Posts Tagged ‘lockwood’

Is Gov’t Opening Door To Christian College Discrimination?

Comments Off Written on December 8th, 2010 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood, General, Media, Pray For MU

Recently, Multnomah President Dr. Daniel Lockwood was on The Georgene Rice Show to discuss a major piece of rule-making on the part of the federal government that threatens to create a layer of governmental oversight of private institutions that also opens the door for various forms of discrimination against institutions who have a faith-based mission.

During the interview, this article from Christianity Today was referenced. Read the rest of this entry »

A Letter from Dr. Dan – March 2010

March 15, 2010 - Dr. Lockwood, President of Multnomah University frequently writes letters to alumni, donors and friends of the school. Here's his latest.
***

The “new year” is not simply upon us; it’s in the middle of its third month!  As we in Portland are grateful for a fairly mild winter, we at Multnomah are encouraged by the things God is doing during the first two and one-half months of our spring semester.  Let me give a few updates.

Enrollment

Our total enrollment for the spring semester stood at 844 students (headcount) when registration was complete.  We have 629 students in the college and 215 in the seminary, just two off from last spring.  Our two Portland campus programs are about on pace from last spring, but our university master’s programs show a significant increase (61).  At our off-site locations, we have 17 collegians and five seminarians taking classes in Reno, and five seminarians registered in Anchorage.  We praise the Lord for these students; Multnomah continues to impact students with God’s Word.  These numbers also represent a stability in tuition revenues—an encouraging sign in a continuing tight economy.

New Seminary Faculty

At the seminary, under Dr. Redman’s leadership, we have developed a new paradigm to fill faculty vacancies.  Three faculty members have been appointed as “regular part-time” faculty in pastoral ministry.  This means they will continue to lead their local churches while teaching a half-time load at the seminary.  What is unique is this: they will be active participants in faculty discussions with full “voice and vote.”  In this way, they will provide valuable expertise for fashioning a pastoral ministry curriculum for the next generation.  Our regular full time faculty members can anticipate a multi-dimensional team of colleagues with a hearty esprit d’corps.  Our three appointees for the next academic year are:

  • Dr. Gene Curtis, D.Min, pastor of Meadow Springs Community Church, Multnomah Biblical Seminary graduate.  He will teach homiletics.
  • Dr. Rick McKinley, D.Min, founding pastor of Portland’s Imago Dei, a Multnomah Bible College graduate.  He will teach in the area of biblical leadership.
  • Prof. Tom Schiave, D.Min (cand.), pastor of Gateway Baptist Church.  He will teach in the areas of spiritual formation and communication.

Global Ministries Conference

Multnomah held its annual Global Ministries Conference the last week of this month.  With its “Harvesting the Desert” theme, this year’s emphasis was God’s work in the Middle East.  Twenty-five mission agencies and 68 missionaries were on Multnomah’s campus.  [Name Witheld], who works with Arab believers through [Ministry Organization Name Witheld], and Sarah Perlman, who works with Jews for Jesus, served as plenary speakers.  They provided complementary—and controversial—perspectives on Middle Eastern ministry.  Multnomah continues to send a significant number of students into global ministry opportunities each year, and this conference again was a catalyst for God’s Spirit to nudge open hearts.

[Names witheld above for security reasons]

Regional accreditation (NWCCU)

Accreditation is always on our horizon, but now more than ever.  Last summer, we were informed that NWCCU was revising its accrediting standards, and that Multnomah University would be up for a full self-study visit in April 2011.  That’s just a little over a year from now!  Dr. Wayne Strickland, who will lead this effort, is already hard at work in responding to these new standards.  We are being asked to evaluate our institution according to basic themes, such as knowing God’s Word, thinking critically, growing in Christ-likeness, and engaging our culture.  Please pray for us as we embark on this important self-assessment.

Online technology

Technology supports Multnomah’s mission more than ever before, and we are grateful for our professional IT staff.  Several new things are happening.  First, our Promotions & Communications department is in the process of thoroughly redesigning our website.  This is extremely important since more and more students learn about—and apply to—Multnomah through this online portal.  In fact, January saw an unprecedented spike in online applications for this coming fall.  Working for over a year, we anticipate the official launch this spring. 

Second, our Career Development Department, which now serves the entire university under Jim Saemenes’ direction, uses the Ministry Web Directory.  This amazing tool connects students with ministries and marketplace opportunities.  Already, prospective students are drawn to Multnomah because of such vocational opportunities when they graduate.

Financial support

The Lord has favored our advancement department, under Paul’s Griffin’s oversight, with wonderful success.  Of course, the development staff has worked extremely hard during this economic recession, too.  For example, the team is on track to hit its financial targets for the last eight months, largely, I believe, by cultivating personal relationships with people like you.  They also did a terrific job in planning, organizing, and pulling off our largest Student Aid Banquet event on the Saturday of March 6th.  Over 450 attended to hear wonderful testimonies from students and alumni of what God is doing in them because of Multnomah.  Many, many people gave.  They remembered what Jesus said, “I tell you, use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings” (Luke 16:9).

Thank You

Thanks you so much for your faithful prayer support of Multnomah’s vital ministry.  I cannot tell you what this means to our faculty, staff, and students. Your prayers have a way of saying to faculty and staff, “You’re not alone in this ministry.  The Lord is confirming the work you do.”  Your support speaks clearly to students that the Lord will provide in many ways—including through gifts from supporters they may never meet.  These serious-minded men and women are empowered to study deeply the Word of God at Multnomah and to pursue wholeheartedly their dreams of being equipped for the vocation God has chosen for them. 

Longing for the eternal dwellings, 

Daniel R. Lockwood
President

Dr. Dan’s Archives – February 2008

Comments Off Written on February 19th, 2010 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood, General, Programs, Seminary

February 28, 2008. This is a one of the near-monthly letters Dr. Lockwood sends to donors and alumni. See more archives here.
***

Throughout my twenty-eight years at Multnomah, one thing always inspires wonder: that the Word of God—living, active, sharper than a double-edged sword—shapes and sharpens lives in miraculous ways.

Just Ask Bruce

In fact, that is why students enroll here. Just ask Bruce, one of my students in Grad Theology. Retired, an empty nester, and a committed churchman, Bruce, along with his wife Cathy, travelled to Multnomah from Paradise, California. “For years, I’ve known Multnomah’s reputation for teaching the Bible,” Bruce says to me, “and that is why I’m here.”

Bruce is a man of deep, genuine faith who served in his local church in many ways. But, approaching sixty years of age, Bruce discovered something was missing. “In a nutshell,” he admits, “I realized I was biblically illiterate! Sure, I knew enough of the basic doctrines of the Bible to function, but I hungered to know the deeper things of the Word, to wrestle with the great issues of the faith, and to forge my own positions as a result of personal study.”

Into Leadership With No Training

Perhaps what alarmed Bruce most was that he—and scores of others like him—are thrust into positions of leadership without really understanding the fundamental things of God. So, he seized the opportunity to study at Multnomah to fill this spiritual void. “For years, I’ve been told what to believe,” he remembers. “Now, for the first time, I am beginning to discover what I really believe and why.”

By his own admission, Bruce, in the first year of a two-year MAPS program, will never be the same. And it is Multnomah’s unique blend of biblical knowledge applied to the spiritual issues of life that drives this. “Multnomah’s professors push me to ask the tough spiritual questions,” Bruce explains, “like ‘What is the condition of your soul?’ For decades, I have longed for this direction!”

There is nothing more exciting—and rewarding—that this: to see how the Word of God transforms minds and hearts of men and women who will, in turn, change the world.

Rejoicing in life-change,

Daniel R. Lockwood
President

2009 President’s Annual Report

Comments Off Written on February 9th, 2010 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, General, Media, Programs, University Name Change

At the beginning of every year, many folks tend to go through their time of reflecting on the year just passed and looking forward to developments in the year ahead. Well, we do the same things as an organization here.

Reflection

At Multnomah, we ask many things of our president. Among them a "reflection," if you will, in the form of an annual report.

2009 President's Annual Report (PDF)
PAR09_Final_Web_Cover2

Looking Forward

In "looking forward," we've also asked Dr. Dan to star in an online video series where he discusses issues facing Multnomah and what we all might expect in the future. But far be it from him to simply lecture (it's not a classroom, afterall) - these videos are intended to be sparks that will bring feedback from you! As such, we've named the series "Conversations with Dr. Dan".

Enjoy!

MLK Service Day Wrap-up

Comments Off Written on January 20th, 2010 by
Categories: Dr. Lockwood, General, Media, Missions, Students

Dr. Lockwood joined 95 students from Multnomah University, who gave up their holiday "day off", to take part in the first ever college and university MLK Jr Day of Service here in Portland. Estimates of 1,200-1,300 students were at the rally from 11 colleges and universities and 1,100 at the service projects.

The day of service began at 9 a.m. with a rally at Concordia, including music by King Elementary School's choir and remarks from Portland Mayor Sam Adams, Concordia President Charles Schlimpert and Pastor Mark Strong of Life Change Christian Center.

Immediately following the rally, student’s boarded busses for project sites across Portland. There was a wide variety of projects included refurbishing schools, churches and community centers.

The day inspired some intense conversation about the meaning of service and what students can do with their skills and talents! MU students really valued working with other college students and learning why they serve compared to why MU students were serving.

History

In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. proclaimed, "Everybody can be great because everybody can serve." Each year, colleges and universities hold events in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. throughout the country. This year, these efforts became collaborative; to enable college students from around the Portland Metro area both learn and serve together for greater community-wide impact.

Media Coverage

Reflections from Dr. Willard Aldrich’s Memorial Service

Comments Off Written on December 15th, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Faculty, General, Willard Aldrich

December 12, 2009

2007I am privileged to be invited to reflect on Dr. Willard Aldrich’s influence on Multnomah University.  Believe me, Multnomah would not be what it is today without his profound tenure as our second president.

I will always remember Dr. Willard as a distinguished man.  He was distinguished in appearance, in demeanor, and in manner.  But when I assess his impact on Multnomah, I would call him a man of distinction.  Of course, he was a distinctive president in some obvious ways.  He was Multnomah’s youngest president, appointed to the office when he was only 34 years old.  He also served the longest tenure of any of the four presidents—a remarkable 35 years.  I doubt whether those two records will ever be broken.  They certainly will not be surpassed by the one Multnomah president still standing in the room!  But Dr. Willard was a man of distinction in much deeper ways.

Dr. Willard, the TheologianDrWillardAldrich

First, Dr. Willard was a man of distinction as a theologian.  He loved teaching students theology and did so throughout his entire career.  He will be remembered especially for his two beloved specialties: the great doctrines of our salvation and of the grace of God.  But more importantly, Dr. Willard was a noted theologian at a time in the Bible college movement when theology was often regarded with suspicion.  To have a theologian as president identified Multnomah as an institution which takes the great doctrines of the faith seriously.

As a theologian, Dr. Willard was also a Biblicist.  He loved the Scriptures.  He was, after all, the one who coined Multnomah’s famous motto, “If it’s Bible you want, then you want Multnomah.”  But Dr. Willard always elevated the Bible over doctrine, always willing to adjust his theological conclusions if the biblical text demanded, not the other way around.  Not every institution takes this priority seriously.  Multnomah University does so today, and it is part of Dr. Willard’s legacy.

His theology was a warm theology.  The tag line on Multnomah’s doctrinal statement for many years was, “and we believe in doing something about it.”  I do not know whether he actually wrote this, but he certainly believed it, modeled it, and lived it.

After Dr. Willard retired from the presidency in 1978, he continued to teach theology for half a decade more.  I was on faculty when he finally retired from teaching.  At a ceremony I will never forget, Dr. Willard received a new Jeep.  I understood the practical nature of this gift, of course, but I always suspected it was also a metaphor for a man who enjoyed spending his life navigating the rocky roads of contemporary theology.

willard005Dr. Willard, the Educator

Second, Dr. Willard was a man of distinction as an educator, overseeing Multnomah’s development from a financially fragile Bible School to a robust institution of excited Jesus people.  He understood curriculum, having begun his career as registrar, and he spent his entire tenure developing a respected faculty.
He oversaw the move of the campus from the mortuary on NE Halsey St. to a blind school on NE Glisan St.  Believe me, I think I’ve heard every possible joke about this!  He was a great builder.  Memorial Dorm, Bradley Hall, the Prayer Chapel, Lytle Gymnasium, and his beloved A-Frame remain as part of his legacy.  Out of a passion for missions, he launched the Grad Certificate program in 1947.  He added college majors in the early 60s and developed two master’s programs that became cornerstones for Multnomah Biblical Seminary years later.

He was a charter member of the American Association of Bible Colleges (AABC) and led Multnomah to its first national accreditation five years later, proclaiming Multnomah’s commitment to quality biblical training and positioning Multnomah to pursue accreditation in the future.

Dr. Willard, the Servant-Leader

Third, Dr. Willard was a man of distinction as a servant leader.  The term servant-leader is a term that is tossed around a lot these willard_bradleydays.  In my last twelve years in this office, I have met many presidents of Bible College and seminaries.  I have not found that humility and grace are ubiquitous traits!  But for Dr. Willard they were genuine.  I have often wondered how such humility was formed.  Was it that he was mentored very early by two older, godly men, Dr. Mitchell and Dr. Sutcliffe?  Or was it that he served for decades beneath their long and significant shadows without complaint.  Perhaps humility was fostered by raising nine children, and keeping family such a high priority.  Or perhaps it was formed in the crucible of tragedy, including the loss of his first wife.

Dr. Willard served continuously as a trustee from 1936 to 2004, a period of 68 years.  I know he did not agree with all the decisions I made, and he would appropriately express his opinion in trustee meetings.  But outside the meetings, perhaps passing me in the parking lot, he was always generous with his encouragement.  “You’re doing a fine job, Dan,” he would tell me.  “You’re the right man for president.”  He did not need to say this; but he did and it meant the world.

Yes, Dr. Willard was a man of distinction: as theologian, as educator, and as servant-leader.  But I actually will remember him for something more, something greater, and something far more important.  It was something he shared with his son, Dr. Joe.

This last year has been a difficult one for us, and for the Aldrich family.  Two of Multnomah’s four presidents have passed to glory.  But what characterized both of these men—father and son—is that they were faithful to the end.  They finished well.  When I think of Dr. Joe, I think of Abel—a man of faith cut off in the prime of his life by a tragic event.  But Dr. Joe finished well.  Dr. Willard, living over 100 years, was, I think, more like Enoch.  Throughout his long life, he simply walked with God.  But Dr. Willard was faithful to the end.

What a legacy.  I pray it is mine—and yours!

daniel-r-lockwood-sig

Dr. Dan Remembers Dr. Willard Aldrich

Dear Multnomah Family,

As many of you know by now, Dr. Willard Aldrich, Multnomah’s second president, passed into the presence of the Lord last Friday, November 27, at 3:00 am. The Lord was gracious in allowing him to pass away peacefully, under hospice care and surrounded by his family. He would have been 101 years old on January 4, 2010.

Friend and Founder

Dr. Willard was a close friend of Dr. John Mitchell, Multnomah’s founder, nearly all his life. He was a member of the first meeting on Valentine’s Day, 1936, that met to discuss—and decide—to launch a School of the Bible to meet the spiritual needs in the Northwest for training men and women in the Word of God. He was the school’s first registrar, and served on the board of trustees from 1936 through his retirement from the board in 2004. That’s a tenure of 68 years! It is a tribute to him that he was always an encouragement to me as I tried to fill the office he held for 35 years.

2nd President, Lasting Legacy

But by far his greatest and lasting legacy was his leadership of Multnomah as its second president. It was during his presidency that Multnomah moved to its current campus on Glisan Street, formerly the Oregon Trade School for the Blind (PDF, pg 5) , on acreage surrounded by nursery farms. The old cafeteria was renovated under his watch, and Memorial Dorm, Bradley Hall, the Dirks Prayer Chapel, and the Lytle Gymnasium were added to the campus during his presidency. Perhaps the project closest to his heart, though, was the A-Frame, patterned after a smaller version he built on his own property above Camas, Washington.

He also worked to secure Multnomah’s accreditation with ABHE, to pioneer the Grad Certificate program, to develop many of the majors , and to launch two masters’ programs (the Master of Arts in Biblical Studies and the Master of Sacred Ministry) which would later become part of the seminary. And, he coined Multnomah’s current motto, “If it’s Bible you want, then you want Multnomah.”

He taught systematic theology as a member of the faculty well into the 1980s, authored several books, published The Doorstep Evangel, which students would pass out on outreach day, and had a special place in his heart for the nation of Israel and Jewish evangelism. He and Doris were parents of nine children, many of whom were, or currently are, in vocational ministry. However, I cannot verify the rumor that he, Dr. Ted Bradley, and Dr. Roger Congdon competed for the largest family on faculty (Dr. Congdon would have won with 13!).

With Dr. Willard’s death, the last of the founders passes from this earth. But his memory, his legacy, and his impact on Multnomah and theological education will always remain.

Memorial Service

You are invited to his memorial service on December 12, 2009 at 2:00 pm. It will be held at Bethel Community Church in Washougal, Washington.

Warmly,

Daniel R. Lockwood
President
Multnomah University

PS - If you'd like to attend the memorial service, please let the church know or comment on this blog - if there are a lot of people they may need to move the service to a larger facility.

A Note Of Thanksgiving From The President

Comments Off Written on November 26th, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Faculty, General, Pray For MU

(Note: This is the first one in a series of posts where we will publish a near-monthly letter from the Dr. Lockwood that usually goes out to donors and supporters of Multnomah's ministry.)

Of Psalm 100 & Thanksgiving

I am not sure why I often think of Psalm 100 when Thanksgiving rolls around.  Probably, it’s because I memorized it as a child and it still sticks.  After all, who can ever forget that we are to “make a joyful noise!”

Apparently, I’m not alone.  Christians over the centuries have called this psalm, “The Old One Hundred.”  This November, in church services across the land and in hundreds of thousands of Christian homes, this psalm will be recited, read, prayed, or sung before the ritual of devouring the turkey begins.

What delights me most is that this venerable poem (for Hebrew poetry it is) is such good theology.  Its five short verses are anchored by two great truths about God.  Let’s explore them together, with illustrations from God’s work in, through, and with the people of Multnomah.

The Lord is God

The first great truth affirms the greatness of God (v. 3).  The Lord—Yahweh—is God, indeed!  And fittingly, this portion of the psalm is a call to exuberant worship.  Shout!  Rejoice!  Sing!  The psalmist summons us to uninhibited praise because that truly is the only acceptable response when we stand in the presence of the Lord our God.

Our students take this call to uninhibited, joyful worship literally.  This fall, our college chapel program moved onto campus, meeting often in the Joseph C. Aldrich student cafeteria.  It’s not as convenient as Central Bible’s auditorium: extra sound, lighting, staging, and a digital projector and screen had to be added.  A crew of student volunteers moves the dining room tables out of the way and arranges the 400 chairs in rows before chapel begins.  The space itself is barely large enough for our student body as they pack into the chairs or stand shoulder to shoulder in the back.

But they love it!  They define “close communion” creatively.  Veteran chapel-goers like me can sense renewed energy and excitement among the students for prayer, singing, and responding to the Word of God.

The psalmist, after exclaiming that the Lord is the sovereign God, then reminds us of who we are.  Notice the two descriptions (v. 3): we are His creatures (the Lord made us) and we are His sheep (the Lord shepherds us).  Just think of it!  Our great God is our Sovereign and our Shepherd.  We, on the other hand, are His fragile vessels and His vulnerable lambs.  No wonder we are called to worship this sovereign Shepherd.  All we are, all we have, and all we can become belong to Him.

As a campus community, we have witnessed—and endured—great sorrow this year.  Dr. Joe, Multnomah’s beloved third president, passed away last February from a debilitating fifteen years with Parkinson’s.  In May, Laura Silva and her brother-in-law alumnus Tony Silva were tragically taken in a climbing accident.  This September, Gordon Peterson, a well-regarded high school teacher in Vancouver and a 1984 alumnus, was struck and killed while riding his bicycle.  His daughter, Julia, a freshman at Multnomah this fall, continues to grieve with her family.

We cannot explain these events, nor are we called to do so.  Rather, we find comfort in a sovereign Shepherd who loves His sheep. 

The Lord is Good

The second great truth underscores the goodness of God (v. 5).  The Lord our God is a good God, the palmist explains.  And our appropriate response to this is thanksgiving—thanks laced with the praise that a supplicant would bear to a majestic ruler as he passes through the palace gates and enters the royal court.  How fitting!  We worship God because He is great.  We thank Him because He is good.  And, God’s goodness, the psalmist tells us, is expressed in two magnificent ways: His enduring love and His everlasting faithfulness.

At Multnomah we have witnessed God’s enduring love time after time.  We see it in the hundreds of new and returning students He entrusts us with each semester.  Each one is a walking miracle of God’s love and grace.  We observe it in the ways transformation takes place in those lives, even within the span of a semester.  We catch in the students that go out from here into all kinds of effective service—from vocational to marketplace ministries.

We also experience His everlasting faithfulness.  I don’t need to remind you that we are in a difficult economic climate.  Our enrollment has suffered in our traditional programs this fall, in large part because many students cannot afford to attend Multnomah right now.  All of us on faculty and staff are cutting necessary expenses to keep ahead of the financial curve.

Yet the Lord remains faithful, especially to some of our faithful donors have had to reduce their support as they deal with depleted retirement savings or loss of jobs.  I am so grateful at this special time of year for your faithfulness in supporting this work.  You indeed reflect God’s faithfulness to us!

Making a joyful noise to the Lord,

Daniel R. Lockwood
President

Was Reno Really Our 1st Extension Site?

One day, a wise and respected member of the Multnomah community with some knowledge and history under his belt mentioned to us that there used to be "Extension Sites" long ago for Multnomah. Certainly long before MU Reno-Tahoe was established!

I won't mention any names, but I'll shamelessly plug his blog here!

This would appear to be a problem since we're calling Reno-Tahoe our first extension site...so I did some sleuthing (big thanks to Dr. Lockwood for pointing me in the right direction).

Was Reno The First?

Upon further research, we have come up with this general consensus:

Stats

  • In the 1950's and 1960's, Drs. John Mitchell and Willard Aldrich used to travel to various locations in the Northwest and conduct Bible classes.
  • These included at least Puget Sound/Tacoma, Eugene, Spokane, Shasta, and Reno. There may have been others.
  • It is true, some expired and others have developed into independent Bible institutes.
  • Shasta has become Shasta Bible College and is now accredited by TRACS (the Trans-national Accrediting Association).
  • Spokane eventually was taken over by Moody Bible Institute.
  • The one in Tacoma/Puget sound became Cascade Bible College and approached us for a merger in the 1990's. We were not prepared to take it over. Eventually it was absorbed by Antioch Bible Church and merged with their Imago Dei Institute.
  • Reno had several incarnations, but never made it until Meadows Bible Institute emerged - which is now MU Reno-Tahoe.

Conclusions

  • None of these were ever intended to become extension sites of Multnomah.
  • Dr. Mitchell certainly never indicated that he envisioned a network of Multnomah campuses around the Northwest and West.
  • He was willing to help others get a work like Multnomah started and then let them develop independently if they desired.
  • Therefore, there were no Multnomah School of the Bible extension sites.
  • We understand them as good-faith efforts of the early founders to do ministry in other cities, but not to develop extension sites for Multnomah School of the Bible per se.

There You Have It!

How's that for a history lesson? I should write a textbook (*imagine my sarcastic intonation here)!

For Your Listening Pleasure

Comments Off Written on July 2nd, 2009 by
Categories: Alumni, Dr. Lockwood, Faculty, General, Media

h0109-216I recently ran across a recording of Dr. Lockwood preaching at Laurelwood Baptist Church on May 31, 2009. It was pretty good (even if he wasn't the boss around here, I'd still say it was good!). I recommend it.

Intimacy With God

He preaches for 31 minutes about Gideon's Ephod from Judges 8

Hear It

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Multnomah can help you with your pulpit supply, preaching or speaking event.