Posts Tagged ‘emergent’

Moving Beyond Extremes to Gospel-Centered Love

Extreme positions often get the biggest hearing. It seems like you have to be liberal or conservative or pro-choice or pro-life to get people to listen. People so easily close their ears and hearts and shut the door when complexity enters the conversation. Read the rest of this entry »

What Is This “Emerging Church” You Speak Of?

3 comments Written on February 10th, 2009 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood

As president, I receive a lot of mail with all kinds of questions.  A recent persistent question is:

"Where does Multnomah stand on the emerging church?"

My usual answer is brief: "Multnomah has not chosen to take a stand on the emerging church issue."  This is because the emerging church, like a number of other issues batted around in evangelical circles, means a lot of radically different things to different people. 

I just read an insightful article by Mark Driscoll that helped me unravel some of the dispirit threads of this issue.  The article, "Navigating the Emerging Church Highway," was published in a recent issue of The Christian Research Journal (vol. 31, no. 04). Mark, the preaching pastor at Mars Hill Church in Seattle, provides a helpful synopsis to the four "lanes on the emerging church highway."

Briefly, those 4 lanes are:

  1. Emerging Evangelicals
  2. House Church Evangelicals
  3. Emerging Reformers
  4. Emergent Liberals. 

The first three are united in embracing orthodox theology, while holding different views of the mission and purpose of the church.  The Emergent Liberals, on the other hand, have rejected much of orthodox theology.  Driscoll directs most of his attention on this final group, including an intense analysis of its major proponents: Brian McLaren, Doug Pagitt, and Rob Bell.

Because one can get the impression from reading many of the contemporary books on this topic that there is only one emergent church movement (and it's the liberal one), many conclude there really cannot be any legitimate evangelical expression of the movement.  Mark Driscoll clears away some theological smoke for me. 

Perhaps it will for you, too.