myself. This requires a built-in sense of adventure.”

TIRZAH_ClassThat sense of adventure is being satisfied during her studies at Multnomah. Not only does she have enriching classroom time, but she also teaches weekly, on-campus ESL classes. “This is the full program, plus the tools to succeed,” she says. “I’ve had the opportunity to meet with people from Burma, Vietnam, Cuba and beyond.”

Whether she’s preparing coffee for her customers in Roger’s Café, or bantering with her Cuban students over homework, Allen strives to reflect Jesus in every interaction. “Finding a Christian in a public setting is like finding an agate on the beach,” she says. “There is something that sparkles. I can’t always out rightly incorporate the gospel in every environment, but I can always show others what I believe.”

Allen is also enjoying each of her professors. “These are teachers who really care,” she says. “It emanates from them, and they go above and beyond what is required. Their servants’ hearts are evident. I’m learning that a teacher’s journey is one of servitude. I want to inspire my students to aspire to be more.”

Allen doesn’t know where the seeds of travel will take root. But she does know she has an open heart for wherever God leads her. “I’d love to teach overseas,” she says. “Anywhere, anytime, any way. Wherever God sends I will go. I’m taking my life one step at a time.”

Local nonprofit creates unique internship opportunities for business students

Comments Off Written on April 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Students

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Business Department Chair Lee Sellers is passionate about integrating practical experience into his students’ education. So when Andrew Stone at Kingdom Ministries needed interns to help support his young nonprofit, an on-going partnership was created.

“It seemed like a good opportunity to give young people real world experience while helping the organization grow more efficiently,” says Stone, who started the Portland nonprofit with his father, Multnomah alumnus Kevin Stone. Joined by their families, the father-son team equips ministries in Italy by connecting them to volunteers who serve in their summer camps, English classes and city festivals.

Mike Kamlade, Lindsey Weaver, Miranda Schmillen, Grant Warner and Lucia Morud are the interns supporting this mission. Over the course of the school year, the five business majors have diligently worked in finance, marketing and project management roles to promote, arrange and fund this year’s summer camps. They’ll see the culmination of their work in June when they travel with other Kingdom Ministries volunteers to Italy.

Although they’ve encountered a number of hurdles throughout the planning process, the interns say the hiccups are undeniably constructive. “It's teaching me to adapt to my surroundings and be open to learning new things,” says finance intern Mike Kamlade.

Project management intern Lindsey Weaver had to adapt too. “Once you get out of the classroom and deal with people in real life, it changes things,” she says.“I looked for this kind of opportunity in high school, but nothing ever came up.” Weaver’s duties include liaising with contacts, coordinating schedules and planning trip logistics.

Miranda Schmillen, who’s responsible for tracking donations and budgeting, admits the internship would be much harder if she was unequipped. But luckily she has a semester of accounting under her belt. “My accounting class totally helped me,” says the finance intern.

Stone’s instruction has only built upon students’ knowledge, and his attentiveness has inspired them to do their best. “He’s super ambitious and has these huge ideas, but he’s also hands-on and shows you how to do things,” says Schmillen.

Stone has simply created an optimal space for trial, error and learning.“They’re getting experience they won’t get anywhere else,” he says. “It’s a very safe environment to learn in.”

It may have been safe, but it wasn’t easy. The interns have bonded through shared struggles and successions — and they’ve emerged stronger than ever. “This internship has blessed me more than I expected because of the relationships I've built with the other interns and the Stone family,” says Kamlade. “They are all great people.”

For more information about this internship and Kingdom Ministries, visit BuildingTheKingdom.org.

Mixing Bible with career: business owner joins degree completion program

Comments Off Written on April 7th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

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Curt Heitschmidt worked in construction for more than 20 years. His cabinet business was successful, and he was enjoying life with his wife and three kids.

But he was ready for something different.

“I decided to drop everything and finish my degree because I wanted to learn more about business after owning one for so long,” Heitschmidt says. “I knew that I could study business anywhere, but the business and Bible combination was what I really wanted.”

Multnomah stood out as his best option. He applied to the management & ethics program (which recently changed its name to the business management program) in MU’s Degree Completion Program. Heitschmidt was accepted, and he entered the program with anticipation.

Studying business and the Bible with his classmates has not been disappointing. They even make things more fun by bringing food each week to share with each other. “My cohort experience has been a good mix,” he says. “It’s great to come together around a meal and support each other.”

Going back to school is always challenging, and Heitschmidt’s journey is no different. “Chaos is a constant theme in my life right now,” he says. “My family and I have just moved, my wife works nights, and I’m enrolled full-time in the degree completion program.” But he has no regrets. He even insists his homework load has been manageable alongside his other duties.

Heitschmidt says he’ll probably return to construction after he graduates. But he’ll reenter the field with a revived understanding of what it means to combine Bible with career.

“I’m learning that the Bible isn’t just a handbook,” he says. “It never specifically tells you what to do in each situation. You have to figure out how to bring its principles into the work environment.” Multnomah is equipping him with the tools to do just that.

Spring Thaw unites, inspires local youth groups

Comments Off Written on April 5th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Students

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Spring Thaw kicked off last weekend, and attendees filled MU’s campus with the contagious energy only 650 high school students could bring. From Friday evening to Sunday afternoon, the weekend was packed with activities, including a comedy show, paintball, a game truck, sports tournaments and a photo booth.

For the past six years, Multnomah has been hosting a weekend-long retreat for local high school youth groups. The theme changes from year to year, but there’s always dynamic speaking and teaching, interactive games, and limitless space for students to experience God outside their usual routine.

This year’s theme, PDXperience, brought almost every Portland stereotype onto one campus. A swarm of camping tents were pitched in the North Bradley lawn, an array of food carts circled the gym parking lot, and the main stage was propped with iconic Portland symbols like the White Stag sign. At night, Roger’s Cafe was transformed into a hipster coffee shop. A live piano filled the room with jazz while students fueled up on caffeine before competing in Nerf challenges and Library Laser Tag.

“It’s super fun; the whole thing is enjoyable,” remarked Julia, a student from Grace Point Community Church in Tigard, who said there wasn’t one thing she didn’t like.

Youth Ministry Department Chair Dr. Rob Hildebrand has been running Spring Thaw since he dreamt it up in 2010, but he decided to take a well-deserved hiatus this year. Luckily for youth groups everywhere, Director of Auxiliary Services Bobby Howell stepped in to fill Hildebrand’s shoes. A team of volunteers from the Multnomah community and Central Bible Church worked hard alongside him to produce this year’s event.

When students weren’t noshing on food cart fare or darting around the pitch-black library with plastic laser guns, they were soaking up the wisdom of A.J. Swaboda, a local pastor, professor and author who served as the event’s main speaker. Swaboda pushed the high schoolers to examine their faith more deeply by candidly explaining what following Jesus really requires. The students thought he was relatable and straightforward.

“It’s nice that A.J. is addressing what it’s like to be a Christian,” said Kaylea, a sophomore from Grace Community Church in Gresham. “He’s addressing a reality.”

Brianne, who’s also from Grace Community, agrees. “I like how honest A.J. is,” she said. “He doesn’t sugarcoat things.”

Youth ministry major Brian Hall has been involved with Spring Thaw for the past four years. Aside from garnering skills and experience vital to his field of study, he truly enjoys seeing the impact the retreat has on students. “They’re getting real life stuff from people other than their youth pastors,” he said. “And it’s a fun time for the Kingdom.”

Youth Director Michael Calquhoun from Gladstone First Baptist brings his youth group back every year for that very reason. And because they don’t stop talking about it once they’ve left. “It’s a good way to build community,” he said “We get to know each other better and share common experiences. And we fall more in love with God.”

Words like that are music to Howell’s ears. “We wanted to provide a setting with quality teaching, where any youth group from any denomination could attend and enjoy the camaraderie of being with other youth groups,” he said. “I want students to be energized to take up the cross past this event — to take it back to their everyday lives. I want them to be the light of Christ.”

Ten ways to prep for a job while you’re still at MU

Comments Off Written on April 4th, 2016 by
Categories: Students

Carley Wecks, our career coach in the Career Services Department, shares a few tips on preparing for a job while you’re still in college.

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1. Start networking with professors, friends, church contacts, business contacts, or even people you meet casually. Prepare a 30-second elevator pitch about the type of career you’re looking for. You never know what kind of opportunities the people you talk with may be connected to!

2. Not sure what career path interests you? Explore your personality, interests and spiritual gifts with the specialized tools provided by the Career Services Department. (Make an appointment with Carley Wecks for details!)

3. Sign up for Optimal Resume and receive access to MU’s electronic job board, which features part-time, full-time and internship opportunities.

4. Make good use of your Service Learning hours and internships by building your experience and networking with coworkers. (Remember: MU’s electronic job board has a list of available internships to choose from.) Talk to your academic adviser for specific suggestions.

5. Like Multnomah University Career Services on Facebook and Twitter for helpful articles, new job opportunities and career advice.

6. Schedule an informational interview with someone who’s established in the field you’re considering. Find out what their typical day is like. Ask them what do they like and don’t like about their job. They can give you invaluable feedback.

7. Practice interviewing, develop a resumé, or get tips on crafting cover letters — Optimal Resume has got you covered. (Make sure to sign up if you haven’t already!)

8. Need more direction? Sit down with Carley Wecks in the Career Services Department. Get the one-on-one coaching you need to determine your interests and plan your next steps.

9. Visit the Multnomah Career Services page for more job postings and other helpful resources.

10. Trust in God, and don’t underestimate the power of prayer. Ask the Lord for wisdom and direction as you move forward. Remember: He knows the work that suits you best!

Make an appointment with Carley Wecks by emailing careerservices@multnomah.edu or by calling 503-251-6472.

Seminary students selected third year in a row for internships at Oxford

Comments Off Written on March 30th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Programs, Seminary, Students

The polished halls of Oxford University have been steeped in centuries’ worth of scholarly culture. Their crevices contain manuscripts, statues, engravings and echoes of the past. What better place for world-renowned biblical experts and students to gather?

For the third year in a row, a handful of Multnomah seminary students has been selected to attend the Logos Conference, a two-week internship in June sponsored by the Scholars Initiative. Any students who have worked on Scholars Initiative projects are invited to apply to the workshop. Scholars from more than 60 schools in North America submit applications, but only 30 students are chosen for the trip.

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 ‘Shocked and overjoyed’

Oxford3_blogChad Woodward had his eyes on Oxford ever since his classmate Daniel Somboonsiri was selected two years ago. “It was a goal I’d set for myself,” Woodward says. “I was on the edge of my seat waiting, and when I heard I was chosen, I felt validated as a Hebrew scholar.”

Alyssa Schmidt is equally enthusiastic. “I’m really excited to be around people who are passionate about God’s word, and to have so much opportunity for learning within two short weeks,” she says.

Ruben Alvarado received his invitation two weeks later than his classmates. He thought he hadn’t made it in. When he finally heard the news, he was ecstatic. “I couldn’t sleep that night,” he says. “I was shocked and overjoyed.”

 ‘Engaging and exploring’

Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz encouraged Woodward, Alvarado and Schmidt to apply for the intership. “We really enjoy our students and are proud of them,” he says. Kutz will join his students at Oxford for three days of the conference.

The conference schedule is packed with activity. There will be excursions to Winchester Abbey and Tyndale House, evensong services at Christ Cathedral, lectures from renowned scholars, tours to the Bodlian and Parker Libraries, and discussions around pots of tea. Guests will even be lodging in an ivy-cloaked Victorian house up the lane.

“This seminar is helpful for two reasons,” Kutz says. “First, students will be able build friendships with peers in the same position. Second, they will be exposed to key scholars who have figured out what it’s like to live as a Christian in the academic world.”

Dr. Rebekah Josberger, who teaches Hebrew at Multnomah, is thrilled to see how her students will grow through this opportunity. “Learning isn’t about ‘arriving’ and knowing everything,” she says. “It’s about engaging, asking questions and exploring. This all happens at the conference.”

Needless to say, this environment of exploration will boost the future careers of attendees. “It’s continued exposure to what I love and enjoy,” Woodward says. “It will bring my studies to a different level.”

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 ‘A community of excellent teachers’

All three students are brimming with praise for the quality of Multnomah’s Hebrew program. “Our professors have created a program that’s different,” says Schmidt. “It’s not just classes, but a community of excellent teachers.”

Kutz prioritizes time with his students during the trip. While other professors wander off on their own adventures, he joins his group in a pub to discuss the highlights of the conference.

“The Hebrew community is a family,” says Woodward. “It’s not just instructive; professors take an active role in our lives and come alongside us as friends.”

Alvarado wholeheartedly concurs. “It’s been the experience of a lifetime to study under Dr. Kutz and Dr. Josberger,” he says. “They teach us the language and teach us how to live life.”

Although the two weeks are crammed with scholastics, MU students are also looking forward to sightseeing. Schmidt will be stopping by Paris on her way home. Alvarado will visit several of London’s tourist attractions like the British Museum, the Tower of London and the National Gallery.

Woodward is planning to take full advantage of the international experience. It’s his 10th wedding anniversary, and he just bought a plane ticket for his wife so they can explore England together after the conference. “It will be a good balance between work and play,” he says. Cheers to that.