Posts Tagged ‘Rick McKinley’

Seminary professor launches new book about freedom

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Pastor Rick McKinley

Rick McKinley, MU professor and lead pastor of Imago Dei Community, has published his fifth book — "The Answer to Our Cry: Freedom to Live Fully, Love Boldly and Fear Nothing." The Multnomah Biblical Seminary alum planted Imago Dei in 2000 and travels widely to share local movements, such as Advent Conspiracy, with the broader Church.

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Today MU's marketing department is kicking off a book giveaway contest. Go to Twitter to share your answer to "What does freedom mean to you?" and Instagram to answer "What does freedom look like to you?" Use the hashtag #mufreedom to qualify. Three winners will be announced at noon on Friday, November 7. All winners receive a free copy of McKinley's new book.

Enjoy this excerpt from "The Answer to Our Cry":

Answer to our cryThe form that freedom takes in Scripture is relationship with God. This is the gravity that holds our lives together so that we can enjoy the life that God has given us. We call this the gospel: the Good News that God hears our cry and sent his Son to give us freedom. We might think about this saving story as a narrative that has five parts: creation, fall, redemption, restoration, and consummation. • Creation: A good God created a good world in perfection so that we could enjoy him and everything he had made. • Fall: Humankind fell away from this God, and the sin that happened in the garden led to spiritual and physical death. We all are alienated from God. • Redemption: God did not leave us to our own despair. He came after us by sending his Son to live the life we should have lived, die the death we should have died, and bring about a new creation both in us and in the world. • Restoration: This good God is currently restoring all things through Jesus and bringing about his new creation so that the world changes (and we change too). Pockets of new creation are breaking forth in the old creation, and new life is the beginning to dawn. • Consummation: One day God will bring his creation and us together into a new perfection. That is what he originally created in the Garden of Eden. All pain and suffering will be done away with because this good God is making everything new. Creation, fall, redemption, restoration and consummation. And it really is good news! However, that’s not all there is. God’s nature and being are the main text of the story, and our experience of creation, fall, redemption, restoration, and consummation are the subtext. Without the main text, the subtext doesn’t make much sense (or even exist, for that matter). I believe the reason so many followers of Jesus are still crying out for freedom and still finding themselves bound up in slavery is because the don’t understand the most important part of the story — the part where we discover who this good God really is. The reason this is so important is because our freedom is dependant on it. If our freedom is dependent on form, then the form of our freedom is relationship with the good God of the Bible. We will never be free until we experience who this God is through an actual relationship with him. Freedom comes from desiring God for who he actually is, not what he has done for us. When we focus on only what God has done for us, we don’t relate to God for who he is. When that happens, we are dragged into a whole new kind of religious slavery. Our freedom is predicted on our being in an actual relational union with the God of the gospel. This means we will have to look up from the subtext of what God has done for us and fall in love with the God who is, well, everything. Being loved and in love with this God is the form that freedom requires to be experienced. We will never be free until we love God for who he really is. Taken with permission from "The Answer to Our Cry" by Rick McKinley (p. 24-26)

Interested in buying Rick McKinley's book?

Love Story – A Homecoming Reflection

Love Story – A Homecoming Reflection

Message from the Alumni Director

“I in them and You in Me — so that they may be brought to complete unity. Then the world will know that You sent Me and have loved them even as You have loved Me.” John 17:23

This past month, we commemorated Multnomah’s 75th anniversary with a special Homecoming Week celebration. Traveling from California, Colorado, Canada, and even some as far away as Uganda, hundreds of alumni returned home in celebration of this significant milestone in Multnomah’s history. Read the rest of this entry »