Students

MU celebrates grand opening of new study space

No Comments » Written on February 20th, 2017 by
Categories: Feature, Students

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This afternoon, students, staff and faculty gathered to celebrate the grand opening of The Study, a new space for students who want to focus on homework. An extension of the Student Success Center, The Study is located in the southwest corner of the JCA. It takes the place of the former Commuter Center Lounge, which has since relocated to The Den.

“I’m so glad you’ve all made yourselves at home,” said Dean of Student Kim Stave to the group before her. “We’re so excited to open up this space. Our hope is that The Study will become a bustling center of academic effort and success. It’s been exciting to see this come to life!”

The Study offers computers and a printer, as well as several cozy areas designed for individual or group study. Food is permitted, and the space is available during the same hours as the JCA Student Center, which is typically open from 6:30 a.m. to 1 a.m.

The new space will be overseen by Christy Martin, assistant director for housing & academic support. And while The Study will usually be unstaffed, Martin announced there will be weekly study hall sessions when students can drop in without an appointment to meet with a staff member or tutor.

“We can provide more opportunities for students to maximize their learning,” says Martin. “We want this to be a place where people can learn from one another, connect with staff, and just drop in and get some homework done.”

Elementary Education major Sarah Carrier already plans on making The Study a regular haunt. “I think it’s a really beneficial and needed space,” she says. It’s homey and conducive for studying. I think students will really benefit from it.”

Study hall times

Tuesdays
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Staff member: Christy Martin

Wednesdays
11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Student tutor

Thursdays
6 to 8 p.m.
Student tutor

If you have any questions about The Study, contact Christy Martin at cmartin@multnomah.edu.

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MA in Global Development and Justice students travel to Rwanda

No Comments » Written on February 6th, 2017 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Press Releases, Programs, Students

Dr. Greg Burch, chair of the Master of Arts in Global Development and Justice program, recently returned from a two-week stay in Rwanda with the MAGDJ program's very first online cohort. Students in the online MAGDJ program spend the first two weeks of their program in Rwanda, where they glean insights from guest speakers, study the world’s most pressing issues and team up with NGOs that are involved in compassion initiatives, poverty alleviation and combating injustice. You can learn more about the online MAGDJ program here

Learning on the Road in Rwanda

by Dr. Greg Burch

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

Rwanda is a known as the land of a thousand hills.

On January 3, Multnomah inaugurated its new blended online development and justice (MAGDJ) program in Rwanda. Students coming from California, Colorado, Oregon, Kenya and Rwanda joined together for a two-week experiential learning course that included a focus on learning from development organizations throughout the country. Learning from social entrepreneurs, community-based child care workers, refugees, and micro-finance and savings clubs participants proved significant for students working in the fields of international development and global justice.

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Memorial site in Kigali, Rwanda's capital city, where more than 250,000 victims of the 1994 genocide are buried. All in all, the 1994 genocide left nearly 1 million people dead.

One primary focus of the trip was learning from a country that suffered a genocide in 1994. Rwanda has faced significant suffering and also profound transformation since that time. Genocide memorials, including a visit with a perpetrator and a victim helped the students understand the profound nature of forgiveness and reconciliation. In meeting with Emmanuel (a genocide perpetrator) and his victim, Alice, who survived a machete and spear attack from Emmanuel and the loss of her baby, met with us to describe their healing process and what Christ has done in their lives to bring their them into a close relationship today. The conversation was truly stunning. We learned forgiveness and reconciliation is possible even with the most heinous of crimes.

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Visits also included time with a number of non-government organizations and ministries, including Africa New Life Ministries, Tearfund, World Relief, These Numbers Have Faces, Prison Fellowship, International Teams, Word Made Flesh, and Arise Rwanda. The course led us through the importance of a solid biblical understanding for engaging in transformational development and biblical justice with an emphasis on peace and reconciliation, micro-finance and job creation, savings clubs, refugee resettlement, and education in poverty contexts, just to mention a few.

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Learning about World Relief with country director Moses Ndahiro.

There are a number of standout experiences from our time in Rwanda, but Alice and Ariana demonstrated a powerful example in their entrepreneurial efforts as electrical engineering students in designing and preparing to manufacture solar lamps that will provide light for children studying at night in refugee camps in the country. What was so capturing was that they themselves come from refugee backgrounds and struggled to read at night with candles.

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Learning from social entrepreneurs Alice and Ariana, and from the program These Numbers have Faces.

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Beans – a staple in a country where malnutrition continues to plague many communities, despite valiant efforts.

Another significant event was our time in a refugee camp. Eighteen thousand people, primarily Congolese people who have been forced out by insecurity and conflict, live just across the border in Rwanda in a cramped camp managed by the UNHCR. Our primary focus in the camp was on access to education by the 9,000 children and youth in the camp. Much of our time was spent with students, the very few, that have access to school through sponsorship programs. Spending time with refugees and hearing their stories was moving. Stories that involved faith, hope and patience as they await placement in countries around the world, with many having to wait eighteen or even twenty years as governments decide on permanent location.

These MAGDJ students will spend the next 18 months in online courses and internships reflecting on these and other field experiences as they take classes on micro-finance, refugees, nonprofit leadership, human rights and the like. For more information on our online Global Development and Justice program, go here.

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Participating in a savings and loan club in rural Rwanda with Arise Rwanda.

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Clean water in Boneza – Arise Rwanda has dug 12 wells for the community of 24,000 people.

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Clean water projects are critical to reduce water-borne diseases.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.

Students enjoyed a beautiful rest on Lake Kivu in the town of Kibuye.

MU celebrates fall graduation

Comments Off on MU celebrates fall graduation Written on December 19th, 2016 by
Categories: Press Releases, Students

Last Monday, 73 Multnomah students gathered with friends and family members at Central Bible Church to celebrate graduation. As each student walked across the stage, they shook hands with University President Craig Williford and received their diplomas.

Below are some pictures taken from that night. Well done, graduates! We are very proud of you all.

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MU celebrates grand opening for Veterans Resource Center

Comments Off on MU celebrates grand opening for Veterans Resource Center Written on November 21st, 2016 by
Categories: Press Releases, Students

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If you walked through the JCA Student Center on Veterans Day, you would have seen tables decorated in red, white and blue with food and drink on top. A watermelon carved to resemble a bald eagle was the centerpiece of this patriotic display. A podium, surrounded by chairs, stood in front of an American flag. This small area was set up to celebrate the grand opening of The Multnomah University Veterans Resource Center.

The resource center, located in the JCA’s West Lobby, will be a safe place for veterans in the Multnomah community to receive support from their peers. Veterans can shop at the center’s food pantry, browse pamphlets for off-campus resources, and connect with plenty of friendly veterans. The resource center will be open weeknights, and the food pantry will be open Saturdays.

Multnomah’s community of veterans will be working hard to create a place where the brotherhood and sisterhood of military service can support one another in a place of understanding. The center will be completely run by student volunteers, with oversight provided by Veterans Faculty Advisor Dr. Michael Gurney.

At the grand opening, retired Air Force Col. and MU Board of Trustees Member Brent Mesquit spoke to Multnomah’s veterans on behalf of the university. “Thank you for your sacrificial service to our great nation,” he said. “It is held in high regard at Multnomah University.” After  Mesquit’s acknowledgments, the student veteran who started it all was given the chance to speak.

Psychology major Matthew Comprix used to run the resource center out of his on-campus apartment. He’s elated to have a new space where he can continue serving his fellow veterans. “Every one of us gave of ourselves, with the possibility of giving all of ourselves, for the greater good of our great nation,” he said. “Student veterans need an outlet for their servant hearts. To serve other veterans and the community they’re in is a great outlet for them.”

 

The resource center needs volunteers!

If you’re interested in volunteering at the Veterans Resource Center, contact Matthew Comprix at mcomprix@my.multnomah.edu. You do not need to be a veteran to volunteer.

If you are interested in earning Service Learning credit through volunteering at the resource center, contact Dr. Roger Trautmann at rtrautmann@multnomah.edu.

Pastoral Ministry major to be renamed Church Leadership

Comments Off on Pastoral Ministry major to be renamed Church Leadership Written on November 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Students

Multnomah University is changing the name of the pastoral ministry major to church leadership. The revision will take effect at the start of the 2017 spring semester. “In many ways, the two titles are synonymous,” says Practical Theology Division Chair Dr. Hildebrand. “The heart of the program will remain the same, and the training will largely remain the same.”

The switch was initiated by Pastoral Ministry Chair Dr. Jay Held, who says the program’s title has been a hindrance to students who want to lead in the church, but not as pastors. “While the word ‘pastoral’ accurately describes some of the primary roles of leadership within the church, it does not describe all of them,” says Hildebrand. “Our hope is that we can reach more potential Christian leaders now. We’re attempting to remove a barrier.” The church leadership program will continue providing excellent preparation for students who want to become pastors.

The proposal for the name change went through many years of consideration before being approved this year. The pastoral ministry major has been a staple at Multnomah since 1994, and was offered as a minor before that. “Christian ministry training has been close to the heart of Multnomah since our inception,” says Hildebrand. “We have been pleased to prepare thousands of missionaries, pastors, youth leaders, and other Christian workers for service in the Kingdom of God.” After more than 20 years of educating church leaders, the church leadership program will seek to equip even more students under an inclusive title.

If you have any questions about this decision, please contact Youth Ministry Chair Dr. Rob Hildebrand, Pastoral Ministry Chair Dr. Jay Held, or Seminary Dean Dr. Derek Chinn.

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‘This program shapes my life’: Mason Lepisto reflects on the Youth Ministry major

Comments Off on ‘This program shapes my life’: Mason Lepisto reflects on the Youth Ministry major Written on November 7th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

Being a youth ministry major at MU is always unpredictable. You could be wearing a mummy costume and chasing a group of kids through a library pulsing with strobe lights. You could be smashing a laptop with a pickax in preaching class. Or you could be bouncing around in a huge inflatable bubble during chapel.

This unpredictability appeals to Mason Lepisto, who entered the program last year and hasn’t looked back since. “I’ve known I wanted to do youth ministry since my freshman year of high school,” he says. “Kids at this age are in a very vulnerable time of life. They are struggling with self-identity, what to do with their lives, friendships and spiritual decisions.”

Lepisto’s classes are preparing him to serve wisely. “It’s helpful to have Bible and youth ministry classes hand in hand,” he says. “I need a solid base so that I can build the foundation for my ministry. I love the worldviews I get in each class. The professors are great, and I haven’t had one that I haven’t grown from.”

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Mason Lepisto (far right) enjoys the close-knit community he found at MU.

Everything about MU is helping Lepisto build this foundation. “I like the smaller size, the community and the relationships,” he says. “Even though I’m a commuter, there’s a place for me too.”

Lepisto has been volunteering as an assistant youth pastor at Glenwood Community Church during his time at Multnomah. The church is where everything from class translates in hands-on expereince. “I get to take what I’m learning and apply it to my job,” he says.

The unpredictability of being a full-time youth pastor is something Lepisto is ready to plunge into right after he graduates. But in the meantime, he’s thoroughly enjoying the learning process. “This program shapes my life,” he says.

Global ministry trends and issues, part 8: Mission training in the 21st century

Comments Off on Global ministry trends and issues, part 8: Mission training in the 21st century Written on October 6th, 2016 by
Categories: Faculty, Missions, Press Releases, Programs, Students

A few years ago I was invited to consult on a mission and development project that was focused on caring for at-risk kids. As I approached the residential group home where several dozen young people were being cared for, I couldn’t help but notice the despair in the eyes of the mission volunteers and caretakers of the children. You see, the missionaries were passionate about seeing young lives transformed by the gospel. There was no doubt in their sincerity to see these lives restored, but the tools and training they had received did not match the challenges they were facing.

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Whether it be working with at-risk youth and children or church planting, cross-cultural workers need proper preparation. When our academic and training programs fail to properly prepare them for the immensely difficult task of working in a new culture, communicating with a different set of standards and training in specializations needed in the field, we prevent them from fully thriving. Fortunately, some see the need and will seek additional training, some will burnout and unfortunately others will cause harm to the very ones they seek to care for. Sadly, this was the case with the group mentioned above and they were eventually closed by the local government authorities despite our best efforts.

 

Mission education and training (on both the undergraduate and graduate level) must continue to reinvent itself in the coming years. The field of mission training, as I argued in my first blog post, must keep pace with global changes and issues. This means that mission education must also keep up and even in some cases lead the way on strategy and best-practices. Mission programs are by nature an applied discipline. Developing practical skills is critical to whatever field one aspires to work in. Jim and Judy Raymo conclude that, “Skills and training are essential for successful workers of every generation” (39). As described by Moreau, Corwin and McGee, training can take place through informal, nonformal and formal opportunities (173). While all of these areas are important for mission preparation, I deeply believe that formal academic training provides students with the best opportunity to establish themselves and prepare for a thriving ministry and career in international and local contexts.

The World Evangelical Fellowship recently identified four critical skills as essential for lessening attrition rates and providing an environment in which future cross-cultural workers will thrive. They are: Spirituality, Relational Skills, Ministry Skills and Training (Taylor xiv-xv). I would argue that both undergraduate and graduate programs related to the field of mission, international development and global studies should seek to incorporate these components.

Spiritual Formation: There is no substitution for spiritual formation. One’s spirituality must seek to develop an intimate relationship with God. This will prove critical in those moments of despair and hardship. J.D. Payne discusses the importance of “being continually filled with the Spirit of Mission (Eph. 5:18)” as part of our daily task in serving Christ in mission (165). One of the goals of formal Christian training should include, “genuine growth toward spiritual maturity” (Moreau, Corwin and McGee 173). This growth should be nurtured while the student prepares to serve cross-culturally. This takes place through the integration of spiritual discipline practices in the classroom and assignments related to this.

Interpersonal Skills: Relational skills provide an atmosphere for which team-work and friendships can develop. Academic programs in this field must focus on demonstrating humility and teachability as two key skills. These skills can be nurtured in students preparing to serve on a team (especially a multicultural team). According to Moreau, Corwin and McGee “these attitudes are built on proper self-appraisal” as we encourage mission students to reflect on their purpose and service in the kingdom (176). Teachability is a critical skill in developing global partnerships. Students should be prepared to learn from others from different cultural backgrounds. “A teachable person is one who recognizes the inherent worth and wisdom of others” (Moreau, Corwin and McGee 176). Most agree that “loud, impatient, demanding people with weak interpersonal skills often fail on the mission field and in team situations” (Raymo and Raymo 45).

Ministry Skills: These skills are another critical piece to developing and preparing future cross-cultural workers.        Learning to disciple others is critical to forming leaders who will bring transformation. Whether students are working in humanitarian contexts, business contexts, diplomacy or other areas, discipleship must be emphasized. Cultural sensitivity is also an area that must be developed inside the classroom through simulation activities and group interaction.

Another area that deserves attention is professional development. Professional skills must be viewed as part of our training. Integrating both ministry skills and professional skills not only opens up more opportunities for students of mission, but provides them with the foundation they need to succeed. One of the ways to develop these skills is by providing practical experiential opportunities.

Practical Training: When working with a multicultural team or engaging with unreached people groups one notes the critical training in cross-cultural communications and competency. This is often times referred to as Cultural Intelligence. These skills can be discussed in the classroom, but must be developed on the field. This is where experiential opportunities such as internships and practical assignments move the student from the classroom to a real-life laboratory. Guided internships provide opportunities to develop these skills. According to researchers Jim and Judy Raymo, internships are an essential tool in preparing cross-cultural workers in today’s world (50). Another viable means for ensuring an experiential learning environment is through study abroad programs. In particular, study abroad programs that incorporate first-hand interaction with the culture and social realities is most valued. These and other experiences are key for practical training.

“Equipping God’s people to accomplish the missio Dei in the twenty-first century will require more diversity and cooperation than has been known hitherto” (Elliston 232). The complexity of mission training has only increased. As Edgar Elliston rightly notes, the preparation for global mission engagement will require more diverse efforts.

Andrew Kirk calls for a listening of two voices when reading Scripture. We are to listen to the voice of God (Scripture) and the voice (cry) of the people. This process will help us to combine the “universal nature and intention of the Christian’ foundation document with the particular reality of every situation into which the message and life of Christ comes” (14). The cry in our world today has been highlighted in the issues and trends discussed in this eight-part series. The voice of God will continue to shed light on healthy global engagement with these issues and many more that we will face in the coming months and years as we seek to be salt and light in our communities and world.

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If you would like additional information on either the B.A. in Global Studies or the M.A. in Global Development and Justice degree programs, please do not hesitate to contact Dr. Greg Burch via email at gburch@multnomah.edu

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Works Cited

Elliston, Edgar. “Moving Forward from Where We Are in Missiological Education.”  In Missiological Education for the 21st Century: The Book, the Circle and the Sandals, edited by Edgar J. Elliston, Charles Van Engen and J. Dudley Woodberry. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1996.

Moreau, A. Scott, Gary Corwin and Gary B. McGee. Introducing World Missions. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic. 2015.

Payne, J.D. Pressure Points: Twelve Global Issues Shaping the Face of the Church. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson 2013.

Raymo, Jim and Judy Raymo. Millennials and Mission: A Generation Faces a Global Challenge. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library. 2014.

Taylor, William David, ed. Too Valuable to Lose: Exploring the Causes and Cures of Missionary Attrition, World Evangelical Fellowship, Globalization of Mission Series. Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library. 2007.

Hebrew professor and students to present Dead Sea Scrolls fragments and findings on Oct. 10

Comments Off on Hebrew professor and students to present Dead Sea Scrolls fragments and findings on Oct. 10 Written on September 29th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, General, Seminary, Students

PORTLAND, Ore. — Dr. Karl Kutz, a Multnomah University professor, and a number of his students will present their recently published research on several Dead Sea Scrolls fragments at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10, at Multnomah University. In addition, the Museum of the Bible from Washington, D.C. will bring the fragments themselves for an exhibit in the university’s upper library. Read the rest of this entry »

News You Can Use

Comments Off on News You Can Use Written on September 2nd, 2016 by
Categories: Financial Aid, Newsletter, Students

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Financial Aid News

  • Parent PLUS Loans Originated between July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 will accrue a reduced interest rate of 6.31% (down from 6.84% for 2015-16).
  • October 1, 2016:  The 2017-18 FAFSA becomes available (fafsa.ed.gov) using 2015 tax data.  Families are encouraged to utilize the IRS Data Retrieval Tool for accuracy.

If you have further questions about Financial Aid for your student, contact us at 503-251-5335.

Student Accounts

The Student Accounts Office is here to serve you and answer any questions you may have about paying for school.  Please contact Student Accounts at 503-251-5345 or email us at studentaccounts@multnomah.edu

Spring 2017 tuition is due December 15, 2016.

Financial aid and payment arrangements, including a payment plan, need to be in place by December 15.  A 1.5% monthly finance charge may be applied to all balances not covered by a payment plan or financial aid. Make a Payment.

24-hour account access: https://selfservice.multnomah.edu/selfservice/home.aspx
After logging in, go to the Finance Tab to see your account balance by semester, make an online payment or view statements.

Payment Plan Information

We offer a variety of payment plan options to assist you with the payment of your student account. For a small fee, a payment plan can be set up with automatic payments to manage your student account balance.

Veteran’s Education/Army Tuition Assistance Benefits

If you are utilizing one or both of these benefits, please contact the VA Representative at Multnomah by calling 503-251-5372.

Family Education Privacy Act (FERPA)

If you would like to allow others to have access to your student account information, please fill out the FERPA form: http://www.multnomah.edu/admissions/tuition-financial-aid/forms/

Connecting through the new MU App

The new MU app is available from the App Store.  Type “Multnomah University” for it to show up.  Cruise around the App to connect to Social Media, Athletics, the MU Calendar, New Wine New Wineskins, Parent Resources, Prayer, Daily Verses, a Bible and more!  Questions?  Contact the Advancement Department at advancement@multnomah.edu.

Connecting with Multnomah through AmazonSmile

Did you know that while you are purchasing items from Amazon you can also be supporting the University every time you shop… at no extra cost to you?  At smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the exact same low prices, a vast selection and a convenient shopping experience with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price back to the charity of your choice.  Multnomah University is a registered charity, so it’s easy to begin.  Visit smile.amazon.com on your desktop or mobile phone browser and simply select “Change your Charity” in “Your Account.”  Thanks for supporting your MU student!

Important Dates to Remember – No classes for students

  • October 14 and 17 – Fall Mid-semester Break
  • November 24 and 25 – Thanksgiving Break
  • December 16 – Close of Fall Term
  • January 9-13 – January Term
  • January 16 – Martin Luther King Jr. Day, No Classes
  • January 17 – Spring Term begins for traditional students

Move in date January 13th for new students and January 14th for returning students. Classes resume on Tuesday, January 17, 2017.

Important Links

Student Store: www.multnomah.edu/store

Gift Baskets for Your Student: http://multnomah.pcconline.net/index.php/service/treat-orders

MU Lions Athletic Schedules: www.gomulions.org

Helping Students Succeed

Comments Off on Helping Students Succeed Written on September 2nd, 2016 by
Categories: Newsletter, Students

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Student Success Center

Multnomah University is continuing to improve on the academic support that we offer to students by formalizing a Student Success Center – now open! We have provided free tutoring in the past, but we are now adding to that effort with academic coaching.  This can include support and training for students in the areas of time management, study skills, writing strategies, life management, ongoing accountability and more!

We aim to maximize the learning experience of all our students. We are located in the JCA Student Center and are available by walk-in and appointment. Please encourage your student to come see us at any time!

Career Services

Is your student looking for career direction?  MU’s Career Services provides career coaching from the time a student enters their first year and throughout their entire time here.  And these services continue to be available even when they become alumni!

Here are some areas Career Services can assist your student in:

  • Are they struggling with finding the best fit in a major?  Coaching in discovering who they are is strength in our department.
  • Would vocational testing tools help? Strength Finder, personality testing, Spiritual gifts, and other discovery tools are available for free at any time. Strengths Finders is included in their freshman Spiritual and Personal Formation course. More specific vocational information is contained in their course on Career Development in either their Junior or Senior year.
  • Service Learning and internships help in the area of practical experience and with recognizing transferable skills.
  • Optimal Resume, an online service, provides an electronic job board that includes information on part-time jobs while in school, as well as full-time career positions.
  • There’s a section of the Student Success Center for informal browsing through vocational information in handouts, books and notebooks full of examples of resumes, articles and other tools.
  • Help in resume writing, cover letters, mock job interviews and networking is available for any stage.

Encourage your student to stop by. A casual conversation with Carley Wecks, the Career Services Coordinator with a degree in counseling and 25 years of experience at MU, might be just the next step for your student in their personal and vocational journey.

The Career Services office is located in the Student Success Center on the first floor of the JCA.

Specific webpages can be seen at www.multnomah.edu/career.

Student Employment at MU

Parents: Be sure your student brings with them original documents they will need to secure employment.  Whether on campus or off, your student will need original, unexpired identification and work authorization documents in order to be hired for pay.

Samples of acceptable documents for completing the Federal I-9 form include:

  • US Passport, or foreign passport with work authorization
  • Social Security Card
  • Driver’s License or Identification Card
  • Certified Birth Certificate
  • US Military Identification Card
  • Military Dependent ID Card

You can also view a list of our open student employment positions here.