Diverse culture, one community

We aspire to be an educational institution where all students can flourish and have equal opportunity for success. We seek to treat all people with love, respect, dignity, and fairness. We affirm the uniqueness of each person regarding age, race, nationality, gender, socio-economic status, ability, or faith denomination. We are all members of the body of Christ, and our unity in diversity brings glory to God.

students and staff at Mosaic week

Inclusive Initiatives

Multicultural Center

The Multicultural Center exists to foster opportunities for underrepresented persons to feel a sense of belonging in the Multnomah community and explore their authentic selves where safety, diversity, and God are honored. The Multicultural Center is located at 615 NE 87th Ave. The center sits on the east edge of campus in the light-green house (formerly known as the Teacher Ed House). The student entry is accessible from the heart of campus, through the back door of the center.

The center is open to students Mon-Sat from 2:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Students Clapping and Cheering

Undivided Club

The Undivided Club exists to provide a space for openness, honesty, and raw discussions in the context of identity, humanity, and racial and social justice. The club highlights issues of significance within today’s context and allows its members to be vulnerable and learn from one another in a gracious and understanding environment. The Undivided Club supports the ongoing mission of multicultural engagement and unity at Multnomah University.

Mosaic Week Voices

Voices Scholarship

The Voices Scholarship is a program that develops students of color and their allies — known as Voices Scholars — into leaders on the MU campus. This is accomplished by mentoring, providing leadership opportunities, and spreading awareness of diversity and inclusion efforts from student-driven platforms. The Scholars participate in diversity and inclusion initiatives including events, workshops, training sessions, and more. Students may apply online like they would for any other scholarship. Learn more about the scholarship.

Graduating student hugging faculty

Mosaic Month

Mosaic Month is an annual, month-long series of events meant to spark critical thinking and dialogue around issues of diversity, inclusion, cultural identity, and justice on the Multnomah University campus. We desire to stir conversations that promote equity, understanding, and viewing diversity through a biblical lens.

In the past years, we have done Mosaic Weeks, with it being transitioned to a month-long event this year. Take a look at our previous Mosaic Weeks:

Mosaic Week 2019

Mosaic Week 2018

Black or African American Male Speaking

Department Leadership

The Vice President of Diversity & Inclusive Development (VPDID), Jessica Taylor, reports directly to the President and serves on the President’s Council. The VPDID advises the President and the President’s Council on issues of diversity and serves as an integrating partner with campus leaders, students, faculty, staff, and various university committees.

She proactively develops and implements initiatives, programs, and activities that educate about cultural competency and inclusion and promote accountability for members of the university community. Spiritual Life, Student Counseling & Wellness, Veterans Resource Center, and Career Services are all serving under this departmental leadership. Each department serves the higher goals of diversity, equity, and inclusion within the context of the holistic development of each student we serve.

Contact the Multicultural Engagement Team

Jessica Taylor
Renjy Abraham

Dean of Spiritual Life and Cultural Integration
(503) 251-6428
renjyabraham@multnomah.edu

NAE Statement Against Racism

The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) recently shared a statement that we, as a university, embrace and support:

The NAE laments the recurring trauma experienced by African Americans. We condemn racism and the violent abuse of power, call for justice for victims and their families and exhort churches to combat attitudes and systems that perpetuate racism. We are grateful for law enforcement officers who honorably serve and protect our communities, and urge our members to uphold them in prayer. Christians believe that racism is an affront to the value of individuals created in God’s image and to the divinely designed diversity of redeemed humanity. This denial of personhood and belonging runs contrary to the peace and unity that God intended in the beginning and that the Bible depicts as our destiny.

Racism appears in beliefs or practices that distinguish or elevate one race over others. When accompanied and sustained by imbalances of power, prejudice moves beyond individual relationships to institutional practices. Such racial injustice is the systemic perpetuation of racism. Its existence has unfairly benefited some and burdened others simply due to the color of their skin and the cultural associations based upon perceptions of race.

No race or ethnicity is greater or more valuable than another. Evangelicals believe that the good news of Jesus Christ has the power to break down racial and ethnic barriers (Ephesians 2:14–18). Racism should not only be addressed after tragic events. Our communities of faith must pursue sustained efforts in this labor of love and justice.