Students

Local nonprofit creates unique internship opportunities for business students

Comments Off on Local nonprofit creates unique internship opportunities for business students Written on April 15th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Students

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Business Department Chair Lee Sellers is passionate about integrating practical experience into his students’ education. So when Andrew Stone at Kingdom Ministries needed interns to help support his young nonprofit, an on-going partnership was created.

“It seemed like a good opportunity to give young people real world experience while helping the organization grow more efficiently,” says Stone, who started the Portland nonprofit with his father, Multnomah alumnus Kevin Stone. Joined by their families, the father-son team equips ministries in Italy by connecting them to volunteers who serve in their summer camps, English classes and city festivals.

Mike Kamlade, Lindsey Weaver, Miranda Schmillen, Grant Warner and Lucia Morud are the interns supporting this mission. Over the course of the school year, the five business majors have diligently worked in finance, marketing and project management roles to promote, arrange and fund this year’s summer camps. They’ll see the culmination of their work in June when they travel with other Kingdom Ministries volunteers to Italy.

Although they’ve encountered a number of hurdles throughout the planning process, the interns say the hiccups are undeniably constructive. “It's teaching me to adapt to my surroundings and be open to learning new things,” says finance intern Mike Kamlade.

Project management intern Lindsey Weaver had to adapt too. “Once you get out of the classroom and deal with people in real life, it changes things,” she says.“I looked for this kind of opportunity in high school, but nothing ever came up.” Weaver’s duties include liaising with contacts, coordinating schedules and planning trip logistics.

Miranda Schmillen, who’s responsible for tracking donations and budgeting, admits the internship would be much harder if she was unequipped. But luckily she has a semester of accounting under her belt. “My accounting class totally helped me,” says the finance intern.

Stone’s instruction has only built upon students’ knowledge, and his attentiveness has inspired them to do their best. “He’s super ambitious and has these huge ideas, but he’s also hands-on and shows you how to do things,” says Schmillen.

Stone has simply created an optimal space for trial, error and learning.“They’re getting experience they won’t get anywhere else,” he says. “It’s a very safe environment to learn in.”

It may have been safe, but it wasn’t easy. The interns have bonded through shared struggles and successions — and they’ve emerged stronger than ever. “This internship has blessed me more than I expected because of the relationships I've built with the other interns and the Stone family,” says Kamlade. “They are all great people.”

For more information about this internship and Kingdom Ministries, visit BuildingTheKingdom.org.

Mixing Bible with career: business owner joins degree completion program

Comments Off on Mixing Bible with career: business owner joins degree completion program Written on April 7th, 2016 by
Categories: Programs, Students

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Curt Heitschmidt worked in construction for more than 20 years. His cabinet business was successful, and he was enjoying life with his wife and three kids.

But he was ready for something different.

“I decided to drop everything and finish my degree because I wanted to learn more about business after owning one for so long,” Heitschmidt says. “I knew that I could study business anywhere, but the business and Bible combination was what I really wanted.”

Multnomah stood out as his best option. He applied to the management & ethics program (which recently changed its name to the business management program) in MU’s Degree Completion Program. Heitschmidt was accepted, and he entered the program with anticipation.

Studying business and the Bible with his classmates has not been disappointing. They even make things more fun by bringing food each week to share with each other. “My cohort experience has been a good mix,” he says. “It’s great to come together around a meal and support each other.”

Going back to school is always challenging, and Heitschmidt’s journey is no different. “Chaos is a constant theme in my life right now,” he says. “My family and I have just moved, my wife works nights, and I’m enrolled full-time in the degree completion program.” But he has no regrets. He even insists his homework load has been manageable alongside his other duties.

Heitschmidt says he’ll probably return to construction after he graduates. But he’ll reenter the field with a revived understanding of what it means to combine Bible with career.

“I’m learning that the Bible isn’t just a handbook,” he says. “It never specifically tells you what to do in each situation. You have to figure out how to bring its principles into the work environment.” Multnomah is equipping him with the tools to do just that.

Spring Thaw unites, inspires local youth groups

Comments Off on Spring Thaw unites, inspires local youth groups Written on April 5th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Programs, Students

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Spring Thaw kicked off last weekend, and attendees filled MU’s campus with the contagious energy only 650 high school students could bring. From Friday evening to Sunday afternoon, the weekend was packed with activities, including a comedy show, paintball, a game truck, sports tournaments and a photo booth.

For the past six years, Multnomah has been hosting a weekend-long retreat for local high school youth groups. The theme changes from year to year, but there’s always dynamic speaking and teaching, interactive games, and limitless space for students to experience God outside their usual routine.

This year’s theme, PDXperience, brought almost every Portland stereotype onto one campus. A swarm of camping tents were pitched in the North Bradley lawn, an array of food carts circled the gym parking lot, and the main stage was propped with iconic Portland symbols like the White Stag sign. At night, Roger’s Cafe was transformed into a hipster coffee shop. A live piano filled the room with jazz while students fueled up on caffeine before competing in Nerf challenges and Library Laser Tag.

“It’s super fun; the whole thing is enjoyable,” remarked Julia, a student from Grace Point Community Church in Tigard, who said there wasn’t one thing she didn’t like.

Youth Ministry Department Chair Dr. Rob Hildebrand has been running Spring Thaw since he dreamt it up in 2010, but he decided to take a well-deserved hiatus this year. Luckily for youth groups everywhere, Director of Auxiliary Services Bobby Howell stepped in to fill Hildebrand’s shoes. A team of volunteers from the Multnomah community and Central Bible Church worked hard alongside him to produce this year’s event.

When students weren’t noshing on food cart fare or darting around the pitch-black library with plastic laser guns, they were soaking up the wisdom of A.J. Swaboda, a local pastor, professor and author who served as the event’s main speaker. Swaboda pushed the high schoolers to examine their faith more deeply by candidly explaining what following Jesus really requires. The students thought he was relatable and straightforward.

“It’s nice that A.J. is addressing what it’s like to be a Christian,” said Kaylea, a sophomore from Grace Community Church in Gresham. “He’s addressing a reality.”

Brianne, who’s also from Grace Community, agrees. “I like how honest A.J. is,” she said. “He doesn’t sugarcoat things.”

Youth ministry major Brian Hall has been involved with Spring Thaw for the past four years. Aside from garnering skills and experience vital to his field of study, he truly enjoys seeing the impact the retreat has on students. “They’re getting real life stuff from people other than their youth pastors,” he said. “And it’s a fun time for the Kingdom.”

Youth Director Michael Calquhoun from Gladstone First Baptist brings his youth group back every year for that very reason. And because they don’t stop talking about it once they’ve left. “It’s a good way to build community,” he said “We get to know each other better and share common experiences. And we fall more in love with God.”

Words like that are music to Howell’s ears. “We wanted to provide a setting with quality teaching, where any youth group from any denomination could attend and enjoy the camaraderie of being with other youth groups,” he said. “I want students to be energized to take up the cross past this event — to take it back to their everyday lives. I want them to be the light of Christ.”

Ten ways to prep for a job while you’re still at MU

Comments Off on Ten ways to prep for a job while you’re still at MU Written on April 4th, 2016 by
Categories: Students

Carley Wecks, our career coach in the Career Services Department, shares a few tips on preparing for a job while you’re still in college.

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1. Start networking with professors, friends, church contacts, business contacts, or even people you meet casually. Prepare a 30-second elevator pitch about the type of career you’re looking for. You never know what kind of opportunities the people you talk with may be connected to!

2. Not sure what career path interests you? Explore your personality, interests and spiritual gifts with the specialized tools provided by the Career Services Department. (Make an appointment with Carley Wecks for details!)

3. Sign up for Optimal Resume and receive access to MU’s electronic job board, which features part-time, full-time and internship opportunities.

4. Make good use of your Service Learning hours and internships by building your experience and networking with coworkers. (Remember: MU’s electronic job board has a list of available internships to choose from.) Talk to your academic adviser for specific suggestions.

5. Like Multnomah University Career Services on Facebook and Twitter for helpful articles, new job opportunities and career advice.

6. Schedule an informational interview with someone who’s established in the field you’re considering. Find out what their typical day is like. Ask them what do they like and don’t like about their job. They can give you invaluable feedback.

7. Practice interviewing, develop a resumé, or get tips on crafting cover letters — Optimal Resume has got you covered. (Make sure to sign up if you haven’t already!)

8. Need more direction? Sit down with Carley Wecks in the Career Services Department. Get the one-on-one coaching you need to determine your interests and plan your next steps.

9. Visit the Multnomah Career Services page for more job postings and other helpful resources.

10. Trust in God, and don’t underestimate the power of prayer. Ask the Lord for wisdom and direction as you move forward. Remember: He knows the work that suits you best!

Make an appointment with Carley Wecks by emailing careerservices@multnomah.edu or by calling 503-251-6472.

Seminary students selected third year in a row for internships at Oxford

Comments Off on Seminary students selected third year in a row for internships at Oxford Written on March 30th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Faculty, Programs, Seminary, Students

The polished halls of Oxford University have been steeped in centuries’ worth of scholarly culture. Their crevices contain manuscripts, statues, engravings and echoes of the past. What better place for world-renowned biblical experts and students to gather?

For the third year in a row, a handful of Multnomah seminary students has been selected to attend the Logos Conference, a two-week internship in June sponsored by the Scholars Initiative. Any students who have worked on Scholars Initiative projects are invited to apply to the workshop. Scholars from more than 60 schools in North America submit applications, but only 30 students are chosen for the trip.

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 ‘Shocked and overjoyed’

Oxford3_blogChad Woodward had his eyes on Oxford ever since his classmate Daniel Somboonsiri was selected two years ago. “It was a goal I’d set for myself,” Woodward says. “I was on the edge of my seat waiting, and when I heard I was chosen, I felt validated as a Hebrew scholar.”

Alyssa Schmidt is equally enthusiastic. “I’m really excited to be around people who are passionate about God’s word, and to have so much opportunity for learning within two short weeks,” she says.

Ruben Alvarado received his invitation two weeks later than his classmates. He thought he hadn’t made it in. When he finally heard the news, he was ecstatic. “I couldn’t sleep that night,” he says. “I was shocked and overjoyed.”

 ‘Engaging and exploring’

Biblical Languages Chair Dr. Karl Kutz encouraged Woodward, Alvarado and Schmidt to apply for the intership. “We really enjoy our students and are proud of them,” he says. Kutz will join his students at Oxford for three days of the conference.

The conference schedule is packed with activity. There will be excursions to Winchester Abbey and Tyndale House, evensong services at Christ Cathedral, lectures from renowned scholars, tours to the Bodlian and Parker Libraries, and discussions around pots of tea. Guests will even be lodging in an ivy-cloaked Victorian house up the lane.

“This seminar is helpful for two reasons,” Kutz says. “First, students will be able build friendships with peers in the same position. Second, they will be exposed to key scholars who have figured out what it’s like to live as a Christian in the academic world.”

Dr. Rebekah Josberger, who teaches Hebrew at Multnomah, is thrilled to see how her students will grow through this opportunity. “Learning isn’t about ‘arriving’ and knowing everything,” she says. “It’s about engaging, asking questions and exploring. This all happens at the conference.”

Needless to say, this environment of exploration will boost the future careers of attendees. “It’s continued exposure to what I love and enjoy,” Woodward says. “It will bring my studies to a different level.”

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 ‘A community of excellent teachers’

All three students are brimming with praise for the quality of Multnomah’s Hebrew program. “Our professors have created a program that’s different,” says Schmidt. “It’s not just classes, but a community of excellent teachers.”

Kutz prioritizes time with his students during the trip. While other professors wander off on their own adventures, he joins his group in a pub to discuss the highlights of the conference.

“The Hebrew community is a family,” says Woodward. “It’s not just instructive; professors take an active role in our lives and come alongside us as friends.”

Alvarado wholeheartedly concurs. “It’s been the experience of a lifetime to study under Dr. Kutz and Dr. Josberger,” he says. “They teach us the language and teach us how to live life.”

Although the two weeks are crammed with scholastics, MU students are also looking forward to sightseeing. Schmidt will be stopping by Paris on her way home. Alvarado will visit several of London’s tourist attractions like the British Museum, the Tower of London and the National Gallery.

Woodward is planning to take full advantage of the international experience. It’s his 10th wedding anniversary, and he just bought a plane ticket for his wife so they can explore England together after the conference. “It will be a good balance between work and play,” he says. Cheers to that.

MU initiates Encouragement Week, supports students during midterms

Comments Off on MU initiates Encouragement Week, supports students during midterms Written on March 11th, 2016 by
Categories: Events, Students

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Midsemester often finds students buried in flashcards, wading through pages of reading and  furiously typing out last-minute papers. It’s the perfect time for some encouragement from MU staff and faculty.

Associate Dean of Students Rich Ward was inspired to coordinate a new event — Encouragement Week — because he wanted each student to feel supported and loved during one of the most stressful times of the semester. “When people know that they matter, they feel that they belong,” he says.

If you walk down the hall of the JCA Student Center, you’ll notice posters with inspirational messages littering the walls. If you take a peek into the business office,  you’ll be treated to a table of donuts and handwritten Bible verses. Just around the corner at the registrar’s desk, a bowlful of green apple lollipops is flanked by signs that say, “You rock”.

“It’s a great way for staff to connect with students,” says Chris Thiessen, who works in Advancement. “We don’t have that opportunity as often as the faculty do.”

Ward planned surprises for each day of the week: bracelets on Monday, designated prayer for students on Tuesday, intentional time during lunch on Wednesday, gift packages and notes from alumni on Thursday, and fist bumps on Friday. “I wanted to incorporate all five love languages throughout the week,” he says.

Bible and theology major Jennifer Kildal is one of the many students who appreciates the thoughtfulness. “It’s cool to be at a school where they actually appreciate their students,” she says.

Seminary announces fully online Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Christian Leadership degrees

Comments Off on Seminary announces fully online Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Christian Leadership degrees Written on February 26th, 2016 by
Categories: Seminary, Students

Multnomah Biblical Seminary is proud to announce that it will be offering its Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Christian Leadership degrees fully online beginning fall 2016.

This change was made possible by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS), which approved an exemption to the residency requirements* for the Master of Divinity and MA in Christian Leadership degrees. Typically, these programs have strict rules for on-campus learning, but ATS has waived these restrictions for MU so its students can now earn either degree fully online.

“We’re so excited that ATS granted our request to excuse students from having a residency requirement,” says Seminary Dean Dr. Roy Andrews. “Now we’ll be able to offer a high-quality theological education to students all over the world without them needing to relocate to Portland.”

Students can expect to connect with their classmates and professors through online discussions, email, chat and videoconferencing. But the learning won’t stop there: Andrews says the seminary will work to create partnerships between the student, an on-site mentor and a local church.

“This means the student can stay connected in his or her church, workplace and neighborhood, all while having the opportunity to be transformed by a Multnomah Biblical Seminary education,” he says. “These elements will provide the important components of spiritual formation and community that are often missing in distance education programs. Online students really can have the best of both worlds.”

Multnomah Biblical Seminary also offers a fully online Master of Arts in Biblical Studies program and a fully online Master of Arts in Theological Studies program. Find out more at multnomah.edu/online.

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*The Association of Theological Schools (ATS) has approved an exemption to the residency requirements (Degree Program Standard A, section A.3.1.3, and Degree Program Standard B, section B.3.1.3) for these degrees, permitting them to be offered fully online beginning fall 2016.

Multnomah community celebrates 80th birthday

1 Comment » Written on February 22nd, 2016 by
Categories: 80th Anniversary, Alumni, Newsletter, Students

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On February 12, graduates from almost every year of MU’s history met in the JCA Student Center. As they shared in a banquet celebration, the room was rich with stories, and the air was steeped in nostalgia.

“Being at Multnomah was one of the best experiences I’ve had,” said Alex Paterno ’11.

Bonny Lloyd ’59 agreed. “For me, Multnomah was life-changing,” she said. “I’m still teaching the Bible to young women. It’s been my life.”

University President Dr. Craig Williford addressed the importance of upholding Dr. Mitchell’s vision of loving the Savior as Multnomah continues to expand its program options. “More than ever before, the world needs MU graduates who know the Bible,” he said.

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Distinguished Professor Emeritus David Needham reminded everyone to reflect on the Lord’s steadfast love over the years. “We’re here to affirm the faithfulness of God,” he said. “The God who is faithful is the God who will always love us.”

As MU moves forward in a flurry of new programs and initiatives, a time to pause and reflect on our past is a welcome oasis. “The school has come a long way,” said Mildred Dunham ’44. “My time at Multnomah was a lot of fun and a great learning experience.”

A lot may have changed, but 80 years later, one thing remains the same: Multnomah is serious about providing a life-changing education deeply rooted in God’s Word.

Campus happenings

Comments Off on Campus happenings Written on February 22nd, 2016 by
Categories: Athletics, Events, Newsletter, Students

MU ranked No. 2 on list of safest colleges, universities in Oregon

The 2016 Safest College Campuses national rankings, published by niche.com, are based on key statistics and student reviews.
Top-ranked colleges offer a safe and healthy environment with little or no campus crime, drugs and alcohol usage. “We watch out for each other and take care of each other,” said Director of Campus Safety Josh Harper. “This is a large part of making our campus safe to live, work and learn in.”

MU celebrates 10 years of providing free English classes to local immigrant communities

For 10 years, MU’s TESOL program has been offering free weekly ESL classes to its diverse neighbors. “ESL meets a practical need in our community,” says TESOL Director Kristyn Kidney. “It brings the world together through dialogue and friendship.”

Lions team up with Tim Tebow Foundation, local church for Night to Shine

The women’s basketball team joined with the Tim Tebow Foundation and Central Bible Church to present Night to Shine, a prom
for people with special needs. More than 100 churches around the world were chosen to host Night to Shine events on Friday, February 12, 2016.

Roger’s Café celebrates five years of coffee and community

Five years ago, students voted to name MU’s new coffee shop after Roger, a beloved community figure who has been cleaning tables, arranging napkins and befriending students as a faithful volunteer for more than 35 years. The café has been a irreplaceable fixture on campus ever since.

Students collect food for Giving Tuesday, donate proceeds to Oregon Food Bank

Through the month of November, students, faculty and staff added non-perishable foods to large white barrels stationed around campus. The food drive culminated in a celebratory chapel on Giving Tuesday (December 2), a globally celebrated day dedicated to giving back. The full barrels were then given to the Oregon Food Bank.

‘A holy place’: 58 years later, MU’s prayer chapel remains a sacred haven on campus

Comments Off on ‘A holy place’: 58 years later, MU’s prayer chapel remains a sacred haven on campus Written on February 12th, 2016 by
Categories: Alumni, Students

A little white prayer chapel sits in the center of Multnomah’s campus. It’s hemmed in by hydrangea puffs and leafy foliage, and its cross-topped steeple pokes above the birch and cherry trees that cast their shade against its whitewashed walls. Inside, the sunlight filters through pale magenta windowpanes onto rows of oaken pews. It smells slightly aged — like a room matured by many visitors.

The altar is the centerpiece. There is a simple wooden cross and mahogany Wurlitzer piano with a worn-out bench and open hymnbook. Above it is a stained glass image of the cross overshadowing the globe.

Those who seek the Lord have found him in the sacred silence of this hiding place.

The Center of Campus

Since its construction in 1957, the little building has been a quiet refuge, a safe hideaway, a quaint aesthetic addition, and an invitation to enter into a different sort of lifestyle.

“The chapel was built to provide a place on campus for students to get away and talk to the Lord,” says Distinguished Professor Emeritus David Needham.

“Prayer at MU is taken seriously,” says Vice President of Advancement Steve Cummings. “Everything we do is bathed in prayer because we know that we don’t move forward unless the Lord leads us.”

Alumna Emi Koe remembers the reason for the chapel’s central location: “The slogan when we were students was that the prayer chapel was the center of campus as prayer should be the center of our lives,” she says.

“It is a true and meaningful symbol to have the prayer chapel with its clean, white lines and its steeple pointing toward God in the center of campus,” adds alumna Gail Lundquist. “May it truly be Multnomah’s desire to have prayer as the foundation for everything.”

‘A Different Kind of Quiet’

But the chapel isn’t only a symbol, of course.

At the beginning of her sojourn at Multnomah, Regina Molokomme slipped into the prayer chapel to commit the next few years to the Lord. In response to God’s calling, she had recently moved from South Africa to enroll in seminary.

“I did not know about the journey ahead of me, but I just presented myself to God,” she says. From complete funding for school, to strength for her studies, to a vision for the future, Molokomme has consistently received God’s provision.“My prayers have been answered in that place,” she says.

While it serves as a site of initial dedication, the prayer chapel is also a space for continued communion with God. “When I am there, I am affirmed that he is with me,” says youth ministry major Josh Smith.

“It’s a holy place set apart from the stress of academia,” says English major Rebekah Nayduik. “There’s a peace when you walk in.”

English major Sierra McKinney agrees. “It’s a different kind of quiet. I walked in and felt this calmness.”

Memorable Moments

Throughout the process of schooling at MU, biblical studies major Curtis Bell spent intentional time in the silence provided by the prayer chapel. “I remember my best friend Cory and I praying in there daily,” he says. “We broke down and prayed for our families. We were even on the floor weeping. Those were precious moments with my best friend and the Lord.”

Alumnus Larry Day remembers similar moments within. “I would go there for quiet time when I was confused about what God wanted,” he says. “It’s a significant place to me.”

A few years ago, Day and his wife decided to refurbish the prayer chapel at their own expense. They replaced the pews, adjusted the altar area, and added a soft new carpet so that people could spend time on their knees. “There is something that happens to our soul when we kneel before God,” Day says.

Master of Arts in Counseling student Zach Jones noticed that the intimacy of the prayer chapel was also perfect for a different kind of kneeling. With the romantic addition of decorative lights and music, he proposed to his wife Sarah inside of it.

“The chapel will always be special to us,” Sarah says. “It reminds us that God was in our lives long before each other; he’s the one that brought us together.”

The Legacy Continues

After the graduation gown has been donned, and the diploma presented, and the path away from Multnomah has been blazed, the prayer chapel still stands as a monument; it’s a place for returning and reflecting.

Alumnus Scott Burns remembers God’s faithfulness whenever he visits. Although it’s a long way from his home in England, he continues to stop in from time to time.

“I’ve spent numerous hours with God in that tiny little building,” he says. “It resulted in me walking forward with a greater awareness of my need for Jesus and knowing how desperately I need His power to be at work in and through me.”

As the years roll on and the steady stream of quiet visitors filters in and out, the prayer chapel remains the birthplace of vision, the assurance of God’s presence, the place where prayers are answered, and a reminder of what he has done in each life that passes through.